Most Scenic Campgrounds from Coast to Coast

There are tens of thousands of campsites across America, though not all offer breathtaking scenery. Many aren’t much more than a little dusty patch of earth. Some, however, offer campers spectacular vistas like these scenic campgrounds.

From Atlantic to Pacific, the US abounds with breathtaking scenery—and what better way to explore America’s beauty than an RV camping trip?

Sage Creek Campground at Badlands National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

While many parks have distinct, built-up camping grounds to choose from with running water and electricity for RV parking (great for road trips), more experienced outdoors people can also find plenty of locations for backcountry camping where they can really rough it. Sleeping under the stars renews the spirit, and pitching a tent is a budget-friendly alternative to expensive.

Devils Garden Campground at Arches National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Take a look at some of the amazing campsites, and don’t forget to bring your sense of adventure—and your camera.

Sage Creek Campground at Badlands National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Sage Creek Campground at Badlands National Park in South Dakota

Don’t underestimate the beauty of the Badlands. Between the many rock formations you’ll see there, you’ll also find prairies and places to peak at ancient fossils. There are two choices of campgrounds: Cedar Pass (with amenities like running water and electricity) and Sage Creek (with no running water but you can often see bison wandering around).

Sage Creek Campground at Badlands National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

A stay at this primitive campground offers an authentic experience of the vast Badlands. Visitors can observe bison roaming the park’s prairie landscape, which abounds with colorful buttes formed from layers of sediment.

Devils Garden Campground at Arches National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Devils Garden Campground at Arches National Park in Utah

Arches only has one campground, The Devils Garden, which has 50 campsites, but there are numerous other places to camp nearby in the Moab area.

Devils Garden Campground at Arches National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

At Devils Garden Campground, visitors spend the night among the natural sandstone formations of Arches National Park. During the day, they can hike through the desert landscape, admiring the flowering cacti and juniper trees.

One of the most popular trails, the Delicate Arch Trail, takes you on an amazing hike full of photo opportunities.

Hunting Island State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Campground at Hunting Island State Park in South Carolina

Hunting Island is South Carolina’s single most popular state park, attracting more than a million visitors a year, as well as a vast array of land and marine wildlife. Five miles of pristine beaches, thousands of acres of marsh and maritime forest, a saltwater lagoon and ocean inlet, and a 100-site campground are all part of the park’s natural allure.

Each camping site offers water and 20/30/50-amp electric service. Some sites accommodate RVs up to 40 feet; other up to 28 feet.

Edisto Beach State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Campground at Edisto Beach State Park in South Carolina

Edisto Beach on Edisto Island is one of four oceanfront state parks in South Carolina. Edisto Beach State Park features trails for hiking and biking that provide a wonderful tour of the park. The park’s environmental education center is a “green” building with exhibits that highlight the natural history of Edisto Island and the surrounding ACE Basin.

Edisto Beach State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Camping with water and electrical hookups is available ocean-side or near the salt marsh. Several sites accommodate RVs up to 40 feet. Each campground is convenient to restrooms with hot showers.

Gulf State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Campground at Gulf State Park in Alabama

Gulf State Park’s two miles of beaches greet you with plenty of white sun-kissed sand, surging surf, seagulls, and sea shells, but there is more than sand and surf to sink your toes into. 

Gulf State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Located 1.5 miles from the white sand beaches, Gulf State Park Campground offers 496 improved full-hookup campsites with paved pads and with 11 primitive sites. Tents are welcome on all sites. 

Laura S. Walker State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Campground at Laura S. Walker State Park in Georgia

Located near the northern edge of the mysterious Okefenokee Swamp, this park is home to many fascinating creatures and plants, including alligators and carnivorous pitcher plants. Walking or biking along the lake’s edge and nature trail, visitors may spot the shy gopher tortoise, numerous oak varieties, saw palmettos, yellow shafted flickers, warblers, owls and great blue herons. The park’s lake offers opportunities for fishing, swimming and boating

Laura S. Walker State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The park has 64 camping sites; 44 sites offer electric utilities and accommodate RVs up to 40 feet.

Worth Pondering…

Stuff your eyes with wonder…live as if you’d drop dead in ten seconds. See the world. It’s more fantastic than any dream made or paid for in factories.

—Ray Bradbury

The Perfect Campsite: 10 Questions to Ask

The key to enjoying campground bliss lies in knowing the exact type of site you want, and then making the effort to reserve that spot

Most everyone in the campground industry wants you to book your campsite online. And many of you do just that.

But RVing with Rex has one thing to say about this trend: Don’t do it. