May 2021 RV Manufacturer Recalls

A manufacturer recall can create a safety risk if not repaired

Your recreational vehicle may be involved in a safety recall and may create a safety risk for you or your passengers. Safety defects must be repaired by a certified dealer at no cost to you. However, if left unrepaired, a potential safety defect in your vehicle could lead to injury or even death.

Rain Spirit RV Resort in Cottonwood, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is a recall?

When a manufacturer or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) determines that a recreational vehicle or item of RV equipment creates an unreasonable risk to safety or fails to meet minimum safety standards, the manufacturer is required to fix that vehicle or equipment at no cost to the consumer.

NHTSA releases its most recent list of recalls each Monday.

It should be noted that RV recalls are related to vehicle safety and not product quality. NHTSA has no interest in an air conditioner failing to cool or slide out failing to extend or retract—unless they can be directly attributed to product safety.

NHTSA announced 13 recall notices during May 2021. These recalls involved 9 recreational vehicle manufacturers—Airstream (4 recalls), Forest River (2 recalls), Keystone (1 recall), Tiffin (1 recall), Jayco (1 recall), Triple E (1 recall), Gulf Stream (1 recall), and VanLeigh (1 recall), MCI (1 recall).

River Run RV Park in Bakersfield, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Airstream

Airstream, Inc. (Airstream) is recalling certain 2021 Interstate 19 touring coaches. The wiring harness for the radio may have an undersized wire.

Airstream will notify owners, and dealers will replace the circuit breaker to limit the current passing through the wire to prevent an overload condition, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin June 20, 2021. Owners may contact Airstream customer service at 1-877-596-6505 or 1-937-596-6111 ext. 7401 or 7411.

Hacienda RV Resort in Las Cruces, New Mexico © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Airstream

Airstream, Inc. (Airstream) is recalling certain 2020-2021 Interstate vehicles. The Federal Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) may have incorrect occupant cargo carrying capacity weight listed. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 120, “Wheels and Rims-Other Than Passenger Cars” and 49 CFR Part 567, “Certification.”

Airstream will notify owners, and provide a new label, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin June 20, 2021. Owners may contact Airstream customer service at 1-877-596-6505 or 1-937-596-6111 ext. 7401 or 7411.

Seven Feathers Casino RV Resort in Canyonville, Oregon © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Airstream

Airstream, Inc. (Airstream) is recalling certain 2020-2021 25RB Flying Cloud, 28RB Flying Cloud, 30RB Flying Cloud, 25RB International, 28RB International, and 30RB International trailers. The stove top range was incorrectly installed in a non-sealed cabinet.

The remedy is still under development. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed July 11, 2021. Owners may contact Airstream customer service at 1-877-596-6505 or 1-937-596-6111 ext. 7401 or 7411.

The Barnyard RV Park in Lexington, South Carolina © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Airstream

Airstream, Inc. (Airstream) is recalling certain 2020-2021 Globetrotter travel trailers. The adhesive on the overhead cabinet doors may fail.

Dealers will inspect and replace the cabinet doors as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed July 6, 2021. Owners may contact Airstream customer service at 1-877-596-6505 or 1-937-596-6111 ext. 7401 or 7411.

Airstream, Inc. (Airstream) is recalling certain 2019-2021 Interstate Nineteen vehicles. The buss bar circuit breaker may have been incorrectly wired.

Dealers will relabel and relocate wires, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed July 11, 2021. Owners may contact Airstream customer service at 1-877-596-6505 or 1-937-596-6111 ext. 7401 or 7411.

Texas Lakeside RV Park in Port Lavaca, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling 2021 Coachmen Catalina travel trailers. A wire with the incorrect gauge was routed from the battery and may melt.

Forest River will notify owners, and dealers will replace the wire, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed by June 2, 2021.. Owners may contact Forest River customer service at 1-574-825-8657. Forest River’s number for this recall is 203-1327.

Las Vegas RV Park in Las Vegas, Nevada © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2021 Coachmen Spirit Travel Trailers. The Breakaway switch power lead is wired incorrectly and may lose power.

Dealers will rewire the breakaway switch, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed June 23, 2021. Owners may contact Forest River customer service at 1-574-825-8205. Forest River’s number for this recall is 220-1336.

Columbia Sun RV Resort in Kennewick, Washington © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Keystone

Keystone RV Company (Keystone) is recalling certain 2021 Passport 282QB, 2400RB, 2704RK trailers. The safety chains installed are underrated for the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR).

Keystone will notify owners, and dealers will replace the safety chains, free of charge. Owners expected to begin getting notified June 11, 2021. Owners may contact Keystone customer service at 1-866-425-4369. Keystone’s number for this recall is 21-410.

Leaf Verde RV Park in Buckeye, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Tiffin

Tiffin Motorhomes, Inc. (Tiffin) is recalling certain 2017-2021 Bus and Phaeton vehicles. The sealing washer may not seat correctly in the pilot bore, allowing the high pressure fuel rail assembly to leak.

The remedy for this recall is still under development. Owner notifications are expected to begin June 19, 2021. Owners may contact Tiffin customer service at 1-256-356-8661.

Lake Osprey RV Resort in Elberta, Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Jayco

Jayco, Inc. (Jayco) is recalling certain 2021 Travel Trailer Jay Feather Micro trailers. The spare tire carrier could break at the bend radius or gusset.

Dealers will install two Z-brackets, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed June 4, 2021. Owners may contact Jayco customer service at 1-800-283-8267. Jayco’s number for this recall is 9901566.

Sunrise RV Park in Texarkana, Arkansas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Triple E

Triple E Recreational Vehicles (Triple E) is recalling certain 2020-2021 Unity U24FX, U24Rl, U24MB, U24CB, U24TB, U24IB, 2020-2021 Wonder W24MB, W24FTB, W24RTB, and 2020 Serenity S24CB recreational vehicles. The auto generator start remote harness wires may be damaged by the generator fan.

Dealers will bundle the wires with nylon ties, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed May 10, 2021. Owners may contact Triple E customer service at 1-877-992-9906. Triple E’s number for this recall is CA#9927-1.

Destiny RV Resort in Goodyear, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Gulf Stream

Gulf Stream Coach, Inc. (Gulf Stream) is recalling certain 2021 Vista Cruiser, Vintage Cruiser, Gulf Breeze, Matrix, Streamlite, Express, Envision, and Geo travel trailers. The Federal Certification Label may have incorrect tire size and tire pressure information listed. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of 49 CFR Part 567, “Certification” and Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 110, “Tire Selection and Rims.”

Gulf Stream will mail a replacement certification label and installation instructions, free of charge. The manufacturer has not yet provided a schedule for recall notification. Owners may contact Gulf Stream customer service at 1-800-2898787.

The Lakes RV and Golf Resort in Chowchilla, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

VanLeigh

VanLeigh RV (VanLeigh) is recalling certain 2019-2021 Beacon and 2019-2022 Vilano coaches. The water heater housing may not have been properly sealed, allowing gas to enter the coach.

Dealers will install a grommet ensuring the sleeve is facing out and use zip-ties to secure the sleeves to the gas line, free of charge. The manufacturer has not yet provided a schedule for recall notification. Owners may contact VanLeigh customer service at 1-662-612-4040.

