February 2024 RV Manufacturer Recalls: 18 Recalls Involving 6 RV Manufactures

A manufacturer recall can create a safety risk if not repaired

Your recreational vehicle may be involved in a safety recall and may create a safety risk for you or your passengers. Safety defects must be repaired by a certified dealer at no cost to you. However, if left unrepaired, a potential safety defect in your vehicle could lead to injury or even death.

What is a recall?

It’s always important to keep up with the latest recalls, no matter how small the issue may appear to be. Each week, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) publishes the latest information on recalls from minor to major defects. NHTSA releases its most recent list of recalls each Monday.

When a manufacturer or the NHTSA determines that a recreational vehicle or item of RV equipment creates an unreasonable safety risk or fails to meet minimum safety standards, the manufacturer is required to fix that vehicle or equipment at no cost to the consumer.

It should be noted that RV recalls are related to vehicle safety and not product quality. NHTSA has no interest in an air conditioner failing to cool or slide out failing to extend or retract—unless they can be directly attributed to product safety.

Information on previous safety recalls follow:

NHTSA announced 18 recall notices during February 2024. These recalls involved 6 recreational vehicle manufacturers— Forest River (9 recalls), Winnebago (2 recalls), Tiffin (2 recalls), Jayco (2 recalls), Gulf Stream (1 recall), MCI (1 recall), and Foretravel (1 recall).

Campground USA, Apache Junction, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2020-2023 Coachmen Galleria, 2021-2023 Forest River Beyond, and 2021-2023 Coachmen Nova Class B motorhomes. The retractable awning may extend unintentionally during transit.

Dealers will install a wedge to support the internal components in the gearbox and replace the motor as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 5, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-825-6319. Forest River’s number for this recall is 225-1723.

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2024 Coachmen Clipper and Viking Travel Trailers. The tail light bezel may not have been installed on the vehicle. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 108, “Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Associated Equipment.”

Dealers will install the tail light bezel, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 6, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-269-467-4600. Forest River’s number for this recall is 120-1729.

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2023-2024 Prism Class C motorhomes. The furnace may overheat and cause a crack in the burn chamber, which can allow carbon monoxide to enter the cabin.

Dealers will install the correct cold air return, grill, and heating ducts as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 6, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-825-8602. Forest River’s number for this recall is 215-1730.

Settlers Point RV Resort, Washington, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2023-2024 Coachmen Prism Class C motorhomes. The furnace may overheat and cause a crack in the burn chamber, which can allow carbon monoxide to enter the cabin.

Dealers will install the correct cold air return grill as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 6, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-825-8602. Forest River’s number for this recall is 215-1733.

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2023-2024 Salem and Wildwood fifth wheel travel trailers. The Federal Placard may have incorrect tire size information. As such, these trailers fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 120, “Wheels and Rims – Other Than Passenger Cars.”

Dealers will mail new federal placards, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 13, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-534-3167. Forest River’s number for this recall is 69-1731.

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2024 Coachmen Catalina and Forest River Aurora travel trailers. The tire may contact the slide adjustment bolt and puncture the tire.

Dealers will replace the slide adjustment bolt and install a shackle kit, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 20, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River customer service at 1-574-825-4995. Forest River’s number for this recall is 205-1735.

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2023-2024 Coachmen Concord motorhomes. The lower control arm bracket may fail and cause the axle to rotate or detach, resulting in a loss of vehicle control.

Dealers will replace the lower control arm mount, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 20, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River customer service at 1-574-825-8602. Forest River’s number for this recall is 210-1734.

Padre Island National Seashore, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2019-2024 Georgetown and FR3 Class A motorhomes. The liquid petroleum gas (LPG) tank mounting brackets may break which can result in the LPG tank becoming dislodged and damaged.

Dealers will inspect and replace the brackets and welds as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 23, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-206-7600. Forest River’s number for this recall is 68-1736.

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2015-2017 Sanibel SNF3550 and 2021-2023 Sanibel SNF3902WB fifth wheels. The hitch (pin box) may not be sufficient for the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) and may fail.

Dealers will install a properly rated hitch, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 27, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-862-1025. Forest River’s number for this recall is 49-1737.

Winnebago

Winnebago Towable (Winnebago) is recalling certain 2024 Access travel trailers. The breakaway switch and trailer brakes may not activate when needed due to an incorrectly wired breakaway switch.

Winnebago will rewire the breakaway switch, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 9, 2024. Owners may contact Winnebago customer service at 1-574-825-5280 ext. 5220. Winnebago’s number for this recall is CAM0000034.

Winnebago

Winnebago Towable (Winnebago) is recalling certain 2022-2023 Micro Minnie, Micro Minnie FLX, Hike 200, and Minnie travel trailers. The LED backlight circuit board in the cooktop range may fail, causing the board to overheat.

The remedy is currently under development. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 29, 2024. Owners may contact Winnebago customer service at 1-574-825-5280 ext. 5220. Winnebago’s number for this recall is CAM0000035.

Whispering Hills RV Park, Georgetown, Kentucky © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Tiffin

Tiffin Motorhomes, Inc. (Tiffin) is recalling certain 2023-2024 Convoy and GH-1 motorhomes. The bracket that secures the solar panel to the roof may crack and break, which can cause the solar panel to detach.

Dealers will replace the brackets, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 22, 2024. Owners may contact Tiffin customer service at 1-256-356-8661. Tiffin’s number for this recall is TIF-136.

Tiffin

Tiffin Motorhomes, Inc. (Tiffin) is recalling certain 2022-2024 Allegro Bay motorhomes. The standard house batteries may shift position during travel, which can cause the battery terminals to contact the steel hold-down bar.

Dealers will install a new battery hold-down bar and angle brackets, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed April 1, 2024. Owners may contact Tiffin customer service at 1-256-356-8661. Tiffin’s number for this recall is TIF-137.

Jayco

Jayco, Inc. (Jayco) is recalling certain 2023 Entegra Expanse, Expanse LI, Jayco Solstice, and Solstice LI motorhomes. The retractable awning may extend unintentionally during transit.

Dealers will install a wedge to support the internal components in the gearbox and replace the motor as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 29, 2024. Owners may contact Jayco customer service at 1-800-283-8267. Jayco’s number for this recall is 9903601.

Jayco

Jayco, Inc. (Jayco) is recalling certain 2020-2023 Entegra Anthem, Aspire, Cornerstone, and Reatta XL motorhomes. The pedestal mounting plate on the driver’s seat may be improperly welded, causing the plate to separate and the seat assembly to loosen or detach. As such, these seat assemblies fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) number 207, “Seating Systems” and number 210, “Seat belt assembly anchorages.”

Dealers will inspect for a missing weld and replace the pedestal as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 1, 2024. Owners may contact Jayco customer service at 1-800-283-8267. Jayco’s number for this recall is 9903602.

River Sands RV Resort, Ehrenburg, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Gulf Stream

Gulf Stream Coach, Inc. (Gulf Stream) is recalling certain 2024 Trail Boss 160FK trailers. The incorrect tire size and tire pressure are listed on the federal certification label. As such, these trailers fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 110, “Tire Selection and Rims” and 49 CFR Part 567, “Certification.”

Dealers will mail replacement federal certification labels to customers, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 1, 2024. Owners may contact Gulf Stream customer service at 1-800-289-8787. Gulf Stream’s number for this recall is 106FK/23

MCI

Motor Coach Industries (MCI) is recalling certain 2014-2018 D4000, 2013-2019 D4005, 2013-2023 D4500, 2013-2020 D4505, and 2021-2024 D45CRTLE coaches equipped with a Ricon wheelchair lift. The red beacon lighting on the Threshold Warning System (TWS) may not be bright enough. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 403, “Platform Lift Systems.”

MCI will work with Ricon to replace the TWS kits, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 29, 2024. Owners may contact MCI customer service at 1-800-241-2947.

Orange Groove RV Park, Bakersfield, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Foretravel

Foretravel, Inc. (Foretravel) is recalling certain 2023 Realm FS605 and Realm Presidential FS605P vehicles. The steering gear may have foreign material inside the gear that could build pressure within the system, resulting in a loss of power steering assist.

Foretravel will work with the chassis manufacturer, Shyft Group to replace the steering gears, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed April 03, 2024. Owners may contact Foretravel customer service at 1-800-955-6226.

