10 Reasons Why the Super C Motorhome Is the King of RVs

Super C motorhomes have numerous benefits for travelers with specific needs. Let’s take a closer look at 10 of the reasons for owning one.

What’s so super about a Super C motorhome? Lots of things and I’ll go down the list one by one. Are they sturdy, powerful, and comfortable? Check, check, and check. In fact, they might just be the most versatile style of RVs.

With just a quick look up and down the highway or around the RV parks, you’ll see they’re growing in popularity. I’ll show why they’ve earned the crown as the king (or queen!) of all RVs.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is a Super C motorhome?

As the name implies, a Super C motorhome is a bigger, more rugged version of a Class C motorhome. They can be quite luxurious, too!

A Super C is a souped-up version of a traditional Class C motorhome.

Like the Class C, a Super C motorhome has a distinctive cab-over area in the front that’s usually a sleeping area. And that’s along with a bedroom in the back plus a kitchen, bathroom, separate shower, dinette, and living area. What’s different is the Super C is built on a heavy-duty truck chassis rather than a van chassis so it’s sturdier and can carry heavier loads. 

This opens up possibilities for better-quality furnishings and accessories—and more of them. The Super C has more storage space and more power under the hood. A Super C motorhome is big—typically ranging from around 33 feet to about 45 feet. It’s safe to say that many RV parks can accommodate them, even with a vehicle in tow.

➡ You might consider a Super C a big rig but some RV parks and campgrounds have a different opinion. Before you book a stay, find out What Does Big Rig Friendly Really Mean?

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

10 reasons why Super C motorhomes are RV royalty

I’ve already checked quite a few boxes in favor of the Super C motorhome. I’ll expound on those a bit and add a few more to explain why they reign supreme.

1. They have a powerful engine and driveline

A Super C has its engine in the front and it’s usually a diesel (but not always). The engines pack a lot of power, too. These are large displacement engines with lots of horsepower and torque to carry heavy loads and tackle challenging terrain.

Many times Super C motorhomes have a more robust drive than even the biggest class A motorhomes. Like a semi, many of them have two sets of dual rear wheels and sometimes both are powered giving them far more carrying capacity and traction.

2. Safer in a crash

A Super C’s heavy-duty truck chassis will hold up better in a collision. With the engine in front (unlike a diesel pusher) you have more of a protective barrier in a head-on crash. And with a wider wheelbase they’re less likely to overturn.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

3. They drive like trucks

Super C motorhomes may have more muscle than what you’re used to but it’s probably within your comfort zone. Getting behind the wheel of a Super C is more or less like driving a big pickup truck with a truck camper on the back.

By comparison, there’s a bigger learning curve with the larger, lumbering Class A motorhomes. Driving a Class A is more like driving a bus because you’re positioned on top of the front wheels rather than behind them.

4. Straightforward maintenance

Those truck engines are easy to work on and most mechanics have experience with them. You won’t have to hunt down a specialist when you need to do some repairs. And it may be a while before you do. Heavy-duty truck engines are designed to go for hundreds of thousands of miles with routine maintenance.

5. Ride in comfort

When in transit, the extra weight and width of the Super C motorhome’s heavy-duty chassis give you tons of stability. Combine that with air suspension and you’ve got an exceptionally smooth ride. This is true on open highways as well as bumpy country roads.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

6. Quality interiors

Because Super Cs can carry heavier loads, manufacturers don’t have to compromise by using lightweight materials. Many of these motorhomes have upgraded components and features like solid wood cabinetry, granite countertops, tile flooring, and electric fireplaces.

7. Spacious floorplans 

Those wider wheelbases are often a bit longer, too. A few extra inches here and there can add up to much more living space, even king-sized beds. In addition, some Super C motorhomes have multiple slide-outs so you can stretch out even more.

8. Significant towing capacity

With a Super C, you’ll be able to bring along a second vehicle to use as a daily driver. Or, you may want to tow your boat or other toys you can’t leave behind. Towing capacities of 10,000 pounds to 20,000 pounds are more typical but some models can tow up to 25,000 pounds.

9. Large holding tanks

Bigger tanks mean you can stay in one place longer even off the grid. It’s not unusual for a Super C to have a fresh water capacity of 100 to 150 gallons. Count on 75 gallons or so for black and grey tanks.

