Yes, YOU Can Drive an RV: What YOU Need to Know

RV driving for beginners: All the tips you need to drive an RV for the first time

If you’re new to it (or even if you’re not) driving a Class A motorhome can present a challenge. Even if you’re been driving cars and smaller vehicles for a long time, it takes practice to get used to the quirks of such a large and heavy vehicle. The following Class A motorhome driving tips will help you to stay safe on the roads and feel confident behind the wheel of your luxurious RV.

Class A motorhomes at Vista del Sol RV Resort, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is a Class A Motorhome?

Motorhomes are divided into “classes” based on their size. The average, small motorhome that you see used for road trip vacations is probably a Class C. These smaller vehicles typically weigh between 10,000 and 12,000 pounds. Class A motorhomes are the largest class and can weigh anything from 13,000 pounds up to as much as 30,000 pounds.

Even a Class C motorhome can feel unwieldy and bulky to someone who is accustomed to driving a car. Class A motorhomes are huge by comparison and they handle more like a bus than a car. The trade-off is that there is far more space for home comforts and many Class A motorhomes are just as comfortable and luxurious as a small family house.

Class A motorhome interior © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Do I need a RV License?

The idea of an “RV license” is a bit of a misnomer. The rules on vehicle licenses vary from state to state and province to province. No state currently has an explicit law that relates to the driving of RVs. States do, however, divide their licenses up into classes based upon the weight of the vehicle that the driver is handling and in some cases whether or not they have a trailer.

The sheer size of Class A motorhomes means that in some cases a motorist may need a special license to drive one. It depends on the weight of the motorhome. Let’s imagine you live in Pennsylvania. If you are driving an RV that weighs less than 26,000 pounds you don’t need a special license. If the RV weighs more than 26,000 pounds you will need a Class B non-commercial license. If you have a trailer and the weight goes over 26,000 pounds then you need a Class A non-commercial license.

Every state has different rules. Some states are more lenient than others. It’s a good idea to check the laws in your state or province and those you intend to regularly travel in before buying a large RV.

Class A motorhome at Tom Sawyer RV Park, West Memphis, Arkansas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Handling Tips and Tricks

Once you’ve cleared up the legal aspects, the next challenge is to hit the road. It takes a while to get used to handling a large motorhome but it’s worth it once you master it because you’ll be able to visit new places and see the sights in luxury free from the constraints of a hotel.

Class A motorhome on Utah Scenic Byway 12 © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Start with a Short, Easy Trip

Keep things simple for your first trip. As strange as it sounds consider a “staycation.” The last thing you want is for your first trip in your brand new RV to be marred with stress, broken itineraries or worse, a broken-down vehicle. Drive on easy roads that you’re familiar with and stay in a local campground. Give yourself plenty of time to get used to how the RV moves, how well it handles hills, how much space you need to stop, and how it turns.

Class A motorhome at Columbia Riverfront RV Park, Woodland, Washington © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Tech Makes Life Easier

When you’re sitting in a Class A motorhome you’re higher up than you are used to being in your sedan or even in a smaller motorhome. Since your vehicle is also longer and wider you need more space to turn and you’re heavier so your stopping distances are longer. You need to take this all into account and it can take a while for your brain to adjust when it comes to judging distances. You’ll also have blind spots that are bigger than the ones you’re accustomed to in the mirrors of a standard car.

The good news is that there are high-tech answers to some of these problems. Some Class A motorhomes offer driving assist technology such as back up cameras, lane tracking, and adaptive steering. They make parking, backing up, and other maneuvers much easier.

Class A motorhome at Whispering Oaks RV Park, Weimar, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Don’t Fight the Vehicle

Modern motorhomes have many nice “quality of life” features such as power steering, auto-leveling, improved suspension, and ABS. Take advantage of these. Be gentle on the steering, drive slowly and steadily, and give yourself plenty of space for any turns you need to take. Remember that ABS is designed to cut your stopping distance but in a very heavy vehicle you still have a lot of inertia especially on downward slopes. 

If you’re nervous about handling an RV, consider taking classes. Many companies offer rentals and classes where you can practice driving in a controlled environment to build your confidence.

Class A motorhome on Padre Island National Seashore, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Take Regular Breaks

Remember that you don’t have to get to your destination on a fixed schedule when you’re on a road trip. If you’re held up for a while, that’s not a crisis. You quite literally have a house behind you. If you’re feeling tired, stressed, or slightly concerned, pull over at the next rest area or truck stop and take a break. Get your co-pilot to take over the driving for a while if they’re able to do so. If not, just take a nap, go for a short walk, and then start driving again.

Don’t drive in difficult conditions such as heavy rain, fog, snow, ice, or excessive wind. If you don’t like driving late at night, rest. The point of owning a luxury motorhome is to do things on your terms. Take your time and get to your destination safely then enjoy your holiday.

Class A motorhome at Coastal Georgia RV Resort, Brunswick, Georgia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Worth Pondering…

No matter where we go in our motorhome, that sense of independence is satisfying. We have our own facilities, from comfortable bed to a fridge full of our favorite foods. We set the thermostat the way we like it and go to bed and get up in our usual routine.

A Journey of Incredible Beauty: Trail of the Ancients

Take your time and savor the sights—and along much of the route…the silence

Far too often we consider the roads that we travel purely as a means to get from point A to point B. Most spend far more hours in their cars commuting and running errands than truly enjoying what lies beyond the edge of the asphalt or concrete. But once you hit the road in your recreational vehicle, why not get off the roads most traveled and take in the breath-taking splendor of America’s system of scenic byways?

Monument Valley © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The Trail of the Ancients, a federally designated National Scenic Byway circles through the ancient Puebloan (Anasazi) Country of southeastern Utah, providing opportunity to view scenic landscapes, archaeological, cultural, and historic sites, as well as Natural Bridges and Hovenweep (also in Colorado) national monuments, Monument Valley, Edge of the Cedars State Park, and Manti La Sal National Forest. It’s a land filled with 250-million-year-old rock formations, mysterious Anasazi ruins, and remnants of long-ago Mormon pioneer families, all but undiscovered by crowds of tourists. An extension of this route continues into Colorado to Mesa Verde National Park, Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, and Ute Mountain Tribal Park.