Please Note: This is the 60th in a series of posts relating to RV Manufacturers Recalls

Worth Pondering…

It is easier to do a job right than to explain why you didn’t.

—Martin Van Buren

RVing through the Seasons: Tips and Considerations

Traveling in an RV is an unparalleled experience. There’s almost no bad time of year to travel.

Some consider RVing to be a seasonal activity. Many part-time RVers de-winterize their RV as things warm up in preparation for the summer vacation season. After a fun season of RVing, they winterize and store the RV again when the weather turns cooler.

But RVing can continue throughout the year. Each season has its beauty and unique draws. There are special things to see and do in each season that can only be experienced during that time of year. But along with those fun experiences also come some considerations to keep in mind. Various tips and tricks can enable you to get the most out of RVing through all the seasons.

Whether you are a full-timer or take your RV out on a part-time basis for fun adventures, I hope the information below helps you enjoy RVing throughout the year.

Spring wildflowers in Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Spring

Ah, springtime. When the warmer weather comes, the travel itch isn’t far behind.

Spring is an amazing time to hit the road in your RV. The bugs aren’t in full force yet. The days are warm and the evenings cool—which is perfect for campfires. The waterfalls are at their most powerful. And the campgrounds aren’t packed yet. 

Springtime is a time of growth and renewal with a lot of exciting things to see and experience. As many RVers leave their winter destinations or bring their RVs out of storage if not full-time, it’s an excellent time to do some inspection and care of your RV and continue to hit the road for more adventures.

Spring wildflowers in Mississippi © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Spring tips & tricks

Spring is a time to de-winterize your RV if applicable and check for any new leaks that have potentially formed over the winter. Even if not, it is an opportunity to do some spring cleaning inside and out and take time for routine or annual maintenance.

Watch out and be prepared for the severe weather that occurs in some areas in the spring. With winter thawing and springtime rains encountering mud or flooding is more common.

Mexican poppies © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Road trips & destinations for spring travel

View Mexican poppies and other wildflowers in southern California and Arizona, bluebonnets in central Texas, tulips in the Skagit Valley of northwestern Washington, and cherry blossoms in Washington, DC.

It was 1947 when the Cleveland Indians and New York Giants first decamped to Arizona for pre-season warm-ups in spring, kicking off a tradition that now brings 15 MLB teams to take up temporary residence in the Phoenix area.

After Washington, DC’s famed cherry blossoms have peaked, you can still get your flower fix with a trip to Virginia’s stunning Shenandoah National Park with its 850 species of wildflowers.

Prairie dogs, white-tailed and mule deer, pronghorn antelope, mountain goats, elk, and bighorn sheep roam free in South Dakota’s Custer State Park. Come spring, you may even cross paths with the newest additions to the park—baby wildlife.

>> Read more on RV travel in spring:

The Breakers, Newport, Rhode Island © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Summer

Summertime means summer travel, especially among the RV-loving set. These three bright, beautiful months offer some of the very best motorhome and travel trailer adventures possible.

Summer is all about hitting the road with your friends or family to explore somewhere new.

If you’re planning an RV getaway with family, summertime may be the best option. After all, the kids are on vacation and the warm weather gives you and your family more opportunities to have fun. How does a water-themed RV vacation sound? 

Taking an RV vacation during the summer months also gives you and your family a great chance to visit fun amusement parks during the journey. Also, if you plan well, you can prepare a travel route that also includes stops at concerts, music festivals, or sports events that the entire family can enjoy.

If you do plan to camp in your RV during the summer be prepared for crowded campgrounds and RV parks. Be sure to plan your trips early and make reservations before the campgrounds become full.

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Summer tips & tricks

It’s always a good idea to make certain preparations ahead of time including a basic itinerary, securing camping sites, and ensuring you’re up to date with your regular maintenance schedule.

Once you’ve got the maintenance out of the way, move on to your packing list. What do you need to bring aboard? Summer heat means fun activities like paddling, cycling, or hiking. Be sure to add whatever gear you need to make it happen to your packing list whether that means big equipment like a kayak or bicycle, or just your best pair of lightweight trail shoes and a wide-brimmed hat. And don’t forget the sunscreen.

A consideration for summer is that humidity can be very high during this season depending on where you recreate.

Don’t underestimate the power of a fan which helps to move the air around. This can make you feel cooler as can a cold drink. Keep the ice cubes stocked in your freezer or buy a countertop ice maker. A cool beverage can do wonders.

To maximize your outdoor shade space you can add an awning screen or room. This helps when you want to be outside at a time when the sun may be shining at an angle that your awning doesn’t block.

Kemah Boardwalk, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Road trips & destinations for summer travel

Take your family for a swim at a beach and play in the sand or get in a kayak or on a paddleboard.

Summers in Texas can be hot and humid but the cool waters of the Gulf of Mexico are inviting all year long. Galveston Island features 32 miles of beaches for those looking to relax in the sun. But the barrier island is also home to historic architecture, a vibrant art scene, excellent seafood restaurants, and fun, quirky shops.

Pigeon Forge is a family-friendly destination with something to offer visitors of all ages. Options include off-road trail rides, whitewater rafting, zip-lining, and go-karting. And when you’re ready to stretch your legs and take in some scenic views, head over to Great Smoky Mountain National Park where you’ll find hundreds of miles of hiking trails and endless roads to explore.

West Virginia is an underrated summer RV destination. The town of Fayetteville is a great place for RVers looking for outdoor adventures. One of the biggest attractions in the area is one of America’s newest national park, New River Gorge.

Banff and Jasper National Parks in Western Canada offer some of the most breathtaking scenery and impressive hiking in the world.

>> Read more on RV travel in summer:

Blue Ridge Parkway © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Fall

While summer is the peak season for most campers and RVers, fall might be a better time to hit the road. From mid-September through early November, temperatures are milder, humidity is lower, campgrounds and RV parks are less crowded, fall foliage is ablaze, and pesky bugs like mosquitos and black flies are not as prevalent.

Additionally, water temperatures are still warm and fishing conditions improve. The weeks after Labor Day (the unofficial end of summer) are an excellent time to travel in your RV. Also, Halloween presents some very attractive options during this season. 

For many RVers, autumn is considered the perfect season for RVing. During this well-loved season, the leaves change colors and fall to the ground as the air becomes crisper with cooler temperatures that are just right for traveling in an RV. It’s also typically less busy than the summer travel season allowing many to avoid crowds and long lines. If you’re looking for a great time to take your family on vacation, fall is definitely it!

Stowe Community Church, Vermont © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Fall tips & tricks

Fall can best be enjoyed by just making a few adjustments to maximize your enjoyment of RVing during cooler weather. Get out your cooler weather clothes as the season changes.

A couple chairs, a cozy blanket, and a campfire are all you need to sit outside for hours.

Some may say it’s not a campfire if it’s not a wood fire but a propane fire pit can be a game changer. A propane campfire can be turned on or off at a moment’s notice and campfire smoke is never a problem.

Slow cookers are useful for RVers year-round but are especially handy in cooler weather when we have the urge for warm soups and other hearty meals. After a full day of exploring the fall foliage come back to your campsite and an RV already smelling amazing from an almost ready slow-cooked meal.

Be sure to check ahead on any campgrounds you plan to stay in as fall progresses. Make sure they remain open and haven’t turned off the water if you are planning on needing that.

Whitehall, New York © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Road trips & destinations for fall travel

The northeast is an easy answer for where to RV in the fall with its vibrant fall leaves in all colors. Not only does the northeast do fall colors right but the covered bridges and maple syrup farms and products feel quintessentially fall.

Head to Acadia National Park in Maine but leave enough time to sufficiently explore Vermont and New Hampshire as well. Visit a sugar house such as Sugarbush Farm to try their maple syrup. Come back in the spring to see the full maple season production but the sugar house is open all year. Read exhibits and take a walking path through the woods. Here you will see how the trees are tapped and the sap lines are run.

Colorful falls are certainly not exclusive to the northeast. You could follow the colors south along the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Great Smoky Mountains for more fall colors.

Whereas the above mentioned areas showcase leaves of all colors, there is just something about the bright yellow aspen leaves of Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. You will be treated to a sea of gold as the hillsides are blanketed in golden leaves.

Wherever you travel, there are apple or pumpkin orchards, farms, and farmers markets with fall’s harvest bounty, corn mazes, and other fall festivities to be enjoyed.