Whispering Hills RV Park in Georgetown, Kentucky

MCI

Motor Coach Industries (MCI) is recalling certain 2017-2018 D4000, 2017-2019 D4005, D4000ISTV, D4505, 2017-2020 D4500, J4500, 2018-2020 D45CRTLE, and 2018-2021 J3500 vehicles. The sealing washer may not seat correctly in the pilot bore holes, allowing the high pressure fuel rail assembly to leak.

Dealers will inspect the rail threads, and replace the rail as necessary, free of charge. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed May 31, 2021. Owners may contact MCI customer service at 1-800-241-2947. MCI’s number for this recall is R21-009.

Please Note: This is the 28th in a series of posts relating to RV Manufacturers Recalls

Worth Pondering…

It is easier to do a job right than to explain why you didn’t.

—Martin Van Buren

Is Your RV Protected from Electrical Issues?

Most RVers are not protecting their RV from electrical issues

There are four electrical issues an RVer can encounter while traveling: surges, miswired pedestals, high/low voltage, and wiring issues inside the RV.

It is unbelievable to think that 90 percent of RVs do not have any type of electrical protection system in place. We’ve had a power surge, situations where pedestals were miswired, and both high and low voltage situations. Fortunately, our Progressive Electric Management System has protected us from all of these situations.

Electric Management system attached to electric cord at pedestal © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What exactly are you protecting your RV from when you use an electrical protection device? It’s much more than power surges which we typically associate surge protectors with. Surges are actually the least common problem with RV electricity. An RV typically has a lot of sensitive electronic circuitry in it, and having steady power is crucial to keeping these components from having an early funeral. Failure of components like AC units, refrigerators, washer/dryer, and even computers plugged into a wall outlet can be very expensive to replace.

While the expense is a big deal, there are other considerations like the inconvenience of getting your RV to a repair shop. And, if you are on the road and something fails you’ll be scrambling to find a reputable repair shop. One of the best things you can do to prevent these type failures is to make sure that the power coming into your RV is monitored. Let’s look at the four areas that need to be addressed as it relates to RV electricity.

Progressive Electric Management System © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Electrical Issue #1: Surges

The first issue that most RVers think of as it relates to power coming into the RV is surge protection. A surge is a quick electrical spike that can quickly destroy anything in its path. Surge protection is rated in joules; the higher the level of joules the better the protection. When shopping for an electrical protection system take a look at the joules level, and remember, no system can completely protect you from a direct lightning strike.

Electric Management system attached to electric cord at pedestal © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Electrical Issue #2: Miswired Pedestals

A good electrical protection system will analyze the pedestal and let you know if there are any issues with the ground wire, neutral wire, and if there are any reverse polarity issues.

Let’s consider RV parks for a moment. The original design should have been professionally inspected but then the years start to pile on and over time the electrical pedestals that we plug into can begin to have problems. Thousands of RVs may have plugged into the pedestal before you and over time, pedestals can start to wear down. Wiring can come loose in the pedestal and you could lose the ground wire which can be dangerous. The neutral wire could become disconnected and put your RV in danger of up to 240 volts running to one side of your RV.

Progressive Electric Management System © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Electrical Issue #3: High/Low Voltage

Your electrical protection system should have the ability to cut you off from the power if the voltage drops too low or goes too high. Usually systems will cut off at 102-104 volts and on the high side at around 132 volts.

So, what causes a low or high voltage situation? Imagine you are at a crowded park in the middle of the summer and everyone is turning on their AC units. A low voltage situation will not always zap an appliance but it will reduce the life expectancy of an appliance over time. Low voltage and high voltage are the silent killers and dealing with this should be a part of your plan to protect your RV.

Rest assured that your electric system is fully protected © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Electrical Issue #4: Wiring Inside the RV

What if the incoming power is fine, but you have a wiring issue inside of your RV? A good electrical protection system will detect elevated ground currents and open neutral conditions in the RV. This level of protection is new to the market (within the last year) and can be found in the Surge Guard brand.

You may be protected against some of these issues with devices that were installed in your RV from the factory. But, you are not covered from all of these issues with a built-in unit from the factory. Many Diesel Pushers have some type of built in surge protector that is combined with the transfer switch. Smaller class A, B, and C motorhomes may or may not have any electrical protection built in, and fifth-wheels and travel trailers likely have nothing built into the unit.

Enjoying a sunset on the Texas Gulf Coast © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

It surprised me to learn that I did not have the protection from my built-in unit I thought I had. When I checked the model number of the built in electrical protection system and studied the manual, I found that it had nothing more than a surge protector and all of the other elements we discussed were not accounted for.

You can use one of the Progressive Electric Management Systems or Surge Guard portable units even if you have a hardwired unit installed. They will work together to protect your RV.

You don’t need electrical protection until you need it. Saving a few hundred bucks and risking damage due to your lack of electrical protection just does not make sense. I can tell you that having my Progressive Electric Management System plugged into the pedestal makes me feel a whole lot better about being protected from poor park power.

Why would any RVer not want such protection?

Worth Pondering…

As Yogi Berra said, “It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future.”

The 10 Essentials Every RV Owner Should Buy Before Their First Road Trip

Things you should never set off in your RV without

Buying your first recreational vehicle can be overwhelming. Then there’s the towing, learning to park and back up, and setting up once you arrive at your campground or RV park. That first outing can feel pretty stressful but with the right gear, it doesn’t have to be. We’re not talking about frilly gadgets like fairy lights and portable pizza ovens (though those are important too). This list is an honest roundup of the essentials you really need to keep your RV safe and comfortable. These are the essentials every new RV owner should buy before their first camping trip.

Water pressure regulator © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Water Pressure Regulator

A water pressure regulator keeps the plumbing system of your recreational vehicle fully protected from high water pressures. The problem is that high water pressure can cause damage to the RV plumbing system. A water pressure regulator is a small device useful in maintaining a safe level of psi as far as the water that enters your vehicle is concerned. While some newer vehicles are capable of handling higher pressure it is recommended all RVs stick to around 60 psi. The proper use of the device involves attaching it to the water supply of the campground first.

Do not attach it to your vehicle as doing so might only result in the bursting of the connection hose in case of really high pressure. High flow water regulators come in two basic types: adjustable and fixed. Unless you plan to use varying pressures of water for a range of applications, a fixed water regulator will suffice for your needs and provide an excellent water flow while saving you money. The two major manufacturers of water pressure regulators are Camco and Valterra.

City utility connections including water hose © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

RV Water Hose

Especially in a new RV when the fresh water tanks are sanitary and prime for drinking water, it is important that your RV water hose is rated for human consumption. But aren’t all hoses safe? No! Despite the fact that most people have drunk from the garden hose at some point, all hoses are not created equal. Your run-of-the-mill garden hose is actually not safe to drink from; it is not regulated by the Safe Drinking Water Act and can contain toxic materials that are harmful to the human body such as lead, antimony, bromine, organotin, phthalates, and BPA (bisphenol A).

RV water hoses are NSF certified so you can be confident you will have quality drinking water available. Plus, there won’t be any chemical or plastic taste. 

Heated water hose © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Keep in mind that you will want a heated water hose if you’re camping during the winter.