Take your time and savor the sights—and along much of the route…the silence. Attempt this 482-mile drive (366 miles in Utah; 116 miles in Colorado) in a single day or two and you’ll miss the point. This landscape took thousands of years to create; you’ll never appreciate it at 65 miles per hour. Instead, take a week or more, stopping to walk through the numerous parks, preserves, monuments, and unnamed places whose beauty defies categorization. Start at any point along the route.

Utah Highway 261 © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The Trail of the Ancients National Scenic Byway enters Utah east of Monticello on U.S. Highway 491 and continues to the junction in Monticello with U.S. Highway 191. Turn south onto U.S. 191 and travel to Blanding where you’ll find Edge of the Cedars State Park and Museum, a good stop for an introduction to the Ancestral Puebloan (Anasazi) pre-history of the area. Visitors can walk the paths through the ruins and climb into the kiva via a ladder, just as the original residents did. Exceptionally rare and well-preserved artifacts are at the heart of the museum exhibits.

Utah Highway 261 © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

From Blanding the route follows U.S. Highway 191 south to the junction with Utah Highway 95 and continues west on Highway 95 to Utah Highway 261 passing Butler Wash Ruin, Mule Canyon Ruin, and Natural Bridges National Monument. Butler Wash Ruins, about 10.5 miles west of Blanding, has cliff-type dwellings located under rocky overhangs in a lush green valley along the river. An easy half-mile hike allows closer views. Eight miles further west along Highway 95 brings you to Mule Canyon Indian Ruins at milepost 101. Adjacent to the road, the site contains dwelling units, a reconstructed open kiva, and round tower—all made of stone.

Natural Bridges National Monument © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Just a few more miles and you’re at Natural Bridges National Monument about 35 miles west of Blanding. Located atop a 5,500- to 6,500-foot mesa a nine-mile, one-way, paved loop road winds through the park, revealing spectacular views of deep pinyon-filled canyons with scattered ancient cliff dwellings and three of the world’s largest natural stone bridges. Bridges differ from arches in that they are created primarily by stream action; whereas arches are created primarily by rain and wind.

Natural Bridges National Monument © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The bridges in this monument are all easily viewed from overlook areas along Bridge View Drive, or you can hike down into the canyon and walk under them. Interpretive signing is present at each overlook. Horsecollar Ruin Overlook Trail is mostly level and leads over the mesa to the edge of White Canyon. The small cliff dwelling is unique in that it is still plastered. The doorways to the two granaries are shaped like the horsecollars used in harness equipment. A small campground is limited to RVs less than 26 feet but an overflow area on the edge of the park has plenty of room.

Moki Dugway © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

From Natural Bridges National Monument, the Trail of the Ancient Scenic Byway turns south at the junction with Highways 95 and 261. Along this route you’ll find access to Grand Gulch Primitive Area and hiking trails on the mesa top. Prior to dropping off the Moki Dugway is County Road 274, a 5-mile remote dirt road leading to Muley Point which has been listed by National Geographic as one of the most outstanding views in America. From its magnificent overlook you’ll peer deep into the San Juan River Canyon and onto Monument Valley 25 miles or so in the distance.

Moki Dugway © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The infamous Moki Dugway is a 3-mile stretch of unpaved road that descends 1,000 feet down tight switchbacks from the edge of Cedar Mesa into the Valley of the Gods. The dugway itself is a historic part of the trail, built during the uranium boom to accommodate ore trucks that traveled from the mines on Cedar Mesa to the mill near the Navajo community of Halchita across the San Juan River from Mexican Hat. Never planned for public use, Moki Dugway is not recommended for RV travel.

Valley of the Gods © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

From the bottom of the Dugway our journey continues past the entrance to the little-known Valley of the Gods and onto the junction with Utah Highway 316 which leads to Goosenecks State Park. Although Valley of the Gods is not listed as a site on the Trail, it is worth visiting. The 17-mile loop drive on a native surface road leads among sandstone monoliths which have been given fanciful names such as Seven Sailors, Southern Lady, Rooster Butte, and Battleship Butte.  The valley allows a close-up look at towers and mesas of multicolored sandstone and other sedimentary rocks in subtle shades of pink, red, gold, orange, and purple. The sandstone monoliths here are reminiscent of Monument Valley. This route puts travelers on Highway 163, between Bluff and Mexican Hat.

Goosenecks State Park is another adventure in geology revealing the skeleton of the earth in the layers formed by the San Juan River 1,000 feet below. The Goosenecks of the San Juan River is one of the most striking examples of an “entrenched river meander” in North America. Like a snake the river twists and turns and coils back on itself for a distance of over six miles while advancing only 1.5 miles west as it flows toward Lake Powell. Over 300 million years of geologic activity is revealed from Goosenecks State Park. Located at the end of Highway 316, Gooseneck is a wilderness park encompassing 10 acres.

Monument Valley © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Utah Highway 261 continues to the junction with U.S. Highway 163 and the town of Mexican Hat. Founded in the early part of the 20th century during an oil boom, Mexican Hat has a population of less than 100 and functions mostly as a stopover point for visitors on their way to Monument Valley or as a base for river expeditions.

At the junction turn right to enter Mexican Hat and on to Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park where sandstone buttes, mesas, and spires rise majestically from the desert floor. Monument Valley offers the quintessential Western backdrop made famous in countless Western movies directed by John Ford. An unpaved, and at times rough, road loops through the park. Several overlooks offer spectacular views of the wonders of Monument Valley.

Monument Valley © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Monument Valley’s towers, which range in height from 400 to 1,000 feet, are made of de Chelly sandstone, which is 215 million years old, with a base of organ rock shale. The towers are the remnants of mesas, or flat-topped mountains. Mesas erode first into buttes like the Elephant, which typically are as high as they are wide, then into slender spires like the Three Sisters.

After exploring the wonders of Monument Valley retrace your route for 21 miles to Mexican Hat on U.S. Highway 163 and continue east to the pioneer-era town of Bluff on the edge of the Navajo Nation. Snuggled up against the San Juan River, the town was settled by the famous “Hole-In-The-Rock” expedition of Mormon pioneers in the 1880s. Continue past Bluff and travel east on Utah Highway 262 towards the town of Aneth and follow the signs to Hovenweep National Monument.