10. Increased storage (and cargo carrying capacity)

While Class C motorhomes are notorious for their limited storage space, their super-sized cousins have more room to spare. The roomy basement area is more like what you’d expect to find on a Class A motorhome. You’ll still need to pack wisely but you can definitely carry more things with you.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Do you need a special driver’s license to drive a Super C?

In most places, you don’t need any kind of special driver’s license to drive a motorhome if you’re doing it for recreational purposes. However, if it’s for business, you should have a Commercial Driver’s License (CDL).

These laws vary from state to state and province to province but most of them don’t have any particular restrictions on RVs that weigh less than 26,000 pounds. Most Super C motorhomes weigh more than that and you might need a special license so check your state or provincial laws.

How much does a Super C motorhome cost?

You can expect to pay $500,000 or more for a brand-new Super C off the lot. And when we say or more, it could be considerably more. The price could rise as high as $775,000 depending on the manufacturer and what kinds of extras it has. On the other hand, you may be able to buy a used one for $150,000 to $200,000.

While we’re talking numbers, you should also consider fuel costs. Unfortunately, many Super C motorhomes get less than 10 mpg.

Pro tip: Some motorhome buyers forget to factor in the cost of the RV lifestyle.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Are you considering a Super C motorhome?

As you can see, the Super C motorhome has a lot going for it. They’re spacious, easy to drive, and have high-end features. In fact, you might even feel like you’re riding on a cushion of air thanks to the suspension. 

Super C motorhomes are also powerful, safe, and dependable. And if you have a maintenance issue, they’re usually not difficult to repair.

It’s no wonder we see so many running the roads and settling in for long stays. They may not be the ideal rig for everyone but there are many Super C owners who wouldn’t want any other kind of RV.

Worth Pondering…

No matter where we go in our motorhome, that sense of independence is satisfying. We have our own facilities, from comfortable bed to a fridge full of our favorite foods. We set the thermostat the way we like it and go to bed and get up in our usual routine.

What Does Big Rig Friendly Really Mean?

Big rig friendly refers to RV parks that have sites that can accommodate RVs in the 40-45 foot range that are towing for a 55-65 foot overall length and have a way for you to get through the campground to one of those sites

Ever since we purchased our first Class A motorhome, this phrase has become much more important to our everyday travel experience. But what exactly does big rig friendly mean when it comes to RVs? How big is a big rig considered and how truthful are these claims?

Today, let’s delve into the essential aspects of this concept and explore how it impacts RV travel, campsite choices, and the overall enjoyment of life on the open road.

Vista del Sol, a big-rig friendly RV resort at Bullhead City, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is considered a big rig? 

You’ll often hear the term big rig in reference to semi-trucks or other large commercial vehicles. However, you may see this designation on RV park and campground websites too. 

In the RV world, a big rig is a nickname for any RV over 40 feet. It’s not just a designation for motorized RVs either. A fifth wheel over 40 feet is just as much a big rig as a Class A motorhome. The largest travel trailers can also be over 40 feet long.

By the way, I have a post on What Is A Big Rig RV?

The Springs at Borrego, a big-rig friendly RV resort at Borrego Springs, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What does big rig friendly really mean?

RV parks will use the words big-rig friendly as part of their promotion to get RVers to stay at their location. However, this term can mean different things to different campgrounds as there is no standardized qualification.

What big rig friendly ideally means for big-rig owners:

  • No low-hanging branches or signs
  • Widely spaced trees away from roads and campsites
  • No tight turns
  • Wider roads
  • Plenty of big campsites that fit RVs 40 feet+
  • Plenty of pull-through campsites
  • 50 amp electricity hookup available at most/all campsites

Unfortunately, if you don’t do thorough research, you might have to scrape a few branches and squeeze by a few trees to reach your big rig campsite or get stuck pulling down a dirt road to a campground that has its paved aisles. You need to be able to maneuver a big rig into and around a campground and park comfortably.

That’s why you want to read 25 Questions to Ask When Booking a Campsite.

Pro tip: Before you hit the road in a big rig, make sure you know your RV’s height!

Fuel station awnings vary in height. Do your research ahead of time to make sure your rig will fit.

River Sands, a big-rig friendly RV resort in Ehrenburg, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Does big rig friendly always mean a pull through campsite? 

Definitely not! Pull-through campsites can actually be shorter in length. Ask an RVer who’s towing or driving a big rig if they would rather have a pull-through site that’s 35 feet long or a 50-foot back-in site. 