Disposable Vinyl Gloves

RVing can be surprisingly dirty business. One of the best ways to keep clean and sterile on the road is with vinyl or latex gloves. Disposable gloves keep your hands clean when emptying your holding tanks. Gloves fit right or left hand. One size fits all; also available in small, medium, and large. Available at RV dealers, stores that sell RV supplies, pharmacies, and Walmart.

Progressive Emergency Management System © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Electrical Protection System

When looking at an electrical protection system for your RV, you want to make sure it is more than a surge protector and monitors high and low voltage. This is what the Progressive Emergency Management System does and what models like Surge Guard and other brands do as well. When looking at an electrical protection system, be certain to consider the protection levels. Here is what you need out of a great electrical protection system:

  • Surge Protection
  • High and Low Voltage
  • Pedestal Analysis
  • Load side protection

While there are different electrical protection brands on the market and the Progressive EMS is the unit that we trust with our RV. Others prefer Surge Guard brand. If you do not already have an electrical protection system for your RV, take it from me and other seasoned RVers—get an electrical protection system for your RV. You can’t go wrong with a model from Progressive or Surge Guard.

Sewer hose © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

High-quality sewer hose

Some things you definitely don’t want to skimp on and your sewer hose is one of them. No one wants to be dealing with a ruptured sewer hose while on vacation. Invest in a high-end hose—your peace of mind and nasal passages will thank you.

First Aid Kit

first aid kit readily available in an emergency isn’t just a good idea—it’s a necessity for every RVer. A well-stocked first-aid kit and manual can help you respond effectively to common injuries and emergencies. You can purchase first aid kits and refills at the Red Cross store, most pharmacies, or assemble your own. Contents of a first-aid kit should include adhesive tape, antibiotic ointment, antiseptic solution or towelettes, bandages, calamine lotion, cotton balls and cotton-tipped swabs, gauze pads and roller gauze in assorted sizes, first aid manual, petroleum jelly or other lubricant, safety pins in assorted sizes, scissors and tweezers, and sterile eyewash. Familiarize yourself with the items in the first aid kit and know how to properly use them. Check your first-aid kits regularly, at least every three months, to replace supplies that have expired.

The Mayo Clinic is an excellent source for first aid information to help you during a medical emergency.

Traveling with a pet © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

If you travel with pets, pet first aid manuals are also available.

RV Toolbox

Just about anything in your RV that can snap, crack, rip loose, tear, bend, leak, spark, or fall off will do exactly that at the most inconvenient time. Something will need to be tightened, loosened, pounded flat, pried, or cut.

To help you deal with everyday problems and annoyances, maintain a well-equipped toolbox in the RV (always store on curbside).

Oops! Almost disaster. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Contents should include Phillips and Robertson head and flat-bladed screwdrivers (large, medium, small), standard and needle-nose pliers, channel-lock pliers (medium and large), 10-inch Crescent wrench, claw hammer, hobby knife with blade protector, wire cutters, tape measure, silicone sealant, Gorilla tape and glue, electrical tape, battery jumper cables, open and box-end wrenches, silicone spray, WD-40 lubricant, bungee cords, road flares/warning reflectors, fold-down shovel, stepladder, spare fuses, and heavy-duty tire pressure gauge.

Many RVers also carry a socket wrench set (standard and metric), small drill bit set and cordless drill with spare battery, and digital voltmeter.

Gorilla Tape is a brand of adhesive tape sold by the makers of Gorilla Glue, and available in several sizes and colors, including camouflage, white, and clear. Gorilla Tape can solve many problems while on the road—and you can do most anything with this stuff. RVers have used it to temporarily repair a sewer hose, keep a driver’s side window from continually falling, and even affix the coffee maker to the counter so that it doesn’t move during travel.

A camera to record a West Texas sunset © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Camera

In reality, if you have a smartphone you probably have a camera capable of capturing amazing memories wherever you go. In fact, I agree with professional photographer Chase Jarvis, who says that “the best camera is the one you have with you.” 

Other Considerations

Other considerations, supplies, and equipment include fire extinguishers (one in the galley, one in the bedroom, and one outside of the RV in a basement compartment, plus one in the toad/tow vehicle), NOAA weather radio, LED flashlights, heavy-duty whistles, emergency waterproof matches, jumper cables, ice/snow window scrapers, work gloves, and blue tarp.

Camping in Arches National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

But Not Least, Know where you’re going

Okay, okay. You likely have a destination in mind. But if you’re heading out for months on end, you might want to bring along a few suggestions.

Now hit the road already!

Worth Pondering…

I am not a product of my circumstances. I am a product of my decisions.

—Stephen Covey

Yes, YOU Can Drive an RV: What YOU Need to Know

RV driving for beginners: All the tips you need to drive an RV for the first time

If you’re new to it (or even if you’re not) driving a Class A motorhome can present a challenge. Even if you’re been driving cars and smaller vehicles for a long time, it takes practice to get used to the quirks of such a large and heavy vehicle. The following Class A motorhome driving tips will help you to stay safe on the roads and feel confident behind the wheel of your luxurious RV.

Class A motorhomes at Vista del Sol RV Resort, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is a Class A Motorhome?

Motorhomes are divided into “classes” based on their size. The average, small motorhome that you see used for road trip vacations is probably a Class C. These smaller vehicles typically weigh between 10,000 and 12,000 pounds. Class A motorhomes are the largest class and can weigh anything from 13,000 pounds up to as much as 30,000 pounds.

Even a Class C motorhome can feel unwieldy and bulky to someone who is accustomed to driving a car. Class A motorhomes are huge by comparison and they handle more like a bus than a car. The trade-off is that there is far more space for home comforts and many Class A motorhomes are just as comfortable and luxurious as a small family house.

Class A motorhome interior © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Do I need a RV License?

The idea of an “RV license” is a bit of a misnomer. The rules on vehicle licenses vary from state to state and province to province. No state currently has an explicit law that relates to the driving of RVs. States do, however, divide their licenses up into classes based upon the weight of the vehicle that the driver is handling and in some cases whether or not they have a trailer.

The sheer size of Class A motorhomes means that in some cases a motorist may need a special license to drive one. It depends on the weight of the motorhome. Let’s imagine you live in Pennsylvania. If you are driving an RV that weighs less than 26,000 pounds you don’t need a special license. If the RV weighs more than 26,000 pounds you will need a Class B non-commercial license. If you have a trailer and the weight goes over 26,000 pounds then you need a Class A non-commercial license.

Every state has different rules. Some states are more lenient than others. It’s a good idea to check the laws in your state or province and those you intend to regularly travel in before buying a large RV.

Class A motorhome at Tom Sawyer RV Park, West Memphis, Arkansas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Handling Tips and Tricks

Once you’ve cleared up the legal aspects, the next challenge is to hit the road. It takes a while to get used to handling a large motorhome but it’s worth it once you master it because you’ll be able to visit new places and see the sights in luxury free from the constraints of a hotel.

Class A motorhome on Utah Scenic Byway 12 © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Start with a Short, Easy Trip

Keep things simple for your first trip. As strange as it sounds consider a “staycation.” The last thing you want is for your first trip in your brand new RV to be marred with stress, broken itineraries or worse, a broken-down vehicle. Drive on easy roads that you’re familiar with and stay in a local campground. Give yourself plenty of time to get used to how the RV moves, how well it handles hills, how much space you need to stop, and how it turns.