Hovenweep National Monument © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Known for its square, oval, circular, and D-shaped towers, Hovenweep National Monument protects six prehistoric clusters of Native American ruins. Established in 1923, the villages date from the Pueblo period of the mid 13th century. They are spread over a 20-mile area along the Utah-Colorado state line. Unlike the large ruins at Mesa Verde, these are approachable and the visitor can wander among the fallen walls and consider the people who built them.

From Hovenweep return to Aneth and drive southeast on Utah Highway 162 and Colorado Highway 41 to the Four Corners and northeast on U.S. Highway 160 to Ute Mountain Tribal Park. Part of the Ute Mountain Indian Reservation, the Ute Mountain Tribal Park has been set aside to preserve remnants of the Ancestral Puebloan and Ute cultures. The Park encompasses approximately 125,000 acres around a 25 mile stretch of the Mancos River. Within the park are hundreds of surface sites and cliff dwellings, Ancestral Puebloan petroglyphs, and historic Ute wall paintings and petroglyphs.

Mesa Verde National Monument © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

From Ute Mountain, drive north on U.S. Highway to Cortez and Mesa Verde National Park. Fourteen centuries of history are displayed at Mesa Verde National Park. Mesa Verde offers an excellent opportunity to see and experience the life of the Ancestral Puebloans. Spectacular cliff dwellings and mesa-top villages were built between A.D. 450 and 1300, when the Ancestral Puebloans migrated from the area. 

The park is split into a series of sub-mesas all bearing different names. There are thousands of archaeological sites across the park and excellent interpretive loops and scenic pullouts. Hiking and climbing ladders in and out of cliff dwellings is one option, or walks through less rigorous self-guided routes are also available. 

Mesa Verde National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

On this note we end our fascinating discovery of an ancient land of incredible beauty.

Worth Pondering…

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands, but in seeing with new eyes.

—Marcel Proust, French novelist

Sedona Is One Huge Psychic Vortex (Supposedly)

It’s basically Disneyland for the New Age crowd

Sedona is a city of psychics, tarot readers, reiki healers, and crystal dealers. Retail stores like Center for the New Age cater to a very specific kind of tourist: those drawn to the area for its supposed metaphysical and spiritual assets. According to these truth-seekers, Sedona is one of the world’s greatest hotspots for psychic energy: whirling and vibrating, creating portals that enhance consciousness. The energy is that strong—so overwhelming, in fact, that juniper trees twist and bend themselves over it. 

Sedona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Sedona—population 10,322— has always held a certain appeal, reflected in its 3 million annual visitors. Its lush green vegetation, towering red rock formations, and vast blue sky would inspire even the most inactive imagination. Indigenous tribes have long regarded the area as sacred. It’s the home of the Yavapai-Apache who hold a spring ceremony every year at Boynton Canyon where the Great Spirit Mother gave birth to the human race.

Sedona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

But the Sedona we know today began to emerge in 1980 after a professional psychic named Page Bryant (1943-2017) referred to four locations of powerful energy centers—Airport Mesa, Cathedral Rock, Bell Rock, and Boynton Canyon—as “power vortexes,” or places containing mystic energy, putting a word to a concept first discovered in the 1950s. By meditating in these locations, New Age devotees believe that one will experience both spiritual awakening and physical healing.

Sedona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Amid these four scenic poles, psychic vibrations trembled more intensely. People noticed their skin tingling when close to the perceived energy source. Escaping to a higher consciousness just came easier in this confluence where thoughts and feelings were amplified (apparently all of Sedona is one big amplifier). Vortex locations can be described as electric, magnetic, or electromagnetic. Some say “female or male,” “positive or negative.”

Sedona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

If you want to get all scientific about it, there’s no actual magnetism or energy at these vortexes. But that doesn’t mean the spiritualists made up what they felt. After all, studies have found that just being outdoors has immense immune-boosting and mood-altering benefits plus increased clarity and concentration. 

For some it’s about connecting spirituality with the Earth, bringing this stuff out of woo woo and into wow wow. The therapeutic benefits of the vortexes are directly related to the physical attributes of Sedona. The high elevation, deep canyons, low population density, and the immense blue skies all combine to create an optimal environment for relaxation and brain stimulation.

Sedona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Colors are also important and Sedona has loads. The green of the vegetation signals growth, renewal, and hope to the subconscious. As for red-orange, the Uluru in Australia, a massive similar-hued rock is thought to hold spiritual significance. The red-orange color can be thought of as caffeine for the higher mind.

And if nothing happens? 

Relax and let the awesome beauty of the area inspire you, as it does me. 

Where to Experience Vortexes in Sedona

Sedona is filled with hundreds of vortexes. Following are the four first identified by Bryant plus some lesser-known ones recommended by “experts”. 

Sedona from Airport Mesa © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Airport Mesa

Its proximity to the center of town makes the Airport Mesa one of the most trafficked vortexes which means you probably won’t have it to yourself. The panoramic views are breathtaking especially at sunrise or sunset. You’ll see some of those twisted juniper trees, and some have claimed to see colored orbs. At night the stars seem close enough to touch. 

Bell Rock © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Bell Rock 

One of the most recognizable formations, Bell Rock is shaped like a huge standing bell. (Or, some say, an alien spaceship.) Many have reported a tingling sensation on exposed skin here. It’s easily accessible from the road with the strongest vibrations felt on the north side. 

Cathedral Rock © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Cathedral Rock 

This is the only one of the big four with “inflow” energy encouraging you to slow down and be introspective. The vortex is found where Oak Creek runs next to Cathedral Rock, and is called “Red Rock Crossing.” 

Boynton Canyon 

Boynton Canyon is a spiritual home of the Yavapai-Apache and considered the most sacred of the big four. Also known as the Kachina Woman Vortex Site, it’s both an inflow and an upflow site with the canyon as inflow and the ridges and peaks as upflow. It stretches two-and-a-half miles long with energy throughout. 

Chapel of the Holy Cross © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The Chapel of the Holy Cross 

Built into the red rocks, The Chapel of the Holy Cross was actually inspired by a visit by Marguerite Brunswig Staude to the Empire State Building. It overlooks Sedona and despite it being a Christian place of worship it’s believed to be full of vortex energy. Either way, it’s a stunning place to visit. 