>> Read more on RV travel in fall:

Winter camping © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Winter

Snowflakes falling, blanketing the landscape in white, puffy coats, warm hats, and hot chocolate all come to mind when thinking of winter. There is a reason for the term winter wonderland. Winter can be beautiful but in an RV it can often present the most challenges.

Winter tips & tricks

In winter, all things are made easier if you can avoid the extremes and have an RV that is at least somewhat capable of cold-weather camping.

If you camp in the cold, you’ll need to prepare for it. If you’re hooking up to city water, you’ll need a heated hose that plugs into an AC outlet at your campsite. A heated hose keeps water from freezing at the source while it’s flowing into your RV. 

Because hot air rises and cold air sinks, floors often feel extra chilly, especially in the morning. Fortunately, there are several ways to insulate under your feet such as interior rugs and runners, carpet tiles, and floor mats.

Your propane furnace is the most efficient way to heat the inside and underbelly of your RV. Another option is a portable electric space heater. Electric heaters can supplement your RV furnace if you’re plugged into AC power. They can conserve propane and lower your energy bill depending on the electric costs in your location. 

And many RVers escape the cold like a snowbird and have some fun in the sun.

Snowbirds head south for winter. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Road trips & destinations for winter travel

Winter favorites for RVers include Florida, Arizona, California, and Texas. Each snowbird destination has pros and cons. For example, during winter the Southeast enjoys a humid, warm tropical climate but in return for that shorts and sandals weather you will get to deal with humidity and fire ants. On the other hand, Western snowbirds will pay for sunny afternoons with prickly plants, wind storms, dust, and chilly nighttime temperatures.

Before choosing a destination, consider the type of climate and landscapes you enjoy as well as the environmental conditions you are most and least willing to tolerate.

>> Read more on RV travel in winter:

Enchanted Rock State Natural Area, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

 General tips for all seasons

There are a couple of additional tips for RVing throughout the year that apply to all seasons and not already mentioned above.

A weather app that you can have access to on your phone is useful year-round to be aware of weather and be notified of storms and any severe weather. This can help you decide whether to travel to an area if it is time to leave or even immediately seek safe shelter.

Make sure that your RV and other vehicles are up to date on their maintenance and care ready for the season and safe traveling. You don’t want your home-on-wheels or mode of transportation to break down on the way or present safety issues to you or your family.

Check out the seasonal and regional food in the areas you travel. Each time of year brings in-season fruits and vegetables that are fresh and flavorful and special dishes and treats are often available to enjoy local and seasonal specialties.

Look for season-specific and themed festivals and events as you travel. This may help to determine which time of year to visit a place so that we are there in time to enjoy a certain experience.

Conclusion

I could go on and on about the benefits of RVing in each of the seasons, ways to maximize your RVing throughout the year, and list out wonderful places to visit. Hopefully, this post has given you some ideas for your RV trips or maybe made you want to see a part of the country in a season you hadn’t previously considered.

Worth Pondering…

Live in each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influence of the earth.

—Henry David Thoreau, Walden

What is a Class B + Motorhome?

Class B + motorhome? Hmmm…

In general, when the various classes of motorhomes are discussed, Class A, B, and Cs are covered. But motorhomes are limited to Class A, B, and C rigs. Or are they?

We know that Class A motorhomes are the largest and most luxurious of the three classes of motorhomes (with diesel pushers sitting at the top of that class), Class B is the smallest (often referred to as a campervan), and Class C is the middle child usually distinguished by a bed or entertainment center/storage covering the entire area over the cab.

But you may have heard of a newer class of motorhomes notably the Class B +. But what exactly is a Class B + motorhome, how will you know one when you see one, and why might you want one?

In today’s post, I’m covering the ins and outs of the Class B + motorhome—what it is, how it differs from Class A, B, and C motorhomes, and what would it cost to buy one?

Class B+ motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is a Class B + motorhome?

From the perspective of federal regulations, a Class B + motorhome is technically a Class C motorhome. Let’s say that again for the sake of clarity.

A Class B + is technically not in a class of its own but is instead a type of Class C motorhome. All federal regulations that apply to Class C motorhomes apply to the Class B + category of motorhomes, too.

Now that I’ve dropped that little bombshell and absorbed that interesting information, let’s look at what makes a motorhome a Class B +.

As you might imagine, the term Class B + refers to a motorhome that sits somewhere between Class B and Class C. Like Class C, the B + is wider than Class B and is built on a truck chassis.

Unlike Class C motorhomes, the Class B Plus doesn’t have a bunk (or storage/entertainment area) stretching over the cab. And that obvious structural difference is pretty much how you can tell the difference between a Class B Plus motorhome and a Class C motorhome when you see one driving down the road.

Class B+ motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What’s the difference between a Class B and Class B +?

As I’ve established, a Class B + is built on a truck chassis. A Class B motorhome on the other hand is built from a van. Often referred to as a camper van, Class Bs are essentially long, high-top vans made into motorhomes with all (or most of) the features of a larger rig but in a smaller package. The traditional Class B contains all of the features of a motorhome within the van body without any additional walls, floors, or roofs added in.

As a result, Class B motorhomes pack their bathrooms into tight spaces which is why most have a wet bath—that is, a shower, toilet, and tiny sink occupying one small space (and yes, they all get wet when the showers used, hence the term wet bath).

Class B motorhomes typically have smaller refrigerators, two-burner propane stovetops, and storage everywhere there’s a space for things to be stored. They usually don’t have the space for a dedicated dinette but they do often have front captain’s seats that swivel around to face the rear of the motorhome and small tables (sometimes one in the front and a second in the back) that can be placed in use or stored.

Class B + rigs can be laid out somewhat similarly but because they’re wider, longer, and taller, differences are afforded by the additional space. For example, a Class B + might have a little dinette, a larger refrigerator, a slide, and sleep 1-2 more people than a Class B motorhome could sleep. (All of this depends on where you obtain your information. More on that in a moment!)

One of the most appreciated features of a Class B + compared with a Class B is that a Class B + is often large enough to accommodate a dry bath, that is, a separate toilet and shower area (so you’re not showering all over the little sink and toilet as you would in a wet bath).

Class B + rigs also tend to offer more storage on both the interior and exterior of the motorhome and somewhat larger fresh, gray, and black holding tanks as well. In addition, the larger chassis affords the Class B + motorhome more towing capacity and a greater GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating).

When reviewing the differences between a Class B and B + it’s easy to see why the Class B + is technically classified as a member of the Class C family. The B + is quite clearly more like a Class C than a Class B.

Class B+ motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

How big are Class B+ motorhomes?

A typical Class B + motorhome is between 23 feet and 25 feet in length but they can be longer. They’re generally easy to park and maneuver through city streets or over terrain that may be a bit more remote.

There are versions of the Class B + that are able to accommodate a slide or two offering even more room to the interior living space. The larger the Class B + rig is, the larger the holding tanks tend to be and the more storage and sleeping capacity the rig affords.

Most Class B + motorhomes come with exterior storage large enough to accommodate such things as bicycles, kayaks (especially inflatable ones), and golf clubs. And, they’re typically designed to comfortably travel and sleep 2-4 people whereas Class C motorhomes are large enough to accommodate more.

With all of that said, if you do a little research online, you’ll find lots of conflicting information on Class B + rigs. Some articles say they’re built for no more than two people. Others say the larger units have slides and plenty of room to sleep four or more.

The truth is this: The Class B + evolved from requests from folks in the market for a Class C-sized rig who were asking for a Class C without the over-cab piece. So a Class C-sized motorhome with a cutaway truck chassis was designed and the term Class B + was born strictly as a marketing tool.

That’s right—it’s a made-up marketing term to indicate the design difference and to appeal to a particular audience. (Reminder: these so-called Class B Plus rigs are technically Class C motorhomes.)

So, it’s no wonder that the details of Class B + motorhomes vary depending on who’s reporting. A Class B + isn’t so much a specific entity as it is a marketing tool.

Features and amenities of a Class B + motorhome

Class B + rigs are often marketed as small luxury RVs with many of the amenities of a Class A rig, only smaller. Class B + motorhomes are indeed often high-end, small motorhomes for sure (and their prices tend to reflect this—more on that in the next section).