Many will want the longer site regardless of whether or not you can pull through. So if you see pull-through sites available on a campground website, make sure to do your research to find out exactly how much space it has. Make sure you add in the length of your towing vehicle or towed car behind a motorhome.

But generally speaking, pull-through sites are more big rig friendly than back-ins especially if it means you don’t have to detach your toad or tow vehicle.

You don’t want the nose or tail end of your RV sticking out of your site. When you drive a big rig, the longer the site, the better!

Settlers Point, a big-rig friendly RV resort in Washington, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Should you trust a big rig friendly designation? 

The best thing to do if you have a long RV is to do your research. Don’t rely on the big rig-friendly label on a website. But if it’s an RV park call and ask about the length of the campsite. Don’t forget to also ask about the overheight clearance so you don’t damage your roof. 

Keep in mind other places such as gas stations and rest areas also claim the big rig-friendly title so when you decide to pull over for a stop, make sure you’ve done your research to find out if it can accommodate your RV. 

Use Google Earth to scope out the area. Call the attendant to ask about space. You don’t want to get stuck in a parking lot because you can’t turn around. If it’s a first-come, first-served campground, you can still browse the area to see what the sites and roads look like.

It’s also a good idea to find the best route to the entrance. This is when a phone call to the campground office comes in handy. Ask about construction, tunnels, bridges, closed roads, or anything else that makes maneuvering a big rig difficult. 

If possible, ask other people and read reviews. You can’t always trust some sites so check out reputable ones like Campendium or AllStays instead of Yelp.

Pro tip: RV-specific trip-planing services can help you navigate safely in a big rig.

RVers tend to be honest about their campground experiences, so reading reviews beforehand is always a good idea.

Texas Lakeside, a big-rig friendly RV resort in Port Lavaca, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

How do you find big rig friendly RV parks? 

Apps like RV Trip Wizard, Campendium, or AllStays are great resources for finding RV parks and most usually have information about maximum size and reviews from others. You’re also more likely to find big sites at parks with RV resorts in the name as they generally cater to this RV demographic.

Don’t give up hope of visiting those places if you have a larger RV. And again, talk to other campers. Find out where they’ve stayed that met the space needs of big rigs.

Ambassador, a big-rig friendly RV resort in Caldwell, Idaho © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Are national parks big rig friendly

Most national parks can’t accommodate big rigs—not only because the campsites sometimes aren’t big enough but because the roads leading to them are not fit for larger vehicles. Many National Park campgrounds were built during the New Deal era by the Civilian Corps. Back then, RVs were nowhere near the size they are today! Also, trees have grown and national parks typically don’t like clearing protected park areas for more development.

However, the recreation.gov website can help you quickly search for campsite size at almost any National Park site. For starters, Badlands National Park is one of the most big rig-friendly parks. Big Bend and Death Valley National Parks also have plenty of space.

Because national parks are generally not big-rig friendly, you might need a backup plan such as a toad vehicle to visit them.

Wind Creek Casino, a big-rig friendly RV resort in Atwood, Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

A big rig might require extra planning but they’re worth it

Finding a campsite in a national or state park can take time and cause a lot of frustration. Sometimes you have to wait for the perfect time or a cancellation to grab that one spot for a 45-foot Class A motorhome. 

If you don’t want to travel to the national parks, you’ll have many more options. Research to make sure everywhere you go—RV parks, rest stops, parking lots, fuel stops—really are big rig-friendly. Don’t just trust a sign or website caption. 

Pro tip: Whether you travel full-time or part-time, RVing requires planning. To stay at a national park, you’ll need to plan about six months in advance.

Worth Pondering…

No matter where we go in our motorhome, that sense of independence is satisfying. We have our own facilities, from comfortable bed to a fridge full of our favorite foods. We set the thermostat the way we like it and go to bed and get up in our usual routine.

What Is A Big Rig RV?

In the world of RV enthusiasts, the term big rig friendly carries significant weight. It’s more than just a catchphrase; it’s a fundamental consideration that can make or break a road trip experience.

We’ve all heard the term big rig tossed around from time to time and those of us in the RV community have often heard the term big rig RV and we’ve seen RV parks and campgrounds described as having big rig access or being big rig friendly.

But what exactly constitutes a big rig RV? And what does big rig access really mean?