Schnebly Hill Road © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Schnebly Hill 

Schnebly Hill is a remote scenic overlook that’s quite literally off-the-beaten-path: An off-road vehicle is required to get to the top but once there you’re in one of the highest plateaus in Sedona. This amazingly scenic road which requires a high-clearance vehicle eventually connects with Interstate 17 south of Flagstaff.

Oak Creek, Sedona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Eagle’s Nest

Alternative to the busy Airport Mesa is to hike to Eagle’s Nest in Red Rock State Park. It offers the same 360-degree panoramas without the people, noise, and parking problem. 

Worth Pondering…

The Image is more than an idea. It is a vortex or cluster of fused ideas and is endowed with energy.

—Ezra Pound

Beautifully Bizarre Joshua Tree Has Springtime Written All Over it

Camp, hike, and rock climb your way through California’s High Desert

California’s Mojave Desert has inspired a number of monumental artistic endeavors including the fictional planet Tatooine in Star Wars and the iconic U2 album The Joshua Tree. But Joshua Tree National Park which lies within the boundaries of the Mojave has a landscape and special magnetism all its own. People come to Joshua Tree for their own special reasons. Sometimes it’s wilderness. Other times people come here for the music history, the diversity of raptors, or the epic landscapes. People come to Joshua Tree to find themselves. And find yourself you will—whether you’re hiking, biking, rock climbing, camping, stargazing, or daydreaming about selling all your stuff to move to the desert. Here’s how to do it all on your next trip.

Joshua Tree National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The best time to visit Joshua Tree National Park 

Joshua Tree is open (and beautiful!) year round. Come in the spring or fall for the best weather (but keep in mind, the park gets extra busy January through April). If you visit in the hot summer months, plan outdoor activities early in the morning or later in the day when the air is cooler just to be safe. Most people spend four hours in the park according to park rangers. But Joshua Tree’s abundance of jaw-dropping geological and ecological sights mean one could spend days exploring the otherworldly landscape.

Joshua Tree National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Fuel up in the funky artist towns nearby

There are over 100 miles of roads within the park and not a gas station in sight so fill up beforehand. The quirky towns surrounding the park—especially Joshua Tree, Twentynine Palms, and Yucca Valley—are also your best bet for grabbing a bite and a beer after a long day in the park. Populated by UFOlogists, solitude seekers, antique dealers, and offbeat creatives drawn to the desert, there are plenty of unusual adventures to be had in town. Definitely swing by Pioneertown which served as a film set for Old Westerns in a past life and today houses the area’s most famous bar and music venue, Pappy & Harriet’s.

Joshua Tree National Park Cottonwood entrance © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Getting into Joshua Tree National Park

The park’s larger than Rhode Island which means there’s a lot of ground to cover. Of the three main entrances, the Joshua Tree entrance (known as the West Entrance) is often the busiest. The North and South Entrances near Twentynine Palms and the Cottonwood Visitors Center, respectively, are less crowded. Get there early; parking lots often fill up by mid-morning.

Just drive up to one of the park’s entrances and pay at the booth. A seven-day vehicle permit runs $30. Alternatively, $55 gets you a pass valid for a full year—OR, if you think you’ll visit more than one national park in the next 12 months (and you should!), NPS offers an $80 pass that buys you entry to any park for a year.

Joshua Tree National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Hit Joshua Tree’s best hiking trails 

Once you’re all geared up with hiking boots and as much water as you can carry (seriously, it’s hot, especially in summer), it’s time to hit the trails. Skull Rock Nature Trail is one of the most popular in the park. From the Jumbo Rocks Campground, it’ll take you winding through about 1.7 miles of desert until you arrive at Skull Rock, an enormous boulder with two eye sockets carved into it by years of water erosion. It’s a pretty mild route and great for beginners. 

The second trail you should hit is the Wonderland of Rocks which lives up to its name. Pebbles, stones, and giant boulders are yours to traverse for 5.5 wonderful miles. Given the terrain, it’s considered a difficult trail so be sure you’re up to the task.

Keys View, Joshua Tree National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Around sunrise or sunset, wander over to Keys View, the highest lookout point in Joshua Tree at 5,187 feet. You can look out across the Coachella Valley and see as far as the Salton Sea and Palm Springs on clear days.

Check out the unparalleled plant and animal life 

I’ll assume you know the park’s tall and spiky namesake: the Yucca brevifolia, more commonly known as the “Joshua Tree.” In Spanish, the tree is known as izote de desierto, or desert dagger, which pretty much sums it up. It’s important to remember that since these trees are native to this 1,235-square mile expanse of desert, they’re strictly protected—aka, no touchy!

Cholla Cactus Garden, Joshua Tree National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Visit the Cholla Cactus Garden to walk amongst hundreds of beautiful cholla. This flat loop leads hikers through nearly 10 acres of landscape dominated by the teddybear cholla. Swaying in the desert breeze they almost resemble coral (and, much like coral, should be left alone). A word of advice: do not attempt to pet this teddybear. The stem-joints can easily detach and hitch a ride due to the miniscule barbs on the spines giving it the nickname “jumping cholla.” Once they’ve latched on the spines are very painful to remove.

You’ll also spot the ocotillo (pronounced oh-koh-TEE-yoh), one of the most curious and unique plants of the southwestern United States. Ocotillos produce clusters of bright red flowers at their stem tips which explain the plant’s name. Ocotillo means “little torch” in Spanish.

Joshua Tree National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Joshua Tree National Park is known more for its flora than fauna but there’s also plenty of wildlife in and around the park. Birding is especially popular with native species like roadrunners, raptors, and migratory flocks as well. Predators like bobcats, coyotes, and snakes also roam these parts, and—lest we forget—keep an eye out for our adorable friend, the desert tortoise!

Wonderland of Rocks, Joshua Tree National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Joshua Tree is a rock climber’s paradise

Whether you’re brand new to climbing or navigate cliffs like a baby mountain goat, Joshua Tree’s 9,000+ climbing routes means that everyone’s welcome to give it a go. I also feel the need to note that most of the routes have truly creative names; take, for example, Yabba Dabba Don’t (15-foot climb), Breakfast of Champions (170-foot climb with 2 pitches), Room to Shroom (80-foot climb), Dangling Woo Li Master (100-foot climb), and so on. 

For a route best suited to beginner and moderate climbers, head over to the Quail Springs area, home to the ever-charming Trashcan Rock, one of the most popular climbing spots due to its relative ease and the cool shade that covers it during the afternoon. Intersection Rock also makes a great spot for novices and The Eye ends with a tunnel that opens up onto excellent views across the desert.

Joshua Tree National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Look up at the stars

Joshua Tree National Park is a Silver Tier International Dark Sky Park which means nighttime can be pretty extraordinary.

Joshua Tree National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Where to bed down at night

Of the 520 campsites in Joshua Tree National Park about half are first-come, first-serve. The others accept reservations through Recreation.gov.

Joshua Tree National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What to bring and other essential tips

Sunscreen and water are must-haves year-round. The National Park Service stresses that there are no water sources inside the park, so again, pack a lot of water… and then pack even more. Binoculars, sturdy hiking shoes, snacks, a flashlight, a camera, and wide-brimmed hat (I recommend a Tilley) are also suggested.

To avoid being one of the approximately 60 search-and-rescue operations Joshua Tree sees every year, explore the park with a buddy and always let people know where you’re going. Cell phones don’t work in most of the park so if communication is crucial bring a satellite phone and a printed map to get around.

Joshua Tree National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Over 80 percent of Joshua Tree is officially designated wilderness—emphasis on wild. Be respectful of wildlife to avoid tangling with an angry critter. And if you remember one thing about your visit to Joshua Tree National Park, it should be “leave no trace.” Be sure to leave the park as pristine as you found it to help preserve its natural beauty for generations to come.

Worth Pondering…

Trampled in dust I’ll show you a place high on the desert plain where the streets have no

name, where the streets have no name …

— Joshua Tree, sung by U2, 1987

Meet the RVs: The Towables

Recreational vehicles take many different forms—from small and simple tow trailers to mobile mansions with king-sized beds and granite countertops

Consumer preferences have changed drastically since the start of the pandemic with travel being no exception. Thousands of Americans and Canadians have opted out of airline tickets and hotel reservations in favor of RVs, a safer method of travel that allows for self-contained excursions with a bedroom, bathroom, and kitchen all on-board.

Travel trailer at Rivers Run RV Resort, Bakersfield, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

If you’re here, you’re probably wondering if the RV lifestyle is for you. Good news—it most likely is! Because RVs offer so much variety in form, function, and value, there’s bound to be an RV that suits your lifestyle and travel needs. Just like families, RVs come in all shapes and sizes. From large class A motorhomes and fifth wheel trailers to compact pop-ups and camper vans, there is an RV that will fit your lifestyle. From weekend getaways to touring the great outdoors to working from the road, there’s an RV for every family and every budget.

When deciding between different types of RVs, it is important to understand the features and amenities associated with each and the pros and cons. The categories are not super difficult to grasp. Motorhomes come in Classes A, B, and C and trailers break down into fifth wheels and travel trailers. I’ll dive right into each category including its pros and cons, model details, features and amenities, and approximate cost. In today’s post we’ll focus on the various types of towable RVs.

Fifth wheel at Alamo Lake State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Trailer Types

A trailer is different from a motorhome in that it must be towed behind another vehicle. To match the towing vehicle with the trailer requires knowledge of the weight of the trailer and the towing capacity of the tow vehicle. The most common types of trailers are fifth wheels and travel trailers, each of which has different requirements.

Fifth wheel at Coastal Georgia RV Resort, Brunswick, Georgia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Fifth Wheels Trailers

A large picture window at the rear of the RV for panoramic views is one thing that sets fifth wheels apart from other RVs. Fifth wheels often come with the same amenities as a Class A motorhome. It is common to have three or more slideouts in a fifth-wheel. These trailers are constructed with a raised forward section that provides a more spacious bi-level floor plan. They are designed to be towed by a pickup truck equipped with a device known as a fifth-wheel hitch.

The term “fifth wheel” comes from the configuration of the trailer itself. The front of the trailer is elevated off the ground and extends over the bed of a truck where a hitching mechanism fixes it to the truck bed. This setup makes the fifth wheel trailer easier to navigate than trailers towed behind a car’s bumper as the fifth wheel tracks more closely to the truck.

Fifth wheel at Leaf Verde RV Park, Buckeye, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Model Details

Length: 21-40 feet

Cost: $43,000-$120,000+

Sleeps: 2-8

Typical Features & Amenities

Large living area

Large residential kitchen

Large bathroom with walk-in shower and toilet

Fifth wheel at Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Pros:

Spacious and potentially luxurious

Lots of storage space

Better maneuverability than a travel trailer

Cons:

Require tow vehicle equipped with a fifth-wheel hitch

Use of a truck means less room for passengers

Travel trailer at Sonoran Desert RV Resort, Gila Bend, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Travel Trailers

Travel Trailers are the most popular type of RV because they come in all shapes and sizes and can accommodate solo travelers all the way up to large families. As long as the vehicle is equipped with a standard trailer hitch, smaller travel trailer models can be towed by mid-size vehicles including an SUV or minivan while larger models can be towed with a pickup truck.

Travel trailers are lighter and less expensive than fifth wheels and can range in size from cozy to roomy.

Travel trailer at Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Model Details

Length: 20-35 feet

Cost: $25,000-$80,000+

Sleeps: 2-8

Typical Features & Amenities

Residential kitchen

Full-size bathroom

Living area

Travel trailer at Picacho Peak State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Pros:

Less expensive

Easy to move

Many vehicles can tow them

Cons:

Less spacious

Fewer conveniences

More difficult to maneuver that fifth wheel trailers

Pop-up camper at Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Pop-up campers

Pop-up campers, also known as folding camping trailers, appeal to budget-conscious consumers looking for a lighter weight RV that allows for towing behind many typical family vehicles, including some small cars. Pop-ups are folded down to a more compact size for easy storage and travel. This style of RV also allows the user to feel closer to nature and connected to the outdoors by mimicking the feeling of sleeping outside.

Model Details

Length: 15-23 feet

Cost: $5,000-$25,000+

Sleeps: 2-8

Pros:

Budget-friendly

Low-profile and easy to tow

Can be towed by most vehicles

Cons:

Less spacious

Less insulated from weather

Few amenities

Expandable Trailers

A cross between a travel trailer and a pop-up camper, the expandable trailer ends pop out to offer more sleeping space. Expandable units are lighter than conventional travel trailers and more affordable.