A Class B + motorhome has a permanent bed, most often a queen though some manufacturers have begun to offer Murphy beds which make for additional interior space during the day. Some are all-wheel-drive and many have features such as lighted awnings, roof-mounted solar panels and inverters, larger refrigerators than their Class B counterparts, entertainment centers with storage over the back of the cab area, dinette lounges, high-end galley (kitchen) amenities, and fairly spacious showers.

Many of the Class B + motorhomes offer European design with sleek exterior lines and relatively fine interior finishes.

Class B+ motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

How much does a Class B+ cost?

Many people look toward the Class B + as a nice midway between the smaller, van-like Class B and larger, more boxy Class C motorhomes with what they suspect will be lower cost compared with the Class Cs. Not so!

Class B + motorhomes are often priced quite high running anywhere from around $90,000 to upward of $300,000. It’s a big price range that’s largely dependent on the model, amenities, and manufacturer.

A Class B + motorhome may afford you a sweet ride and a relatively luxurious small motorhome but it won’t offer you a budget RV by any means and it won’t save you money over a Class C. Class C motorhomes are almost always less expensive than Class B + motorhome. 

How many people can a Class B+ sleep?

I touched on this earlier in the article but most Class B + motorhomes are designed to accommodate two adults and maybe a small child or two comfortably (in the converted dinette) though some manufacturers offer floor plans that can sleep three or four adults.

Class B+ motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Are Class B + motorhomes good for full-time living?

This is a tough question for someone who lives in a 38-foot diesel pusher. I prefer a fair amount of room for full-time living, working, and traveling (although I’d happily downsize if there was a 35-foot Class A diesel pusher floorplan we wanted).

Conclusion

Despite the fact that it’s sort of a fake class created as a marketing tool that belongs to the Class C family, a Class B + motorhome is a great traveling rig with just the right amenities for the right travelers. Larger and therefore roomier than a Class B and less boxy and top-heavy than a Class C, the Class B + offers plenty of comfort and ease of driving that delivers just the right balance for many RV owners and renters.

Worth Pondering…

Genius is the ability to reduce the complicated to the simple.

—C.W. Ceran

January 2024 RV Manufacturer Recalls: 12 Recalls Involving 7 RV Manufactures

A manufacturer recall can create a safety risk if not repaired

Your recreational vehicle may be involved in a safety recall, creating a safety risk for you or your passengers. A certified dealer must repair Safety defects at no cost to you. However, if left unrepaired, a potential safety defect in your vehicle could lead to injury or even death.

What is a recall?

It’s always important to keep up with the latest recalls, no matter how small the issue may appear to be. Each week, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) publishes the latest information on recalls from minor to major defects. NHTSA releases its most recent list of recalls each Monday.

When a manufacturer or the NHTSA determines that a recreational vehicle or item of RV equipment creates an unreasonable safety risk or fails to meet minimum safety standards, the manufacturer is required to fix that vehicle or equipment at no cost to the consumer.

It should be noted that RV recalls are related to vehicle safety and not product quality. NHTSA has no interest in an air conditioner failing to cool or slide out failing to extend or retract—unless they can be directly attributed to product safety.

Information on previous safety recalls follow:

NHTSA announced 12 recall notices during January 2024. These recalls involved 7 recreational vehicle manufacturers— Forest River (5 recalls), Winnebago (2 recalls), Airstream (1 recall), Heartland (1 recall), Newmar (1 recall), Tiffin (1 recall), and Brinkley (1 recall).

Pichacho Peak State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2020 Cherokee travel trailers. The draw bar locking mechanism may break, which can cause the front end of the trailer to contact the road.

The remedy is currently under development. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 14, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River customer service at 1-574-825-4995. Forest River’s number for this recall is 95-1705.

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2020-2024 Coachmen Galleria motorhomes. The battery boost wiring may become damaged, resulting in an electrical short circuit and causing a loss of power steering.

Dealers will relocate the wiring to a different lug, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 14, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-825-6319. Forest River’s number for this recall is 225-1716.

Clinton/Knoxville North KOA, Tennessee © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2024 Shasta Oasis travel trailers. The side marker lights may not reflect light as intended, which can make it difficult for other drivers to see the trailer. As such, these trailers fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 108, “Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Associated Equipment.”

Dealers will replace the marker lights, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 28, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-821-1311. Forest River’s number for this recall is 53-1724.

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2023-2024 No Boundaries (NOBO), RPOD, and IBEX trailers. The fasteners for the independent suspension may loosen, allowing the independent suspension to detach.

Dealers will inspect the fasteners and replace or secure them as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 28, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-642-1612. Forest River’s number for this recall is 51-1727.

Padre Island National Seashore, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2024 Coachmen Nova Class B motorhomes. The liquid level remote fill gauge on the propane tank may leak when in the “Open” position.

Dealers will replace the bleed valve on the propane tank, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 4, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-825-6225. Forest River’s number for this recall is 225-1696.

Winnebago

Winnebago Towable (Winnebago) is recalling certain 2021-2023 Micro Minnie FLX travel trailers. The spare tire carrier may fail when loaded with a certain off-road style tire.

Dealers will replace the spare tire carrier, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed January 19, 2024. Owners may contact Winnebago customer service at 1-574-825-5280 ext. 5220. Winnebago’s number for this recall is CAM0000033. This recall is an expansion of NHTSA recall 23V270

Gulf State Park, Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Winnebago

Winnebago Industries, Inc. (Winnebago) is recalling certain 2021-2023 Ekko motorhomes. The blind spot monitoring system may fail without warning to the driver.

Dealers will install a new blind spot monitoring system, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 16, 2024. Owners may contact Winnebago customer service at 1-641-585-6939 or 1-800-537-1885.

Airstream

Airstream, Inc. (Airstream) is recalling certain 2022-2023 Basecamp 20X travel trailers. The spare tire carrier bracket may experience metal fatigue and break, allowing the spare tire to detach from the trailer.

The remedy is still under development. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 17, 2024. Owners may contact Airstream customer service at 1-877-596-6505 or 1-937-596-6111 ext. 7401 or 7411.

Sundance 1 RV Resort, Casa Grande, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Heartland

Heartland Recreational Vehicles, LLC (Heartland) is recalling certain 2024 Corterra fifth wheels. The certification labels may have missing or incorrect tire size information. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 120, “Wheels and Rims-Other Than Passenger Cars.”

Heartland will send out replacement certification labels, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 15, 2024. Owners may contact Heartland customer service at 1-877-262-8032.

Newmar

Newmar Corporation (Newmar) is recalling certain 2022-2023 Dutch Star, Mountain Aire, London Aire, Essex, and 2016 London Aire motorhomes. The pedestal mounting plate may be improperly welded, causing the plate to separate and the seat assembly to loosen or detach. As such, these seat assemblies fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) number 207, Seating Systems,”, and number 210, “Seat belt assembly anchorages.”

Dealers will inspect for a missing weld, and replace the pedestal as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters were mailed January 31, 2024. Owners may contact Newmar customer service at 1-800-731-8300. Newmar’s number for this recall is 608 RSB.

Vista del Sol RV Resort, Bullhead City, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Tiffin

Tiffin Motorhomes, Inc. (Tiffin) is recalling certain 2022 Allegro Bus, Phaeton, Allegro Red 360, and Zephyr motorhomes. The pedestal mounting plate on the driver’s seat may be improperly welded, which can cause the plate to separate and the seat assembly to loosen or detach.

Dealers will inspect for a missing weld and replace the pedestal, as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed March 22, 2024. Owners may contact Tiffin customer service at 1-256-356-8661. Tiffin’s number for this recall is TIF-135.

Brinkley

Brinkley RV (Brinkley) is recalling certain 2024 Model Z recreational vehicles. The axle spindle weld may fail, resulting in the wheel assembly detaching from the axle.

Dealers will inspect and replace the axles as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed in January 2024. Owners may contact Brinkley customer service at 1-574-501-4280. Brinkley’s number for this recall is REC-2401.

Please Note: This is the 59th in a series of posts relating to RV Manufacturers Recalls

Worth Pondering…

It is easier to do a job right than to explain why you didn’t.

—Martin Van Buren

Gas or Diesel Motorhome: Which is Better?

Which is better, a gas or diesel motorhome? That’s one of the biggest questions RV buyers need to answer. It’s important to ask and answer before buying a motorhome.