Class A motorhome at Columbia Riverfront RV Park, Woodland, Washington © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Tech Makes Life Easier

When you’re sitting in a Class A motorhome you’re higher up than you are used to being in your sedan or even in a smaller motorhome. Since your vehicle is also longer and wider you need more space to turn and you’re heavier so your stopping distances are longer. You need to take this all into account and it can take a while for your brain to adjust when it comes to judging distances. You’ll also have blind spots that are bigger than the ones you’re accustomed to in the mirrors of a standard car.

The good news is that there are high-tech answers to some of these problems. Some Class A motorhomes offer driving assist technology such as back up cameras, lane tracking, and adaptive steering. They make parking, backing up, and other maneuvers much easier.

Class A motorhome at Whispering Oaks RV Park, Weimar, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Don’t Fight the Vehicle

Modern motorhomes have many nice “quality of life” features such as power steering, auto-leveling, improved suspension, and ABS. Take advantage of these. Be gentle on the steering, drive slowly and steadily, and give yourself plenty of space for any turns you need to take. Remember that ABS is designed to cut your stopping distance but in a very heavy vehicle you still have a lot of inertia especially on downward slopes. 

If you’re nervous about handling an RV, consider taking classes. Many companies offer rentals and classes where you can practice driving in a controlled environment to build your confidence.

Class A motorhome on Padre Island National Seashore, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Take Regular Breaks

Remember that you don’t have to get to your destination on a fixed schedule when you’re on a road trip. If you’re held up for a while, that’s not a crisis. You quite literally have a house behind you. If you’re feeling tired, stressed, or slightly concerned, pull over at the next rest area or truck stop and take a break. Get your co-pilot to take over the driving for a while if they’re able to do so. If not, just take a nap, go for a short walk, and then start driving again.

Don’t drive in difficult conditions such as heavy rain, fog, snow, ice, or excessive wind. If you don’t like driving late at night, rest. The point of owning a luxury motorhome is to do things on your terms. Take your time and get to your destination safely then enjoy your holiday.

Class A motorhome at Coastal Georgia RV Resort, Brunswick, Georgia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Worth Pondering…

No matter where we go in our motorhome, that sense of independence is satisfying. We have our own facilities, from comfortable bed to a fridge full of our favorite foods. We set the thermostat the way we like it and go to bed and get up in our usual routine.

April 2021 RV Manufacturer Recalls

A manufacturer recall can create a safety risk if not repaired

Your recreational vehicle may be involved in a safety recall and may create a safety risk for you or your passengers. Safety defects must be repaired by a certified dealer at no cost to you. However, if left unrepaired, a potential safety defect in your vehicle could lead to injury or even death.

Wind Creek Casino RV Park, Atmore, Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is a recall?

When a manufacturer or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) determines that a recreational vehicle or item of RV equipment creates an unreasonable risk to safety or fails to meet minimum safety standards, the manufacturer is required to fix that vehicle or equipment at no cost to the consumer.

NHTSA releases its most recent list of recalls each Monday.

It should be noted that RV recalls are related to vehicle safety and not product quality. NHTSA has no interest in an air conditioner failing to cool or slide out failing to extend or retract—unless they can be directly attributed to product safety.

NHTSA announced 10 recall notices during April 2021. These recalls involved 7 recreational vehicle manufacturers—Forest River (2 recalls), Keystone (2 recalls), Tiffin (2 recalls), Winnebago (1 recall), Jayco  (1 recall), Starcraft (1 recall), and Newmar (1 recall).

Sonoran Desert RV Park, Gila Bend, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2021 Berkshire Class A motorhomes. The brake lights may not adequately reflect light. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) number 108, “Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Associated Equipment.”

Forest River will notify owners, and will provide a Reflex Reflector for the brake lights, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin May 8, 2021. Owners may contact Forest River customer service at 1-574-522-1368. Forest River’s number for this recall is 40-1315.

River Run RV Park, Bakersfield, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2021 Forest River Rockwood and Flagstaff fifth wheels recreational vehicles. The pin box may be under-rated for the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) of the vehicle.

Forest River will notify owners, and dealers will inspect, and if necessary replace the pin box, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin May 14, 2021. Owners may contact Forest River customer service at 1-574-642-8943. Forest River’s number for this recall is 10C-1319.

Harvest Moon RV Park, Adairsville, Georgia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Keystone

Keystone RV Company (Keystone) is recalling certain 2021 Passport 282QB trailers equipped with a rear compartment door. The spare tire is mounted to the rear wall in a way that obstructs the view of the left taillight.

Keystone will notify owners, and dealers will relocate the spare, free of charge The recall is expected to begin June 4, 2021. Owners may contact Keystone customer service at 1-866-425-4369. Keystone’s number for this recall is 21-405.

On-Ur-Way RV Park, Onawa, Iowa © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Keystone

Keystone RV Company (Keystone) is recalling 2020-2021 Dutchmen Aspen Trail 2760THS, 3250THS, and 3251THS trailers. The ramp door fasteners may be installed improperly causing them to strip.

Keystone will notify owners, and dealers will inspect the hinge fasteners and add nuts with a lock washer, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin June 4, 2021. Owners may contact Keystone customer service at 1-866-425-4369. Keystone’s number for this recall is 21-404.

Whispering Hills RV Park, Georgetown, Kentucky © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Tiffin

Tiffin Motorhomes, Inc. (Tiffin) is recalling certain 2021 Phaeton recreational vehicles. The valve stem stabilizer can become loose, allowing the valve stem extender to contact the wheel.

Tiffin will notify owners, and dealers will replace the valve stem stabilizer, free of charge. The manufacturer has not yet provided a schedule for recall notification. Owners may contact Tiffin customer service at 1-256-356-8661. Tiffin’s number for this recall is TIF-114.

Frog City RV Park, Duson, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Tiffin

Tiffin Motorhomes, Inc. (Tiffin) is recalling certain 2021 Phaeton motorhomes, equipped with a roof mounted passenger side awning. A roof mounted body panel may have been improperly attached to the roof.

Tiffin will notify owners, and dealers will inspect and, if necessary, properly adhere the body panel, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin June 7, 2021. Owners may contact Tiffin customer service at 1-256-356-8661. Tiffin’s number for this recall is TIF-115.

Seven Feathers Casino RV Resort, Canyonville, Oregon © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Winnebago

Winnebago Towable (Winnebago) is recalling certain 2020 Minnie. The incorrect tire size was printed on the Tire and Loading Information label. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard number 110, “Tire Selection and Rims.”

Winnebago will notify owners, and supply a corrected label and instructions on how to apply the label, free of charge. Dealers will install the corrected label if owners are uncomfortable applying the label themselves. The manufacturer has not yet provided a schedule for recall notification. Owners may contact Winnebago customer service at 1-574-825-5280 ext. 5220.

The Barnyard RV Park, Lexington, South Carolina © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Jayco

Jayco, Inc. (Jayco) is recalling certain 2019-2020 Jayco Alante, Precept, Greyhawk, Redhawk, Entegra Esteem, and Odyssey motorhomes equipped with Dometic 3 burner cooking stoves. The saddle valve securing bolt may be overtightened, possibly damaging the o-ring seal and causing a continuous gas leak.

Jayco will notify owners, and Dometic service centers will install a remedy kit of gaskets, washers, thread locker bolts, and two round orange labels, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 16, 2021. Owners may contact Jayco customer service at 1-617-776-0344. Jayco’s number for this recall is 9903566.

Sun Outdoors Pigeon Forge RV Park, Sevierville, Tennessee © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Starcraft

Starcraft RV (Starcraft) is recalling certain 2019-2020 Starcraft Mossy Oak, GPS, Mossy Oaklite, Autum Ridge, and Launch Outfitter travel trailers equipped with Dometic 3 burner cooking stoves. The saddle valve securing bolt may be overtightened, possibly damaging the o-ring seal and causing a continuous gas leak.

Starcraft will notify owners, and Dometic service centers will install a remedy kit of gaskets, washers, thread locker bolts, and two round orange labels, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 16, 2021. Owners may contact Starcraft customer service at 1-905-636-6888. Starcraft’s number for this recall is 9902566.

Buckhorn RV Resort, Kerrville, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Newmar

Newmar Corporation (Newmar) is recalling certain 2021 London Aire, Dutch Star, New Aire, Ventana, and Mountain Aire vehicles. The steering output shaft may be too short and could disengage from the steering input shaft.

Newmar will notify owners, and dealers will inspect and, if necessary, replace the steering column, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin June 11, 2021. Owners may contact Newmar customer service at 1-800-731-8300 and Shyft Group customer service at 1-800-582-3454.. Newmar’s number for this recall is 21V-214.

Please Note: This is the 27th in a series of posts relating to RV Manufacturers Recalls

Worth Pondering…

It is easier to do a job right than to explain why you didn’t.

—Martin Van Buren

Yes, You Can De-winterize your RV: Here is How

The sun is shining, the birds are chirping, and the ice has thawed—do you know what that means? It’s time to de-winterize your RV!

The snow and ice have melted, temperatures are rising, and the sun is making its way out of hibernation—it’s finally spring! And, you’ve probably itching to take your recreational vehicle out for quite some time now. But before you get too excited, you’ll need to de-winterize your RV properly for warmer weather.

Winter is over? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

While you could take your recreational vehicle to a service center, many choose to de-winterize the RV on their own. It’s not too difficult, but if you don’t follow the proper protocol you could end up discovering winter damages halfway through your first trip. Not ideal, to say the least.

So, without further ado, here’s some advice for a seamless de-winterizing process!

No more winter? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

A quick note: Make sure you stay with your RV throughout the entire de-winterizing process. It will likely take the better part of a day but if you leave in the middle of the task you might come back to an unintended swimming pool in your beloved RV.

Charge Your Batteries

When de-winterizing your RV, you’ll want to check your batteries for any wear and tear, including cracks that may have developed from frozen water. Batteries lose power in cold weather so it’s likely they’ll need to be charged and reconnected to your RV.

Prep your RV for spring travel © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Propane Power

Next step, propane power!

To start, make sure everything is turned off when testing the propane system. Then, open the valve about ¼ of an inch and check for any propane leaks by smelling the inside of the RV or by putting a soapy sponge by the connectors to see if any air bubbles appear. Assuming that you don’t find a leak, test your gas appliances and let them run for a few minutes. (It may take several minutes or more for the gas to work its way through the lines). If things shut off, try turning them back on—there may be air pockets in the line that just need to be pushed out.

Once inside the RV, also check for any water damage (this doesn’t have to do with propane but its good practice regardless). Inspect all vents and the areas surrounding the AC unit which tend to receive the most water damage. Finally, look inside cabinets and closed spaces—there may be some unwanted critters that snuck their way into your RV.

Prep your RV for spring travel © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Flush the Water System

The most important step to de-winterizing your RV is prepping the water system for use. When it comes to winterizing your RV, you probably followed one of two methods: using an air compressor to get all the water out of the vehicle or adding non-toxic antifreeze to your tank to ensure no water turned to ice over the cold winter months.

If you went the air compressor route, you won’t have to deal with draining antifreeze and can move along to prepping the water heater. If you did add antifreeze, you’ll have to make sure it’s out of your drains and into your holding tanks before you sanitize the system.

Prep your RV for spring travel © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

For the anti-freezers, connect your water hose to a fresh potable water supply and fill your tank. Then, run water through every faucet, both hot and cold. You’ll also want to test toilets, showers, the refrigerator’s ice machine, and dishwasher during this time. Once the color from the antifreeze is gone and you have clear water, you can turn off the water supply drain pressure from the system using low point drains. At this point, you can install all filters back into the system that you removed during the winterization process.

If your coach is equipped with a water heater, you’ll need to install a drain plug, open the water heater valves, and close the by-pass valve on the water heater. This ensures that your antifreeze doesn’t get into your hot water tank. Turn on the fresh water supply, open the hot water faucet until the water heater is filled, turn on your faucet, and wait until the water flows through without any air.

Prep your RV for spring travel © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Now, We Sanitize!

Next, sanitize the RV water system by using a household bleach-water mixture (roughly a quarter-cup of household bleach for every 15 gallons of water that your fresh water tank holds) and flushing it through your water system.

Prep your RV for spring travel © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

First, make sure all drains are closed (for obvious reasons). Next, fill the tank with the sanitizing mixture, turn on the pump, run it through the hot and cold faucets, close the faucets, and let it sit for at least three hours. Drain the bleach mixture, refill your fresh water tank with potable water, and flush out the system to get rid of any remaining bleach (no one wants to drink bleach water).

Finally, check your holding tank levels and dump excess waste if necessary at a suitable waste disposal site.

Not the way to care for your tires © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Check Your Tires

During the harsh winter months, your tires may have taken a beating. Check for any cracks or irregular bumps, and use a tire pressure gauge to measure the psi. (Check your user’s manual for recommended psi or utilize your RV’s tire-pressure monitoring system).

Worth Pondering…

My parents live in the part of the United States that is Canada. It is so far north that Minnesota lies in the same direction as Miami. They have four distinct seasons: Winter, More Winter, Still More Winter, and That One Day of Summer.

—W. Bruce Cameron

Get Your Rig Ready for Spring Camping

It’s spring and with the traveling season right around the corner now is the perfect time to clear out the cobwebs and tidy up your RV

Spring is right around the corner and your RV is calling. The beginning of camping season is the perfect time to assess the condition of each distinct part of your motorhome or trailer. So go ahead, break your RV out of storage.

Let the sunshine in © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

1. Let it Breathe

The first step is to open all of the windows and doors and let the fresh air take out any stale smells after being cooped up over the winter. It’s also a great idea to position the RV in a sunny spot and open up all of the blinds to let the sunshine in to help clean the air inside.

Shake it down and air it out © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

2. Shake Things Out

Take all of the pillowcases, cushions, and sofa covers out and give them a good shake outside and either put them through the laundry or leave them in the sun to get rid of the stale smells that may be clinging to them.