Model Details

Length: 8-16 feet

Cost: $10,000-$20,000+

Sleeps: 2-8

Typical Features & Amenities

Expandable roof and/or sides

Light-weight

Towable by family car or SUV

Pros:

Budget-friendly

Low-profile and easy to tow

Can be towed by most vehicles

Cons:

Less spacious

Less insulated from weather

Few amenities

Toy hauler at River Run RV Resort, Bakersfield © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Sport Utility RVs

Sport utility RVs, also known as toy haulers, are built for those who want to take motorcycles, dirt bikes, ATVs, or other motorized toys on the road with them while RVing. The back of the RV drops down forming a ramp for access into a garage area where sporting equipment and motorized toys can be stored safely and accessed quickly. This type of RV can be made as a travel trailer, fifth wheel, or a Class A motorhome. The garage area and living quarters are usually separated by a wall.

Model Details

Length: 19-40 feet

Cost: $30,000-$250,000+

Sleeps: 2-8

Typical Features & Amenities

Garage for toys and sports equipment

Lots of storage

Full kitchen

Pros:

Defined space for sports equipment

Lots of storage space

Choice of motorized or towable

Cons:

Reduced livable space

Extra length required for garage

Truck camper at Saguaro Lake, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Truck Campers

Truck Campers are portable units designed to be loaded onto the bed of a pickup truck. Because truck campers are easily loaded and unloaded from the truck they can be used as a pickup when not used as a camper. They are easy to drive and the truck’s bumper hitch can be used to tow boats, ATVs, and small trailers.

Model Details

Length: 8-20 feet

Cost: $20,000-$40,000+

Sleeps: 2-6

Typical Features & Amenities

Nimble and easy to drive

Easy to park

Good on rough terrain

Pros:

Fits in a garage

Truck can serve double purpose

Can go most anywhere

Cons:

Tight living quarters

Reduced livable space

Limited storage space

Worth Pondering…

The attraction of recreational vehicle travel is to see the country, visit new places, meet interesting people, and experience the freedom of the open road.

The Best RV Camping May 2021

Explore the guide to find some of the best in May camping across America

It’s May. Spring has sprung and seems to be fading but summer isn’t quite here yet. The weather is sunny with a chance of a welcome shower not an all-out downpour. Basically, it’s the perfect time to camp.

But where should you park your RV? With so many options out there you may be overwhelmed with the number of locales calling your name.

Here are 10 of the top locations to explore in May. RVing with Rex selected this list of 5 star RV resorts from parks personally visited.

Planning an RV trip for a different time of year? Check out our monthly RV park recommendations for the best places to camp in March and April.

Pala Casino RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Pala Casino RV Resort, Pala, California

A new facility, Pala Casino RV Resort offers 100 full-service sites with grass lawns and picnic tables. Site selection includes 30 feet x55 feet back-in sites, 30 feet x 60 feet luxury sites with barbecue grills, and 30 feet x 70 feet pull-through sites. Amenities include 20/30/50 amp power, water and sewer hook-ups, free Wi-Fi, cable TV, restrooms and showers, heated swimming pool, two spas, fenced dog park, and 24 hour security patrol. Pala Casino RV Resort received top marks from Good Sam in every category including facilities, restrooms and showers, and visual appearance. The resort is located on SR-76, 6 miles east of I-15.

Blake Ranch RV Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Blake Ranch RV Park and Horse Motel, Kingman, Arizona

Easy-on easy-off (I-40, Exit 151), Blake Ranch RV Park is a convenient location to overnight and for a longer stay to explore the area. The RV park offers long and wide and level pull-through and back-in sites with 30/50 electric, water, sewer, cable TV, and Wi-Fi. Amenities include park store, private showers and bathrooms, laundry facilities, dog run, recreation room, and horse motel. There’s plenty to do and see in the area. The park is 12 miles east of Kingman and Historic Route 66 and the ghost towns of Chloride and Oatman are easy day trips.

Jamaica Beach RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Jamaica Beach RV Resort, Galveston, Texas

Jamaica Beach RV Resort is across the street from the beach on Galveston Island with wide open views of the Gulf. The park offers 181 pull-through sites with full hookups, concrete pads, picnic table at every sites, and all-inclusive amenities like a 700-foot-long lazy river. Other park amenities include a relaxing beach pool, family pool, indoor infinity hot tub, outdoor hot tub, splash pad, 3 laundry facilities, 3 shower houses, and pickleball courts.

Cedar Pass Campground © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Cedar Pass Campground, Badlands National Park, South Dakota

Located near the Ben Reifel Visitor Center, the Cedar Pass Campground has 96 level sites with scenic views of the badlands formations. Enjoy the stunning sunsets, incredible night skies, and breathtaking sunrises from the comfort of your RV. Camping in Cedar Pass Campground is limited to 14 days. The campground is open year-round with limited availability in the winter season. Due to fire danger, campfires are not permitted in this campground and collection of wood is prohibited. However, camp stoves or contained charcoal grills can be used in campgrounds and picnic areas.

Ambassador RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Ambassador RV Resort, Caldwell, Idaho

Ambassador RV Resort is a 5-star resort that is easy-on, easy off (I-84 at Exit 29) with 188 full-service sites, pool, spa, sauna, and 5,000 square foot recreation hall. Features 30-foot x 85-foot short term pull-through sites, 35-foot x 75-foot long term pull through sites, 45-foot x 60-foot back-in sites and wide-paved streets. Pets are welcome if friendly and owner is well trained.

Located near Idaho’s wine country and convenient to the Boise metro area, the Ambassador is the perfect home base for all your activities.

Sun Outdoors © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Sun Outdoors Sevierville Pigeon Forge, Sevierville, Tennessee

Formally known as River Plantation, Sun Outdoors Sevierville Pigeon Forge is located along the Little Pigeon River in eastern Tennessee. The park is located near the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the popular attractions of Pigeon Forge and Gatlinburg. Big rig friendly, guests can choose from a selection of modern and spacious, full hookup RV sites that include concrete pads, a fire ring, and picnic table. Our back-in site was in the 75-foot range with 50/30-amp electric service, water, sewer, and Cable TV centrally located. Amenities include a swimming pool with hot tub, basketball court, game room, fitness center, outdoor pavilion, fenced-in Bark Park, and dog washing station.