“Should I get a gas or diesel motorhome?” It’s a question that will repeat itself through the ages as long as we have fuel.

Maybe electric or another option will be added to the comparison charts in the future. In other countries, propane is a cheaper fuel. It’s used in many hybrid cars although it is rarely used in the U.S. and Canada  For now, it’s gas versus diesel.

RVers love to argue about the best RV fuel. Gas versus diesel motorhomes is the topic of many campfire circles. But we can’t argue until we understand the features and benefits of each type.

Let’s take a look.

A gas-powered motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Gasoline powered motorhomes

Gasoline is the most used fuel.  It is easily combustible which allows for quick starts and fast acceleration.  It is also the leading contributor to pollution. According to AAA, nearly 1/5 of all emissions come from vehicles. Your engine determines which grade of gasoline you can use. You have regular (87), premium (91), and mid-grade (89).

A diesel-powered motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Diesel powered motorhomes

Diesel is more fuel efficient. In traveling, you can usually go about 20 percent farther on a gallon of fuel than gas-powered vehicles. This is one reason why you will see most truckers with diesel engines. It also produces less carbon dioxide. But, it still creates nitrous oxide which causes smog.

There are six things to consider. I’ll go through them one by one.

A gas-powered motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

1. The mechanical basics

For those who might not know the difference between diesel and gas engines, it’s worth spending a little time talking about the basics.

Without being overly technical, the first and perhaps most notable difference is the thermal efficiency of diesel engines which refers to the work that can be expected to be produced by the fuel put into the engine. As mentioned above, a diesel engine is about 20 percent more thermally efficient than a gas engine. That means a 20 percent increase in fuel economy.

Diesel engines also run at a much slower RPM (revolutions per minute) than gas engines. Slower RPM translates to less wear and tear and a longer life cycle for the engine.

Further, increased thermal efficiency also translates to more power and torque. A diesel engine’s high torque application is very beneficial for hauling heavy loads.

Gas engines, on the other hand, deliver a much higher volatility point but a lower flashpoint. A spark controls the combustion of a gas engine. Diesel engines do not use a spark but what’s called a compression combustion engine.

Essentially, a gasoline engine is a spark-fired combustion and a diesel engine utilizes compression.

Now that you have some background on the differences between gas and diesel engines, let’s look at the pros and cons of each about RVing.

A diesel-powered motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

2. Costs of gas vs diesel motorhomess

The first consideration for many people shopping for a new RV is the price. Simply put, does it fit your budget?

On the whole, diesel-powered motorhomes are much more expensive than gas-powered motorhomes. For that reason, first-time motorhome buyers often decide to go with a less expensive gas-powered RV rather than a diesel or luxury unit.

However there are various degrees of quality within each type. Depending on what you are looking for, the best gas motorhomes on the market stack up against some lower-quality diesel units.

However, well maintained diesel engines have a longer life than gasoline ones and can still perform reliably after extensive mileage. This means diesel-powered motorhomes tend to retain their value longer and have higher resale values than gas-powered units.

A gas-powered motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

3. Differences in mileage

As mentioned above, the second factor to take into consideration is the fuel economy. After all, fuel is expensive and adds up over time. Here are the main differences in mileage between gas-powered and diesel-powered rigs.

Gas-powered motorhomes:

  • Depending on chassis, gas motorhomes will have between 80-100 gallon tanks (Class A) and 20-30 gallon tanks (Class B)
  • Average of 6-10 mpg (Class A), 10-14+ mpg (Class B and Class C)
  • Widespread availability at all fuel stations
  • Less expensive than diesel
  • Gas has an odor when burned; the smell can fill the cabin
  • Gas has a shorter shelf life due to evaporation

Diesel-powered motorhomes:

  • Depending on the chassis will have between 80-150 gallon tanks
  • Average of 6-18 miles per gallon with Class Cs and A motorhomes getting less, Class Bs and B+ RVs getting more
  • More expensive than gas
  • Diesel is available at most but not all stations but maneuverability presents a problem for most diesel pushers (Class A motorhomes)
  • Diesel has better fuel efficiency meaning less frequent refills at the pump
  • Diesel burns cleaner than gas
A diesel-powered motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

4. Maintenance

Gas engines are easier to maintain and repair compared with their diesel counterparts. If you have a general knowledge of gas engines, you can probably do the bulk of the repairs and maintenance yourself.

A downside of a gas engine is that it runs at higher RPMs meaning it will always be working harder than a diesel engine. Running at higher RPMs allows for a smoother, quieter ride with faster acceleration but more frequent upkeep is required.

Diesel engines are considerably more expensive to maintain and require specialized training to service. Diesel engines run at a lower RPM meaning slower acceleration and lower top speeds but less strain on the engine and you can drive more miles between servicing.

A diesel-powered motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

5. Oil 

All engines require oil. Diesel-powered engines use a lot more oil than gas-powered engines but the oil only needs to be replaced once a year or every 12,000-15,000 miles (depending on the chassis). You’ll need to change the oil in a gas engine every six months or less.

In a gas engine, if you know how to change oil you can do it yourself. Diesel oil changes are more complicated, so you’ll probably have to take it to a professional mechanic to do the work.

A diesel-powered motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

6. Speed and towing ability of gas vs diesel RVs

Gas-powered engines typically have higher horsepower and less torque so you can accelerate and maintain higher speeds. However, having less torque adds more strain on the engine while towing and climbing inclines.

Diesel-powered engines are designed for higher torque at lower speeds but are not as fast as gas engines. More torque means slower acceleration speeds but greater towing power and ease in steep inclines.

As you can see, there are some pros and cons to both styles of engines but ultimately the decision for you boils down to personal preference and your budget.

Are you planning on carrying a toad? Do you frequent the Rockies and the Northwest Mountains? Having the power to climb hills with a load lends to diesel-powered engines.

Or are you planning on RVing without a toad and in relatively flatter areas such as Florida and Louisiana? In that case, a gas-powered engine would work well for you.

A gas-powered motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Gas or diesel: The bottom line

Simply put, the bottom line on gas or diesel comes down to your particular situation and preference.

YOU are the most important factor when it comes to the best RV fuel option. 

All the miles you drive, where you drive, how you manage your fuel usage, cost of ownership, how long you plan to keep your RV, resale value, and your RV maintenance habits affect you more in the long run. Hopefully, if you already own an RV, it meets your needs. 

We are RVers! We aren’t like everyone else already and neither does our fuel use have to be like everyone else’s. Whether we choose a motorhome that uses gasoline or one that uses diesel, the RV itself should match our travel needs. 

Every RVer’s bottom line is different. If you don’t plan to travel as many miles or aren’t concerned about resale value then a gas-powered RV might suffice for you.

Worth Pondering…

Get your motor runnin’
Head out on the highway
Lookin’ for adventure
And whatever comes our way
Yeah Darlin’ go make it happen
Take the world in a love embrace
Fire all of your guns at once
And explode into space.

Born To Be Free, words and music by Mars Bonfire

Common RV Interior Design Flaws + Solutions

The most common RV interior design flaws and what the RV design industry should do about it is the topic of this timely post

As a nearly $30 billion dollar industry, you can only imagine how much money and man-hours go into designing functional and attractive interiors in the RV Industry. But sometimes even the best plans don’t translate to the best real-world results. The only real way to know what works and what doesn’t is to turn to the people using it.

RVers learn to adapt to the tiny lifestyle coming up with all kinds of clever solutions and hacks. God bless the RV designers who have given us a good head start but there’s always some kind of impracticality to overcome.

Living room and kitchen areas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The most common issues with RVs

Most issues revolve around the kitchen, laundry, shoe storage, and accessibility.

I think the solutions for these problems are certainly achievable even if they’re offered as options instead of standard features.

Impractical oven

Some people love their oven but many find the oven to be too small or too ineffective to be worth the space it takes. It seems many RVers are content to use convection microwaves or air fryers in their place.

Here are some suggestions for RV designers:

  • Option for convection microwave and dishwasher drawer instead of an oven
  • Option for 9-in-1 built-in air fryer instead of an oven
  • Larger oven that can hold at least a small turkey

Understandably, preferences can vary widely when it comes to ovens and cooking. So, it really seems the best solution is to have more options! Let the RVer have more of a say in their cooking appliances when they purchase an RV.