Time for a visual inspection © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

3. Basic Inspection & Safety Checks

One of the first things to do is make sure your RV is roadworthy is to inspect the major systems: power, propane, and tires. Do this early to allow time to schedule any necessary maintenance before it’s time to embark on your first trip. Check the battery fluid levels, adding distilled water as needed. Check the tires for proper inflation. Conduct a visual inspection of each tire for cracks along the sidewall and tread depth. Take time to inspect your fire safety systems. Make sure the carbon monoxide detector, smoke alarm, LP detector, and fire extinguishers are all in working order. Replace batteries, as required.

A clean exterior © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

4. Exterior Inspection & Wash

Walk around your RV and carefully climb up on the roof to inspect the exterior windows, doors, roof vents, and any other seams. If you find any cracks in the caulking or missing sealant, remove the old sealant and replace it.

Finally, give your RV a thorough washing using a gentle soap solution. Baby shampoo works well. Don’t forget the awnings. They are exposed to all weather conditions and rarely see sunlight on their underside making them prone to mildew especially during a long, damp winter.

Use a lamb’s wool pad or soft brush and the soap solution to clean. Be sure to rinse well and leave them out a few hours to fully dry before retracting.

Dust it down © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

5. Dust, Dust, Dust!

With a damp cloth, dust down every surface in your RV and remember to open up all of the vent covers where possible and remove the dust from inside so you can enjoy clean air when traveling. Give a good dusting behind and around all of your appliances too.

Give the interior a good clean © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

6. Clean the Cabinets, Drawers & Shelves

Give the interior a good thorough cleaning. Drain your dehumidifiers (or replace any disposables). Be sure to check inside the cabinets and under the sinks for any signs of pests or rodents.

With a warm and damp wash cloth, give all of the cabinets, drawers, and shelves a good cleaning to remove any crumbs, dirt, and grime that may have accumulated. If there are any stains, try mixing a teaspoon of baking soda with water to make a thick paste and gently apply to the stained area before wiping off.

With a clean cloth, give your fridge and freezer a thorough cleaning at this stage as well.

Now is a good time to go through all of your supplies and restock the camper with the essentials.

Windows clean again © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

7. Window Time

Systematically go through the RV washing every window, and then do the same washing the outside of each window so that you have the best views when you go out on the next adventure.

Check to ensure all things work © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

8. Check That Things Work

You should ensure that all of your air conditioning filters are clean, and while there check that each aircon vent is working. If it has been a while since the last time the RV was used, then take a few minutes to go through and ensure that each appliance inside still works and give them a good clean while you’re at it.

All clean and ready to travel © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

9. Vacuum and Mop

With all of the surfaces and appliances clean, move onto the floors and give them a thorough vacuum along with the sofas if necessary. Once everything has been picked up, get the mop out and make the floors sparkle.

With an RV that has been aired out and cleaned top to bottom, you can rest knowing that everything is ready and waiting for the next adventure that lies just around the corner!

Now, hit the road already

10. All Systems Go!

Taking the time to run these checks and performing any necessary maintenance will go a long way towards making your camping season a success. Now all you need to do is pick a location and head out for an epic spring vacation.

Worth Pondering…

Spring has sprung. The grass is riz. Time for RVing and camping bliss!

Getting Your RV Ready for Summer Travel

It’s finally time to pull the RV out from the garage or bring it home from winter storage

With the snow melted and the campgrounds opening, it’s tempting to jump in and head off right away. But prior to setting out, RV owners need to perform some basic and routine maintenance to ensure that their weekend getaway goes smoothly.

RV exterior © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Exterior Inspection

The first thing to do is a visual inspection of your RV exterior. Check to see if any damage was sustained over winter, looking especially for evidence of water leaks. In particular, focus on the roof and caulking around windows, vents, air-conditioning unit, and doors. Look for cracks, holes, stains, separations, and leaks. Also, check for nests and evidence of chewing activity.

Roll out the awning and inspect it for tears. Check the fluid levels and top them up as necessary. Inspect hoses for any tears or holes, and valves for leaks.

Ensure your RV and tow vehicle/toad have had all required maintenance.

Wash the exterior in the shade with a mild soap remembering to clean the tires.

Not the way to care for tires © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Tire Check

Check the age of the tires—RV tires usually age out before they wear out.

Check that all tires are properly inflated. Improperly inflated tires means more money for fuel. Under-inflated tires can increase fuel consumption by up to 4 percent, according to International Energy Agency. Proper inflation also reduces the incidence of tire failure and blowouts.

Clean the tires and rims and inspect them for evidence of any splits or cracks in the sidewalls or between the treads. Treat these seriously and get them repaired before you head out for your first camping trip. Don’t forget to check that your lug nuts are tightened.

If you have a travel or fifth wheel trailer you may need to pack wheel bearings.

RV exterior © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Battery Check

Check your RVs batteries and top off cells with distilled water. Be sure to replace multiple battery banks together. If your batteries need to be cleaned, make sure they are disconnected and use a hot water and baking soda mixture to clean them. Wear safety glasses and latex gloves.

Connecting to city water © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Propane Tank Check

Check your propane tank, as seals can dry out over the winter. First, make sure you have everything turned off, you aren’t around any smoking flames or sparks, and your propane leak detector is turned on. Open the valves on your tank and smell for leaks. Check the valves and regulators by using a soapy water mix. If you find any leaks, have a professional inspect and repair them.

RV exterior © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Generator Test

Test your generator, if you have one. Use the prime feature until your indicator light turns on for the fuel pump, run it for 20 seconds, and the generator should start more quickly. You will have to crank it until it starts otherwise, as there will likely be a lack of fuel in the lines. Let the starter rest to cool after 15 seconds of cranking. Don’t forget to check the oil and air filter.

RV utilities © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Flushing Water Lines

Remove the antifreeze from your water lines. Make sure the water heater bypass valve is in the normal position and all of your taps are closed. Turn on the cold water tap that’s closest to the water pump, and run water until it’s clear. Do this for each cold water tap, toilet, and shower.

Then repeat for the hot water taps, toilet, and shower. Open up the bypass to allow water to fill the tanks. Use a city water connection and turn on the cold and hot water faucets and run to let air escape until the water flows steadily. Inspect all faucets and pipes for leaks, as well as the water heater, drain plug, and valves. Switch the fresh water pump on; if it comes on 20 to 30 minutes later, this indicates a pressure drop or leak. If it doesn’t come on, you’re good to go.

RV interior © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Interior Inspection

Clean the interior of the RV and do another visual inspection. Vacuum the carpet, and clean the floors and other surfaces as necessary. Be sure to air it out. Check to ensure your appliances are working.

Test smoke alarms and CO and LP gas detectors, and replace the batteries as necessary. Check fire extinguishers, and refill first aid kit and emergency kits as needed.

RV interior © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Finally, you can repack your RV and stock up on all your necessities.

Worth Pondering…

A bad day cleaning the RVing—is better than a good day—working.

March 2021 RV Manufacturer Recalls

A manufacturer recall can create a safety risk if not repaired

Your recreational vehicle may be involved in a safety recall and may create a safety risk for you or your passengers. Safety defects must be repaired by a certified dealer at no cost to you. However, if left unrepaired, a potential safety defect in your vehicle could lead to injury or even death.

What is a recall?