Smokiam RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Smokiam RV Resort, Soap Lake, Washington

Smokiam RV Resort has undergone a full renovation with new premium big rig friendly RV sites, remodeled restrooms/shower facilities, renovated playground area, new cabin rentals, Tepee rentals, a sandy beach with a new dock and watercraft rentals, a renovated clubhouse for groups/events/adults and families, new café and espresso bar, a new miniature golf course, and 900 feet of sandy beach. Our site, D-3, is one of the ten new premium pull-through sites facing Soap Lake. These sites are extra long and extra wide designed for RVs up to 45 feet in length. 50/30-amp electric service, water, sewer, and cable TV are centrally located. Soap Lake is a unique mineral lake, world-renowned as “nature’s spa”.  One of only two similar lakes in the world, its waters have the most diverse mineral content of any body of water on earth and have long been believed to have healing properties. 

Oh! Kentucky Campground © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Oh! Kentucky Campground & RV Park, Berea, Kentucky

Oh! Kentucky Campground & RV Park is easy-on, easy-off I-75 at Exit 76. Our pull-through site was in the 75-foot range and level with utilities centrally located. The park offers 71 sites (all pull-through) with 50 and 30 amp electric service, water, and sewer. The Folk Arts and Crafts Capital of Kentucky, Berea is ranked among the top art communities in the U. S. Nestled between the Bluegrass region and the foothills of the Cumberland Mountains, Berea offers visitors over 40 arts and crafts shops featuring everything from handmade dulcimers and homemade chocolate to jewelry stores, art galleries, quilt-makers, and even glassblowing studios. Sculptures of mythical beasts, vibrantly painted open hands, and historic architecture are a few of the delights as one wanders the town and college.

Jack’s Landing RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Jack’s Landing RV Resort, Grants Pass, Oregon

New in 2002, Jack’s Landing RV Resort offers 54 RV sites adjacent to Interstate 5 (Exit 58). The nicely landscaped park has paved roads and concrete parking pads. Jack’s Landing is big rig friendly with pull-through sites in the 70-75 foot range (also back-in sites) and conveniently located 30/50-amp electric service, water, and sewer connections, and cable TV. Paved sites and fairly wide paved streets. Pleasingly landscaped and treed. The main office has restrooms, showers, a laundry, gym, and small ball court. Only negative is freeway noise.

Lake Osprey RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Lake Osprey RV Resort, Elberta, Alabama

A new destination luxury RV resort, Lake Osprey is located near the sugar-sand beaches of the Alabama Gulf Coast. The resort offers 147 RV sites located within a nature preserve next to Soldiers Creek Golf Club. Each RV lot has an extra-long 16-foot x 75-foot concrete pad, lighted pedestal, and lake or courtyard view. Amenities include free Wi-Fi, cable TV, and laundry.

Worth Pondering…

“Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?”
“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat.

—Lewis Carrol

10 Amazing Places to RV in May

If you’re dreaming of where to travel to experience it all, here are our picks for the best places to RV in May

May is a very nurturing month with mild temperatures that encourage people to enjoy the outdoors. Can’t you almost taste it? Summer’s sparkling citrusy zing in May’s advancing warmth and brightening light. In northern states and Canada, it’s a time to start braving lunch on park benches, light jackets in place of thick coats. Mercifully, the rest of America is emerging into summer proper, everywhere from Utah high desert to Texas and Kentucky. Even Canada’s warming up! So why wait a minute longer? It’s high time you hit the road.

There’s a lot to love about May: sunnier days, more time outside, and farmer’s markets just beginning to shine.

Planning an RV trip for a different time of year? Check out our monthly travel recommendations for the best places to travel in March and April. Also check out our recommendations from May 2020.

Greenville, South Carolina © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

South Carolina Road Trip

Mountains and beaches, food and art, history and wildlife—South Carolina has it all. With scenic mountains to the north, secluded beaches to the east, and charming towns scattered in between, South Carolina has a variety of landscapes that suit every mood. Embark on a road trip through the Palmetto state starting in the cultural capital of Greenville and traveling south to discover magnificent waterfalls, unique state parks, southern history, equestrian traditions, and fresh seafood. 

Congaree National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

About half an hour outside Columbia in the lush backcountry is Congaree National Park where you can see the largest intact old-growth bottomland hardwood forests in the southeastern US. Spend a day hiking, canoeing, or kayaking along 25 miles of swamps and forests. If you are at Congaree in late May to early June, you can also watch a magical firefly synchronization mating phenomenon that occurs at only a few spots around the world. 

Sequoia National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

California’s Giant Sequoias

When you think of California’s giant redwood trees, you likely imagine coastal redwoods. Those are the tall ones dotting the rugged northern California coastline and a road trip to see them is a must-do. But the giant sequoias are no slouches themselves! The giant sequoias you’ll see on this road trip are only known to exist in 75 specific groves along the western slopes of the Sierra Nevadas. What makes these giants unique is that they grow incredibly large around their base and this differentiates them from coastal redwoods which are typically measured in height.

Giant Forest © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

This specific journey will take you to the Discovery Tree, the first sequoia noted by naturalists in the 1850s and should the weather permit give you a sunset in the famed Yosemite Valley. Have your camera charged and ready to capture the magic of this road trip destination as Ansel Adams once saw it. And continue southward to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park and explore Grant Grove, Giant Forest, and General Sherman Tree, the world’s largest tree measured by volume.

Hovenweep National Monument © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Hovenweep National Monument, Utah

Built between A.D. 1200 and 1300, Hovenweep was once home to over 2,500 people. Explore the variety of unique structures at the six prehistoric villages that make up the Hovenweep National Monument. Hikes from the Visitor Center range from a 300-yard paved walk to the Stronghold House, to a 1.5-mile loop trail that takes visitors past structures in and along Little Ruin Canyon such as Hovenweep Castle, Square Tower, Hovenweep House, and Twin Towers. Ranger-led Dark Sky Astronomy Programs are offered spring through fall, weather permitting. Call ahead for details.