Micro-wave and kitchen © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

More counter space

RV designers have tried to maximize counter space without encroaching into the living space too much. Two main solutions they’ve come up with are boards that cover the stovetop and sink when not in use. While these are helpful sometimes, they aren’t really useful when you’re in full cooking mode.

After all, isn’t it while you’re cooking when you need the most counter space? You end up having to push those boards aside when, say, sauce is simmering on the stove and pasta is draining in the sink. That just takes up more room, not create more.

The most sensible solutions seem to be:

  • Sturdy pull-out boards
  • Sturdy flip-up boards from side of cabinet
  • Pull-down shelf from underneath the cabinets

I particularly like the pull-down shelf idea as it seems we just need more room to set things down that we take out of the pantry or fridge. The pull-down shelf takes advantage of the vertical space making a pseudo-double-decker counter. Once the ingredients are put away, the shelf hinges right back underneath the cabinet.

Living room with pull-out table and built-in desk © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Adjustable shelves (and more shelves)

Adjustable shelves seem like such a simple solution… because they are! I’d bet it’s one of the cheapest yet most effective changes every RV manufacturer could implement in every class and model. This problem came up with both pantry and closet storage.

Take advantage of vertical space and what better way to do that with shelves. Being able to customize the height based on the products you store would be a HUGE help.

And designers shouldn’t be stingy with the shelves!  Give us at least a couple more shelves to work with!

Drop-down upper storage

A lot of storage in RVs is in the form of small cabinets above the couch. It turns out that a lot of people either because of their height or their age have a hard time reaching these spaces. They’re high up plus we have to reach over a couch. Yet, these cabinets often store the everyday items we need to get to often.

It seems like one of the best solutions follows that same idea as the pull-down kitchen shelf―make these small storage cabinets hinge down and out towards us.

Bedroom with overhead cupboards © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Dirty laundry hamper

Where do we put the dirty laundry?

Maybe RV designers haven’t heard that we’re not supposed to air our dirty laundry because they haven’t given us a good place to put it.

We need a designated place for dirty laundry that’s not the shower space!

Shoe storage

Where to put all the shoes?

Shoe storage! Shoe storage! Shoe storage!

It seems everyone agrees we need more of it. Yes, there are after-market door hangers but why not integrate shoe storage into RV design?

It makes sense to incorporate shoe storage by the front door. We all end up leaving shoes by our doors and they become a tripping hazard. A cubby or space for a couple of pairs of shoes by the entrance door would be ideal.

Some models have this near-the-door shoe storage now. If this is important to you, make sure you check to see if the model you are viewing has it.

Living room with pull-out table and built-in desk © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Better accessibility

The RV Lifestyle is about freedom and discovery and it should be possible for people with disabilities and mobility issues. Not to mention, a big part of the RV community is seniors that are only getting older.

Newmar has wheelchair accessible luxury diesel motorhomes and Winnebago has several models they called accessibility enhanced.

One of the biggest obstacles for people with disabilities and seniors with more limited mobility is the front entrance. The big steps become a serious safety hazard if not a complete blockade to the inside.

RVers would like more options when it comes to how they enter their RV. Some suggestions include:

  • An electric lift (like a miniature version of moving truck lifts)
  • A slide-out ramp
  • More graduated steps
  • Swing-out or collapsible hand rail alongside steps

The next biggest area of concern in this area was a more realistic emergency exit for seniors. Many older people worry about the idea that they might someday have to escape through the escape window. Would they really be able to get out the window? Would they hurt themselves doing so?

A second emergency exit door in lieu of an emergency window seems like an option many people would pay extra for.

Worth Pondering…

Genius is the ability to reduce the complicated to the simple.

—C.W. Ceran

December 2023 RV Manufacturer Recalls: 6 Recalls Involving 5 RV Manufactures

A manufacturer recall can create a safety risk if not repaired

Your recreational vehicle may be involved in a safety recall, creating a safety risk for you or your passengers. A certified dealer must repair Safety defects at no cost to you. However, if left unrepaired, a potential safety defect in your vehicle could lead to injury or even death.

What is a recall?

It’s always important to keep up with the latest recalls, no matter how small the issue may appear to be. Each week, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) publishes the latest information on recalls from minor to major defects. NHTSA releases its most recent list of recalls each Monday.

When a manufacturer or the NHTSA determines that a recreational vehicle or item of RV equipment creates an unreasonable safety risk or fails to meet minimum safety standards, the manufacturer is required to fix that vehicle or equipment at no cost to the consumer.

It should be noted that RV recalls are related to vehicle safety and not product quality. NHTSA has no interest in an air conditioner failing to cool or slide out or failing to extend or retract—unless they can be directly attributed to product safety.

Information on previous safety recalls follow:

Pueblo El Mirage RV Resort, El Mirage, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

NHTSA announced 6 recall notices during December 2023. These recalls involved 5 recreational vehicle manufacturers—Forest River (2 recalls), Grand Design (1 recall), Tiffin (1 recall), Keystone (1 recall), and REV (1 reall).

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2024 XLR Boost toy haulers. The taillights may be insufficiently reflective. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 108, “Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Associated Equipment.”

Dealers will install reflector stickers, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed January 17, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-642-0432. Forest River’s number for this recall is 79-1711.

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2023-2024 Coachmen Concord CNC321DSF motorhomes. The air suspension air line may be incorrectly installed near the exhaust, which can cause a sudden loss of rear suspension.

Dealers will re-route the air lines and 12-volt wiring away from the vehicle exhaust, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed January 24, 2024. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-825-8602. Forest River’s number for this recall is 210-1714.

Sand Hollow State Park, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Grand Design

Grand Design RV, LLC (Grand Design) is recalling certain 2024 Reflection travel trailers. The electrical plug blade openings (narrow hot blade and wider neutral blade) may be reversed on one of the two receptacle outlet faces, which can cause outlet failure.

Dealers will replace the incorrect receptacles, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed January 5, 2024. Owners may contact Grand Design customer service at 1-574-825-9679. Grand Design’s number for this recall is 910041.

Tiffin

Tiffin Motorhomes, Inc. (Tiffin) is recalling certain 2024 Allegro Open Road and Allegro Bay motorhomes. The 32-inch hard line LPG hose fitting may not fit correctly, which can cause a fuel leak.

Dealers will replace the 32-inch hose with a 40-inch hose, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed January 28, 2024. Owners may contact Tiffin customer service at 1-256-356-8661. Tiffin’s number for this recall is TIF-134.

Keystone

Keystone RV Company (Keystone) is recalling certain 2021-2022 Dutchmen Coleman 1855RB and 190BH travel trailers. The trailers may be equipped with axle springs rated at 4400 pounds instead of 5100 pounds.

Dealers will replace the axle springs, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed January 25, 2024. Owners may contact Keystone customer service at 1-866-425-4369. Keystone’s number for this recall is 23-447.

Settlers Point RV Resort, Washington, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

REV

REV Recreation Group (REV) is recalling certain 2016-2023 American Coach American Eagle motorhomes. Turbulence may loosen or break the rear air deflector mounting bracket hardware.

Dealers will replace the attachment hardware bracket and fasteners, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed February 3, 2024. REV’s number for this recall is 231205REV.

Please Note: This is the 58th in a series of posts relating to RV Manufacturers Recalls

Worth Pondering…

It is easier to do a job right than to explain why you didn’t.

—Martin Van Buren

November 2023 RV Manufacturer Recalls: 13 Recalls Involving 8 RV Manufactures

A manufacturer recall can create a safety risk if not repaired

Your recreational vehicle may be involved in a safety recall and may create a safety risk for you or your passengers. Safety defects must be repaired by a certified dealer at no cost to you. However, if left unrepaired, a potential safety defect in your vehicle could lead to injury or even death.

What is a recall?

It’s always important to keep up with the latest recalls, no matter how small the issue may appear to be. Each week, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) publishes the latest information on recalls from minor to major defects. NHTSA releases its most recent list of recalls each Monday.

When a manufacturer or the NHTSA determines that a recreational vehicle or item of RV equipment creates an unreasonable safety risk or fails to meet minimum safety standards, the manufacturer must fix that vehicle or equipment at no cost to the consumer.

It should be noted that RV recalls are related to vehicle safety and not product quality. NHTSA has no interest in an air conditioner failing to cool or slide out failing to extend or retract—unless they can be directly attributed to product safety.