When a manufacturer or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) determines that a recreational vehicle or item of RV equipment creates an unreasonable risk to safety or fails to meet minimum safety standards, the manufacturer is required to fix that vehicle or equipment at no cost to the consumer.

NHTSA releases its most recent list of recalls each Monday.

It should be noted that RV recalls are related to vehicle safety and not product quality. NHTSA has no interest in an air conditioner failing to cool or slide out failing to extend or retract—unless they can be directly attributed to product safety.

NHTSA announced 12 recall notices during March 2021. These recalls involved 6 recreational vehicle manufacturers—Forest River (4 recalls), Newmar (3 recalls), Jayco (2 recalls), Keystone (1 recall), Highland Ridge (1 recall), and Airstream (1 recall).

Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2021 Catalina 184BHS and 184 BHS-W travel trailer recreational vehicles. The interior plates that clamp the slide-mechanism to the interior wall were installed incorrectly, which may cause the slide-room to partially detach during transit.

Forest River will notify owners, and dealers will reinstall the interior plates for the slide-room, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 9, 2021. Owners may contact Catalina customer service at 1-574-825-4995. Forest River’s number for this recall is 203-1300.

Pala Casino RV Resort, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2021 Cardinal CAF345RLX, CAF366DVLE, CAF390BX and 2021 Wildcat WCF336RLS, WCF368MB vehicles. The furnace flue may become misaligned due to insufficient furnace hold screws that allow movement during travel.

Forest River will notify owners, and dealers will secure the furnace and align the flue, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 14, 2021. Owners may contact Forest River customer service at 1-574-296-7700. Forest River’s number for this recall is 15-1302.

Whispering Hills RV Park, Georgetown, Kentucky © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2021 Cardinal and Wildcat Fifth Wheels trailers. The spare tire carrier may be installed incorrectly, allowing it to detach from the vehicle.

Forest River will notify owners, and dealers will secure the spare tire carrier, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 17, 2021. Owners may contact Forest River Customer Service at 1-574-296-7700. Forest River’s number for this recall is 15-1304.

Frog City RV Park, Duson, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2021 Coachmen Viking and Clipper Travel Trailers. The cooktop may not be isolated properly from the furnace return air, which can cause the flame to become inverted.

Forest River will notify owners, and dealers will install a panel and seal it, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 21, 2021. Owners may contact Forest River customer service at 1-269-467-4600. Forest River’s number for this recall is 121-1305.

Hacienda RV Resort, Las Cruces, New Mexico © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Newmar

Newmar Corporation (Newmar) is recalling certain 2021 Kountry Star and 2017-2021 Dutch Star motorhomes. The brake light switch may chafe against the windshield wiper mechanism, which could damage the brake light switch or it’s wiring, and cause the brake lights to not illuminate.

Newmar will notify owners, and dealers will inspect the brake light switch and replace it as necessary, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 18, 2021. Owners may contact Newmar customer service at 1-800-731-8300.

Columbia River RV Park, Portland, Oregon © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Newmar

Newmar Corporation (Newmar) is recalling certain 2020-2022 Dutch Star, King Aire, Essex, London Aire, and Mountain Aire motorhomes. The steering gear mounting bolts may become loose and back out, resulting in difficulty steering.

On behalf of Newmar, Shyft Group Inc. will coordinate the recall repair and notify owners, and dealers will replace the steering gear mounting bolts and washers, free of charge. The recall is expected to began April 19, 2021. Owners may contact Newmar customer service at 1-800-731-8300. Newmar’s number for this recall is 21V 041.

The Barnyard RV Park, Lexington, South Carolina © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Newmar

Newmar Corporation (Newmar) is recalling certain 2021 Dutch Star, New Aire, and Ventana motorhomes. The adjustable brake pedal assembly may be missing a return spring. This may cause the brake lights to stay illuminated after the brake pedal is released. Also, in certain towed vehicles, the brakes may stay engaged after the brake pedal is released.

Newmar will notify owners, and dealers will inspect the brake pedal assembly, and install a return spring if necessary, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin May 16, 2021. Owners may contact Newmar customer service at 1-800-731-8300. Newmar’s number for this recall is 21V 108.

Sun Outdoors Pigeon Forge, Sevierville, Tennessee © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Jayco

Jayco, Inc. (Jayco) is recalling certain 2021 Jayco Embark, and Entegra Reatta Class A Motorhomes. The LP furnace hose may be routed incorrectly, which could restrict the gas flow, or cause chafing against surrounding components, resulting in a gas leak.

Jayco will notify owners, and dealers will remove the existing LP line, and install a new extended gas manifold, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 16, 2021. Owners may contact Jayco customer service at 1-800-517-9137. Jayco’s number for this recall is 9903565.

Whispering Oaks RV Park, Weimer, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Jayco

Jayco, Inc. (Jayco) is recalling certain 2019-2020 Jayco White Hawk, Jay Flight SLX, Jay Feather, and Jay Flight travel trailers equipped with Dometic 3 burner cooking stoves. The saddle valve securing bolt may be overtightened, possibly damaging the o-ring seal and causing a continuous gas leak.

Jayco will notify owners, and Dometic service centers will install a remedy kit of gaskets, washers, thread locker bolts, and two round orange labels, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 30, 2021. Owners may contact Jayco customer service at 1-800-283-8267. Jayco’s number for this recall is 9901566.

Smokiam RV Park, Soap Lake, Washington © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Keystone

Keystone RV Company (Keystone) is recalling certain 2021 Cougar 29MBS, 30RLS, 315RLS, 316RLS, 32BHS, 353SRX, 364BHL, and 368MBI trailers equipped with the Off the Grid (OTG) Solar package. The inverter may have been incorrectly wired, causing power to energize the shore power connection, when in use.

Keystone will notify owners, and dealers will test the inverter function, and rewire it if necessary, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 11, 2021. Owners may contact Keystone customer service at 1-866-425-4369. Keystone’s number for this recall is 21-403.

Rapid City RV Park, Rapid City, South Dakota © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Highland Ridge

Highland Ridge RV (Highland Ridge) is recalling certain 2019-2020 Open Range, Mesa Ridge, Highlander, Silverstar fifth wheels, and 2019-2020 Open Range, Mesa Ridge and Silverstar travel trailers equipped with Dometic 3 burner cooking stoves. The saddle valve securing bolt may be overtightened, possibly damaging the O-ring seal and causing a continuous gas leak.

Highland Ridge will notify owners, and dealers will install a remedy kit of gaskets, washers, thread locker bolts, and two round orange labels, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 16, 2021. Owners may contact Highland Ridge customer service at 1-800-283-8267. Highland Ridge’s number for this recall is 9904564.

Edisto Island State Park, South Carolina © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Airstream

Airstream, Inc. (Airstream) is recalling certain 2017-2020 Basecamp travel trailers. The mounting bolts that secure the air conditioner to the roof may loosen or break, allowing the air conditioner to separate from the trailer.

The remedy is currently under development. The recall is expected to begin May 18, 2021. Owners may contact Airstream customer service at 1-877-596-6505 or 1-937-596-6111 ext. 7401 or 7411.

Please Note: This is the 26th in a series of posts relating to RV Manufacturers Recalls

Worth Pondering…

It is easier to do a job right than to explain why you didn’t.