Bayou Teche at Breaux Bridge © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

A Deep Bayou Drive from NOLA

You should start this road trip with a rollicking good time in New Orleans’ French Quarter. Enjoy a few late NOLA nights, too many Hurricanes at Pat O’Brien’s, and some jazz at Preservation Hall, then sleep all that off before heading west (in your RV, of course) to begin a deep bayou road trip adventure. The area is known for its swampland dotted with moss-draped cypress trees teeming with wildlife which makes it the perfect destination for bird watching, paddling, fishing, and numerous other outdoor activities.

Lake Martin © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The best road to drive is Highway 31 which will take you along Bayou Teche from New Iberia to Breaux Bridge, a scenic route with garlands of moody Spanish moss that dangle from oaks and cypress trees while alligators and herons splash about in the swampy lagoons. Nature watchers and photographers have immediate access to some of the best birding sites in North America including Lake Martin (near Breaux Bridge) with its expansive shoreline and bottomland hardwood forest. At last count, birders have spotted 240 species here. In the evenings, snowy, great and cattle egrets, little blue herons, green herons, and yellow-crowed night herons gather to roost. Be sure to tour the Longfellow-Evangeline State Historic Site where you’ll learn about the area’s Creole and Cajun history and culture.

Alamo Lake © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Alamo Lake, Arizona

Often touted as one of the best bass fishing destinations in the western United States, Alamo Lake State Park is gearing up for another banner season! Bass will spawn as water temperatures rise this spring which makes them much easier to catch during your trip to this Sonoran Desert outdoor playground! Although bass fishing is on the agenda for many, this park offers so much more than memories hooked in the expansive lake…But, if you’ve thought about taking the dive into a new outdoor hobby, this is the place to do it, and the best time of year is coming up quick!

Jekyll Island Club © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Fodor’s Travel lists islands to visit

The well-known island getaways across the U.S. get all the glory but there are plenty of hidden gem islands which offer an equally stunning escape but with a little more peace and quiet. If you’re seeking a secluded and intimate getaway, look no further than Jekyll Island off the coast of Georgia. This coastal haven recently caught the attention of Fodor’s Travel (Forget Hawaii. Go to These 10 U.S. Islands Instead). This 5,500-acre island is home to 10 miles of shoreline and a variety of events, family-friendly activities, and attractions. From the iconic Driftwood Beach to the island’s historical homes (Jekyll Island Club), the Georgia Sea Turtle Center, and more, Jekyll Island has something for everyone.

Jekyll Island Campground © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Park your RV under the magnificent oaks on the northern tip of Jekyll Island. Located opposite the Clam Creek Picnic Area, you are near Driftwood Beach, the fishing pier and fascinating historic ruins. The Jekyll Island Campground offers 18 wooded acres with 206 campsites from tent sites to full hook-ups, pull through RV sites with electricity, cable TV, water, and sewerage. Wi-Fi and DSL

Other islands on Fodor’s list include Sanibel Island in Florida, Michigan’s Mackinac Island, and the Outer Banks of North Carolina which include Roanoke, Hatteras, and Ocracoke islands. To which I also add Georgia’s Cumberland Island.

New River Gorge National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Get wild in America’s newest national park

Last December we welcomed America’s 63rd National Park with West Virginia’s scenic New River Gorge. (If you’re still wondering how a place scores that designation, we’ve got you covered.) And No. 63 is brimming with beauty: There are cliffs and rocks galore along the really cool, actually-really-old river for all your adventuring needs. But the lazier among us can also enjoy eerie ghost towns and the third-highest bridge in the US for some great photo ops. Perusing Instagram shows us she’s especially gorgeous in spring making it a great time to visit right now before the masses catch on.

Vogel State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Vogel State Park, Georgia

One of the oldest state parks in Georgia, Vogel was established in 1931 and remains one of the most beloved north Georgia attractions. Situated at the base of Blood Mountain in the heart of the Chattahoochee National Forest, Vogel State Park has some truly gorgeous hiking trails.

I especially love the Trahlyta Lake Trail which crosses an earthen dam built back in 1935 by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). You’ll also get a chance to gaze at one of the most alluring waterfalls in Georgia, Trahlyta Falls. You can hike right alongside it via the Bear Hair Gap Trail, which guides you through the lower ridges of Blood Mountain.

For overnight stays the park offers 34 one- and two-bedroom cottages as well as walk-in campsites and RV-accessible campsites that have pull-through or back-in driveways.

From Moki Dugway to the Valley of the Gods © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The Trail of the Ancients and the Moki Dugway, Colorado and Utah

The Trail of the Ancients which traverses Colorado and Utah is America’s only national scenic byway dedicated solely to archaeology and will take you to some of the most famous sights in the country including Four Corners, Monument Valley, and Mesa Verde National Park. You could make this 480-mile drive straight through in one long day but following a six-day itinerary allows you to truly experience the Native American history along the route. The Trail of Ancients is paved save for a harrowing three-mile, switchback-laden stretch known as the Moki Dugway as it descends to the Valley of the Gods offering unrivaled panoramic views of this otherworldly landscape.

Dauphin Island © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Alabama’s Coastal Connection

True to its name the 130-mile-long Alabama’s Coastal Connection connects multiple communities and cities bordering Mobile Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. It also connects travelers to nature and history at nearby preserves, parks, and historic sites. The scenic byway features a ride on the Mobile Bay Ferry connecting Dauphin Island to the Fort Morgan Peninsula. The 40-minute ride across the mouth of Mobile Bay spans two historic forts where the Battle of Mobile Bay took place during the Civil War. Here Union Adm. David G. Farragut bellowed his now immortal command, “Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!”

Fort Gaines © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

From Dauphin Island to Orange Beach, Alabama’s 60 miles of Gulf Coast includes white-sand beaches. For a socially distant experience, explore the 7,100-acre Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge on the Fort Morgan Peninsula. In addition to beach access points to uncrowded sands, there are hiking trails through a maritime forest and coastal dune habitats with views of saltwater lagoons, freshwater lakes, the beach, the bay and the chance to see lots of wildlife. A number of waterfront towns line the coast. The artsy Eastern Shore enclave of Fairhope has a pier jutting a quarter-mile into the bay with an adjacent beach park and shady areas for a quiet picnic.

Worth Pondering…

When April steps aside for May, like diamonds all the rain-drops glisten; fresh violets open every day; to some new bird each hour we listen.