Information on previous safety recalls follow:

NHTSA announced 13 recall notices in November 2023. These recalls involved 8 recreational vehicle manufacturers—Forest River (4 recalls), Winnebago (2 recalls), Gulf Stream (1 recall), Jayco (2 recalls), Thor Motor Coach (1 recall), Triple E (1 recall), Airstream (1 recall), and Newell (1 recall).

Poche’s RV Park, Breaux Bridge, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2023-2024 Sandstorm, Stealth, and 2024 Shockwave travel trailers. The wire routed from the 50AMP inlet to the transfer switch in the distribution panel is the incorrect gauge, which may cause the wire to melt.

Dealers will replace the incorrect 10-gauge wire with a 6-gauge wire, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed December 13, 2023. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-951-357-2327. Forest River’s number for this recall is 67-1700.

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2018-2024 Coachmen Adrenaline and 2020-2024 Work and Play fifth wheels and travel trailers. The side marker lights may not reflect light as intended, which can make it difficult for other drivers to see the trailer. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 108, “Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Associated Equipment.”

Dealers will install reflector stickers, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed December 13, 2023. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-825-6302. Forest River’s number for this recall is 320-1697.

Sundance 1 RV Resort, Casa Grande, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2022-2024 Forester and Sunseeker motorhomes. The park brake signal wire may not be connected to the house battery control center, which can allow the slideroom to extend during transit.

Dealers will connect the signal wire to the battery control center, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed December 27, 2023. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-206-7600. Forest River’s number for this recall is 34-1707.

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2022-2024 Forester and Sunseeker motorhomes. The park brake signal wire may not be connected to the house battery control center, which can allow the slideroom to extend during transit.

Dealers will connect the signal wire to the battery control center, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed December 27, 2023. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-206-7600. Forest River’s number for this recall is 34-1707.

Winnebago

Winnebago Industries, Inc. (Winnebago) is recalling certain 2024 Solis motorhomes. The fasteners that secure the sliding seat in the extended position are missing. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 207, “Seating Systems.”

Dealers will install the missing fasteners, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed December 23, 2023. Owners may contact Winnebago customer service at 1-641-585-6939 or 1-800-537-1885. Winnebago’s number for this recall is 180.

Winnebago

Winnebago Towable (Winnebago) is recalling certain 2017-2018 Micro Minnie travel trailers. The murphy bed may raise unintentionally if there is weight at the head of the bed and the button strap is not properly latched.

Dealers will install a new automatic latching mechanism, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed January 5, 2024. Owners may contact Winnebago customer service at 1-574-825-5280 ext. 5220. Winnebago’s number for this recall is CAM0000031.

Palm Springs Joshua Tree KOA, Desert Hot Springs, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Gulf Stream

Gulf Stream Coach Inc. (Gulf Stream) is recalling certain 2024 Conquest, Independence, Trailmaster, Friendship, and Ameri-Lite, model 177BH, travel trailers. The Federal certification label may contain incorrect tire size and tire pressure information. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 110, “Tire Selection and Rims,” and 49 CFR Part 567, “Certification.”

Gulf Stream will mail replacement labels to owners, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed December 4, 2023. Owners may contact Gulf Stream at 1-800-289-8787.

Jayco

Jayco, Inc. (Jayco) is recalling certain 2023-2024 Jayco White Hawk travel trailers. A window may be incorrectly marked as an emergency exit.

Dealer will replace the red handle and red screen knob and remove the exit decal, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed December 8, 2023. Owners may contact Jayco customer service at 1-800-283-8267. Jayco’s number for this recall is 9901596.

Sea Breeze RV Park, Portland, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Jayco

Jayco, Inc. (Jayco) is recalling certain 2023-2024 Entegra Emblem, Vision, Vision XL, Jayco Alante, Precept, and Precept Prestige motorhomes. Corrosion in the Smart Data Link Connector (SDLC) may interfere with the Controller Area Network (CAN) communication, resulting in an inoperative instrument panel. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard numbers 101, “Control and Displays” and 105, “Hydraulic and Electric Brake Systems.”

Ford dealers will install a wire harness connector, and inspect and replace the SDLC module, as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed December 15, 2023. Owners may contact Jayco customer service at 1-800-283-8267.

Thor Motor Coach

Thor Motor Coach (TMC) is recalling certain 2021-2024 Thor Rize and Scope motorhomes. The solar panel frame may fracture around the mounting bolts, allowing the panel to detach from the vehicle.

The remedy is currently under development. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed January 9, 2024. Owners may contact TMC customer service at 1-877-855-2867. TMC’s number for this recall is RC000298

Triple E

Triple E Recreational Vehicles (Triple E) is recalling certain 2023-2024 Triple E Wonder W24RTB, W24RL, and W24FTB motorhomes. The wire insulation on the 120-volt wire routed to the air conditioner may become damaged, which can cause electrical arcing.

Dealers will install a grommet and 2 screws, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed November 21, 2023. Owners may contact Triple E customer service at 1-877-992-9906. Triple E’s number for this recall is CA#10438-1.

Airstream

Airstream, Inc. (Airstream) is recalling certain 2019-2024 Interstate 19, Interstate 24, Interstate 24X, Rangeline and Atlas motorhomes. The Federal Certification Label and Tire Placard may indicate incorrect tire pressure and tire size. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 110, “Tire Selection and Rims.”

Airstream will mail corrected labels, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed January 16, 2024. Owners may contact Airstream customer service at 1-877-596-6505 or 1-937-596-6111 ext. 7401 or 7411.

Newell

Newell Coach Corp. (Newell) is recalling certain 2024 P50 motor coaches. The low beam headlights may be installed incorrectly.

Dealers will adjust the low beam headlights, free of charge. The manufacturer has not yet provided a schedule for recall notification. Owners may contact Newell customer service at 1-888-363-9355.

Please Note: This is the 57th in a series of posts relating to RV Manufacturers Recalls

Worth Pondering…

It is easier to do a job right than to explain why you didn’t.

—Martin Van Buren

September 2023 RV Manufacturer Recalls: 6 Recalls Involving 4 RV Manufactures

A manufacturer recall can create a safety risk if not repaired

Your recreational vehicle may be involved in a safety recall and may create a safety risk for you or your passengers. Safety defects must be repaired by a certified dealer at no cost to you. However, if left unrepaired, a potential safety defect in your vehicle could lead to injury or even death.

What is a recall?

It’s always important to keep up with the latest recalls, no matter how small the issue may appear to be. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) publishes the latest information on recalls from minor to major defects each week. NHTSA releases its most recent list of recalls each Monday.

When a manufacturer or the NHTSA determines that a recreational vehicle or item of RV equipment creates an unreasonable safety risk or fails to meet minimum safety standards, the manufacturer is required to fix that vehicle or equipment at no cost to the consumer.

It should be noted that RV recalls are related to vehicle safety and not product quality. NHTSA has no interest in an air conditioner failing to cool or slide out or failing to extend or retract—unless they can be directly attributed to product safety.

Information on previous safety recalls follow:

NHTSA announced 6 recall notices in September 2023. These recalls involved 4 recreational vehicle manufacturers—Forest River (3 recalls), Triple E (1 recall), Airstream (1 recall), and Winnebago (1 recall).

Rain Spirit RV Resort, Cottonwood, Arizona© Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2024 Sabre fifth wheels. The Federal Placard indicates an incorrect cargo carrying capacity (CCC) and dry weight, which can result in an overloaded vehicle. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 120, “Wheels and Rims-Other Than Passenger Cars” and 49 CFR Part 567 “Certification.”

Dealers will mail owners a new Federal Placard, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed October 11, 2023. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-260-499-2100. Forest River’s number for this recall is 62-1671

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2022 Della Terra Travel Trailers and Silver Lake travel trailers. The sidewall extrusion may not have been properly installed, which can cause the aluminum siding to detach.

Dealers will inspect and replace the sidewall metal as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed October 11, 2023. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-264-6664. Forest River’s number for this recall is 500-1672.

Rio Bend RV & Golf Resort, El Centro, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2024 Palomino hardside and softside truck campers. An unnecessary charge line may have been connected to the lithium battery.

Dealers will disconnect the charge line and install bell caps, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed October 25, 2023. Owners may contact Palomino customer service at 1-269-432-3271. Forest River’s number for this recall is 400-1677.