I’ll answer these questions and a whole lot more in today’s post all about big rig RVs. Let’s go!

Big rig © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is a big rig RV?

Essentially, a big rig RV is classified as any RV over 40 feet long. Regardless of the type of RV (motorhome, fifth wheels, travel trailers) if your rig is over 40 feet long, you’ve got yourself a Big Rig.

If you have a big rig RV, you have lots of living space and you’ve also got to consider a few things owners of smaller rigs don’t have to think about like navigating city streets, your turning radius, and merging in traffic, among other issues.

You also need to carefully consider the size of your campsite and how to move in and out of it. This is why owners of large RVs search for campsites with big rig access. (You may also see the term big rig friendly used to describe campsites.)

Read more: 25 Questions to Ask When Booking a Campsite

Big rig © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What does big rig access mean?

Big rig access is a term used to describe the approach to a campsite that large RVs should be able to access. While a campsite may be big rig friendly and thus wide enough and long enough to accommodate your RV, if the approach to the campsite requires maneuvering through tight, narrow twists and turns around trees and large rocks, under low hanging branches, requiring masterful three-point turns to back into a site, then you’re not going to get your big rig RV into that campsite without risking damage to your rig.

So big rig access is supposed to mean that you’ll be able to approach the campsite and pull in or back in as needed, safely.

But hear me out…

Just because a campsite or RV park advertises a site or sites as having big rig access there are a couple of extra steps it makes sense to take every single time you plan your camping trip.

1. Always read reviews from other owners of large RVs who have accessed the campsite to get a sense of the reality of the situation. Again, a campground owner or marketer can measure a site and determine that adding the phrase big rig access is sensible because the site will accommodate a 43-foot diesel pusher. But if it’s tough to maneuver the rig to the campsite without risking damage to a large RV, you may not want to be there.

2. Walk to the site before driving to the site. When we arrive at a campsite, we’ll pull the rig over and walk the route we’ll have to drive to get our big rig into the site. We walk the route before we drive it (or scope it out from our easy-to-maneuver toad car). This is the best way to prevent yourself from getting into a situation that could not only damage your rig but could also be difficult to get out of once you’re in there.

Big rig © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is the biggest RV size?

Generally speaking, Class A motorhomes are the largest RVs on the road though there are also very large Super C motorhomes and fifth wheels that top out between 40 and 45 feet that are most definitely big rigs!

But there are also some extremely large, custom-made big rigs out there as well.

Rumor has it that Will Smith is the proud owner of a big rig RV with 1,200 square feet of living space. That’s a pretty big rig! For reference, the rig has 14 televisions (including a 100-inch roll-down movie screen in a 30-person screening room), is two stories tall, 55 feet long, has 22 wheels, and is essentially a yacht on wheels.

But Will Smith’s 55-foot land yacht, behemoth though it is, appears small in terms of length (and only length) next to the Powerhouse Ultra Line Coach, a rig that stretches to 122 feet long with its two separate RV cabins (one towing the other).

Again, these rigs are custom-made.

But the longest Class A motorhomes on the market are 45 feet long. Manufacturers such as Newmar and Entegra make several 45-foot models. Other big forty-five-footers include bus conversions often built on Prevost chassis.

Big rig © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is the biggest RV you can rent?

Why, it’s Will Smith’s rig, of course! You can rent Will’s big rig RV for a mere $9,000 a week. But, seriously, just about any length RV is available for rent via the many peer-to-peer rental platforms like RVnGo, RVshare, Outdoorsy, and RVezy. From big rig to small, they pretty much offer them all (sorry, didn’t mean to rhyme… it just happened).

Big rig © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Are big rig RVs considered Class A RVs?

Some custom-made RVs that are pulled by tractor-trailers are in a class all their own. But in terms of traditional RV types and classes, a typical big rig RV is most often a Class A Diesel Pusher (though, as mentioned above, there are 40+ foot fifth wheels and Super C motorhomes that also earn the title).

But, while a big rig RVs could be a Class A motorhome not all Class A motorhomes are big rigs! (There are some Class A RVs that are barely over 24 feet long.

Worth Pondering…

No matter where we go in our motorhome, that sense of independence is satisfying. We have our own facilities, from comfortable bed to a fridge full of our favorite foods. We set the thermostat the way we like it and go to bed and get up in our usual routine.