—Martin Van Buren

February 2021 RV Manufacturer Recalls

A manufacturer recall can create a safety risk if not repaired

Your recreational vehicle may be involved in a safety recall and may create a safety risk for you or your passengers. Safety defects must be repaired by a certified dealer at no cost to you. However, if left unrepaired, a potential safety defect in your vehicle could lead to injury or even death.

Sunrise RV Park, Texarkana, Arkansas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is a recall?

When a manufacturer or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) determines that a recreational vehicle or item of RV equipment creates an unreasonable risk to safety or fails to meet minimum safety standards, the manufacturer is required to fix that vehicle or equipment at no cost to the consumer.

NHTSA releases its most recent list of recalls each Monday.

It should be noted that RV recalls are related to vehicle safety and not product quality. NHTSA has no interest in an air conditioner failing to cool or slide out failing to extend or retract—unless they can be directly attributed to product safety.

NHTSA announced 10 recall notices during February 2021. These recalls involved 7 recreational vehicle manufacturers—Keystone (4 recalls), Forest River (1 recall), Jayco (1 recall), Freightliner Custom Chassis (1 recall), Bigfoot (1 recall), MCI (1 recall), and Newmar (1 recall).

Blake Ranch RV Park, Kingman, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Keystone

Keystone RV Company (Keystone) is recalling certain 2021 Crossroads Redwood 3401RL, 3901MB, 3901WB, 3911RL, 3951MB, 3951WB, 3981FK, 3991RD, 4001LK, 4150RD recreational trailers, built on D80 Dexter Axles. The U-bolts on these axles may have been improperly torqued, causing the bolts to loosen and the axle to slide.

Keystone will notify owners, and dealers will properly tighten the U-bolts, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin February 26, 2021. Owners may contact Keystone customer service at 1-866-425-4369. Keystone’s number for this recall is 21-394.

Pala Casino RV Park, Pala, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Keystone

Keystone RV Company (Keystone) is recalling certain 2019-2020 Impact 26V, 28V, 29V, 311, 317, 330, 332, 343, 351, 359, 367, 415, 3118, 3219 recreational trailers, equipped with Dometic 3 burner cooking stoves. The internal O-ring between the saddle valve and the manifold can experience a propane gas leak.

Keystone will notify owners, and dealers will remove the existing manifold bolts and seals and install new seals and bolts, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin March 5, 2021. Owners may contact Keystone customer service at 1-866-425-4369. Keystone’s number for this recall is 21-398.

Harvest Moon RV Park, Adairsville, Georgia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Keystone

Keystone RV Company (Keystone) is recalling certain 2020-2021 Dutchmen Voltage 3001, 3351, 3521, 3531, 3551, 3571, 3951 and 4271 recreational trailers. The Federal Identification Tag incorrectly lists the recommended tire pressure as 110 PSI, instead of the correct tire pressure of 95 PSI. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of 49 CFR Part 567, “Certification.”

Keystone will notify owners, and dealers will replace the Federal Identification Tag, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin February 18, 2021. Owners may contact Keystone customer service at 1-866-425-4369. Keystone’s number for this recall is 21-399.

Oh! Kentucky Campground and RV Park, Berea, Kentucky © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Keystone

Keystone RV Company (Keystone) is recalling certain 2021 Dutchmen Voltage 3915 and 4225 recreational trailers. The Federal Identification Tag incorrectly lists the recommended tire pressure as 95 PSI, instead of the correct tire pressure of 110 PSI. As such, these vehicles fail to comply with the requirements of 49 CFR Part 567, “Certification.”

Keystone will notify owners, and dealers will replace the Federal Identification Tag, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin February 18, 2021. Owners may contact Keystone customer service at 1-866-425-4369. Keystone’s number for this recall is 21-400.

Lakeside RV Park, Livingston, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Forest River

Forest River, Inc. (Forest River) is recalling certain 2021 Wildcat Travel Trailer models WCT247RXX-OR and WCT276FKX-OR. The safety chains do not meet the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) and could potentially break.

Forest River will notify owners, and dealers will replace the safety chains with correctly rated safety chains, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin March 19, 2021. Owners may contact Forest River customer service at 1-503-831-5410.
Forest River’s number for this recall is 22-1189.

Sunny Acres RV Park, Las Cruces, New Mexico © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Jayco

Jayco, Inc. (Jayco) is recalling certain 2021 Jayco Eagle fifth wheel vehicles. Certain vehicles were equipped with a 4 1/4 inch spring hanger instead of the proper 5 1/4 inch spring hanger, reducing the tire clearance.

Jayco will notify owners, and dealers will install the correct 5 1/4 spring hangers, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin March 15, 2021. Owners may contact Jayco customer service at 1-617-776-0344. Jayco’s number for this recall is 9901563.

Seven Feathers Casino RV Resort, Canyonville, Oregon © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Freightliner Custom Chassis

Daimler Trucks North America, LLC (DTNA) is recalling 2021 Western Star 4700 and 5700, Freightliner Business Class M2, Cascadia, and Custom Chassis XC Chassis vehicles manufactured with a certain steering arm configuration with air disc brakes identified by the axle assembly supplier. On certain vehicles, one of the six brake caliper mounting bolts on the driver side steer axle may have been incorrectly tightened.

DTNA will notify owners, and dealers will inspect and repair as necessary, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin March 19, 2021. Owners may contact DTNA customer service at 1-800-547-0712. DTNA’s number for this recall is FL-873.

Ivy Acres RV Park, Greenville, South Carolina © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Bigfoot

Bigfoot Industries, Inc. (Bigfoot) is recalling certain 2020-2021 25b25FB, 25B25RQ, 25B21FB, and 25B21RB recreational vehicles, equipped with Dometic 3 burner cooking stoves. The saddle valve securing bolt may be overtightened, possibly damaging the o-ring seal and causing a continuous gas leak.

Bigfoot will notify owners, and Dometic dealers will install a remedy kit of gaskets, washers, thread locker bolts, and two round orange labels, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin February 22, 2021. Owners may contact Bigfoot customer service at 1-250-546-2155.

Two Rivers Landing RV Resort, Sevierville, Tennessee © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

MCI

Motor Coach Industries (MCI) is recalling certain 2018-2021 J4500 and 2018-2020 D45CRTLE vehicles. The power cables may have been improperly installed and routed in the vehicle battery compartment, which may result in chafing.

MCI will notify owners, and dealers will inspect and if necessary, correct the clearance for the power cables in the battery compartment, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin March 10, 2021. Owners may contact MCI customer service at 1-800-241-2947. MCI’s number for this recall is R21-003.

Katy Lake RV Resort, Katy, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Newmar

Newmar Corporation (Newmar) is recalling certain 2021 Kountry Star and Ventana motorhomes. One of the six brake caliper mounting bolts on the driver side steer axle may have been incorrectly tightened.

On behalf of Newmar, DTNA will coordinate the recall repair and notify owners, and dealers will inspect and repair as necessary, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 13, 2021. Owners may contact Newmar customer service at 1-800-731-8300. Newmar’s number for this recall is 21V-018.

Please Note: This is the 25th in a series of posts relating to RV Manufacturers Recalls

Worth Pondering…

It is easier to do a job right than to explain why you didn’t.

—Martin Van Buren