Triple E

Triple E Recreational Vehicles (Triple E) is recalling certain 2021-2022 Unity U24IB and 2021-2023 U24TB motorhomes. The battery disconnect switch may contact the refrigerator frame, causing it to short circuit and blow the fuse.

Dealers will install a full protective plastic cover, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed September 8, 2023. Owners may contact Triple E customer service at 1-877-992-9906. Triple E’s number for this recall is CA#10253-1R. This recall supersedes NHTSA Recall 23V002.

Frog City RV Park, Duson, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Airstream

Airstream, Inc. (Airstream) is recalling certain 2021-2023 16′ Basecamp and 20′ Basecamp travel trailers manufactured without an air conditioner. The 12-gauge wire for future air conditioner installation was not properly terminated inside the junction box.

Dealers will remove the wire from the circuit breaker and power converter, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed October 31, 2023. Owners may contact Airstream customer service at 1-877-596-6505 or 1-937-596-6111 ext. 7401 or 7411.

Hacienda RV Resort, Las Cruces, New Mexico © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Winnebago

Winnebago Industries, Inc. (Winnebago) is recalling certain 2017-2024 Travato motorhomes. The retractable awning may extend unintentionally during transit.

The remedy is currently under development. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed November 7, 2023. Owners may contact Winnebago customer service at 1-574-585-6939 or 1-800-537-1885. Winnebago’s number for this recall is 176. This recall replaces and expands NHTSA Recall 22V-696. Motorhomes previously repaired under 22V-696 will need to have the new remedy completed.

Please Note: This is the 55th in a series of posts relating to RV Manufacturers Recalls

Worth Pondering…

It is easier to do a job right than to explain why you didn’t.

—Martin Van Buren

August 2023 RV Manufacturer Recalls: 12 Recalls Involving 9 RV Manufactures

A manufacturer recall can create a safety risk if not repaired

Your recreational vehicle may be involved in a safety recall and may create a safety risk for you or your passengers. Safety defects must be repaired by a certified dealer at no cost to you. However, if left unrepaired, a potential safety defect in your vehicle could lead to injury or even death.

What is a recall?

It’s always important to keep up with the latest recalls, no matter how small the issue may appear to be. Each week, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) publishes the latest information on recalls from minor to major defects. NHTSA releases its most recent list of recalls each Monday.

When a manufacturer or the NHTSA determines that a recreational vehicle or item of RV equipment creates an unreasonable risk to safety or fails to meet minimum safety standards, the manufacturer is required to fix that vehicle or equipment at no cost to the consumer.

It should be noted that RV recalls are related to vehicle safety and not product quality. NHTSA has no interest in an air conditioner failing to cool or slide out failing to extend or retract—unless they can be directly attributed to product safety.

Information on previous safety recalls follow:

NHTSA announced 12 recall notices during August 2023. These recalls involved 9 recreational vehicle manufacturers— Forest River (3 recalls), Airstream (2 recalls), Chinook (1 recall), Tiffin (1 recall), Starcraft (1 recall), Highland Ridge (1 recall), Alliance (1 recall), Grand Design (1 recall), and ATC (1 recall).

Buccaneer State Park, Mississippi © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2024 Sandpiper, and Sierra fifth wheels. The axle may be installed backwards, which can reduce braking ability.

Dealers will remove and reinstall the axle, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed September 13, 2023. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-534-4574. Forest River’s number for this recall is 3-1665.

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2023 Forest River Pause travel trailers. The awning may not be adequately secured, which can cause the awning to detach.

Dealers will reinstall the awning brackets on the roof, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed September 13, 2023. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-327-2681. Forest River’s number for this recall is 426-1662.

Hacienda RV Resort, Las Cruces, New Mexico

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2024 Coachmen Beyond, Galleria, and Nova motorhomes, equipped with certain SmartPlug 30-Amp Shore Power Inlets. The manganese bronze D-rings may crack or fail when over-tightened.

Dealers will install a new smart plug, free of charge. Owner notification letters were mailed August 16, 2023. Owners may contact Forest River customer service at 574-825-6319. Forest River’s number for this recall is 225-1669.

Airstream

Airstream, Inc. (Airstream) is recalling certain 2023-2024 Bambi, Basecamp, Caravel, Flying Cloud, Globetrotter, International, and Interstate travel trailers. The SmartPlug 30 Amp inlet manufactured with the manganese bronze D-rings may crack or fail when properly tightened.

Dealers will inspect and replace the SmartPlug 30-amp inlet as needed, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed September 25, 2023. Owners may contact Airstream customer service at 1-877-596-6505 or 1-937-596-6111 ext. 7401 or 7411.

The Barnyard RV Park, Lexington, South Carolina © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Airstream

Airstream, Inc. (Airstream) is recalling certain 2019-2023 Ford Transit, 2020 RAM, and 2020-2022 Sprinter recreational vehicles upfitted by Creative Mobile Interiors. The fuel hose between the inline fuel filter and the injection pump module (IMP) may have inadequate clamp force, possibly resulting in a gasoline leak.

Dealers will inspect and replace the fuel hose and clamps as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed September 25, 2023. Owners may contact Airstream customer service at 1-877-596-6505 or 1-937-596-6111 ext. 7401 or 7411.

Chinook

Chinook Motor Coach, LLC (Chinook) is recalling certain 2020-2024 Bayside motorhomes, equipped with certain Cummins Onan QG 2800i, and Onan QG 2800i EVAP generator sets. The fuel hose between the inline fuel filter and the Injection Pump Module (IPM) may have inadequate clamp force, possibly resulting in a gasoline leak.

Cummins dealers will inspect and replace the fuel hose and clamps, as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed August 4, 2023. Owners may contact Chinook customer service at 1-574-584-3756.

Cedar Creek Campground, Badlands National Park, South Dakota © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Tiffin

Tiffin Motorhomes, Inc. (Tiffin) is recalling certain 2023 Phaeton motorhomes, equipped with Cummins L9 diesel engines. The remote Stage 2 fuel filter hoses may have been damaged during production, allowing the hoses to leak or disconnect.

Cummins dealers will replace both hoses, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed September 15, 2023. Owners may contact Tiffin customer service at 1-256-356-8661. Tiffin’s number for this recall is TIF-132.

Starcraft

Starcraft RV (Starcraft) is recalling certain 2023 Super Lite Maxx travel trailers. The trailers may have been manufactured without a secondary emergency exit window.

Dealer will inspect and install an emergency egress window, as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed September 8, 2023. Owners may contact Starcraft customer service at 1-800-283-8267. Starcraft’s number for this recall is 9902990.

Katy Lake RV Resort, Katy, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Highland Ridge

Highland Ridge RV (Highland Ridge) is recalling certain 2023-2024 Highland Ridge Range Lite Air travel trailers. The trailers may have been manufactured without a secondary emergency exit window.

Dealer will inspect and install an emergency egress window as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed September 8, 2023. Owners may contact Highland Ridge customer service at 1-800-283-8267. Highland Ridge’s number for this recall is 9904990.

Alliance

Alliance RV, LLC (Alliance) is recalling certain 2023-2024 Paradigm 295MK, 310RL, 340RL, 370FB, 382RK, 385FL, 390MP, and 395DS travel trailers. The breakaway switch and trailer brakes may not activate when needed due to an incorrectly wired breakaway switch.

Dealers will rewire the breakaway cable, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed October 10, 2023. Owners may contact Alliance customer service at 1-574-218-7165.

Leaf Verde RV Park, Buckeye, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Grand Design

Grand Design RV, LLC (Grand Design) is recalling certain 2022-2024 Momentum 23G and 25G travel trailers. The installed safety chains are underrated for the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR).

Dealers will replace the safety chains, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed September 6, 2023. Owners may contact Grand Design customer service at 1-574-825-9679. Grand Design’s number for this recall is 910040.

ATC

Aluminum Trailer Company (ATC) is recalling certain 2022-2023 PL700 trailers. The wire connections in the transfer switch may be tightened improperly and loosen.

Dealers will tighten the wire connections, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed August 28, 2023. Owners may contact ATC customer service at 1-877-441-2440 ext. 342.

Please Note: This is the 54th in a series of posts relating to RV Manufacturers Recalls

Worth Pondering…

It is easier to do a job right than to explain why you didn’t.

—Martin Van Buren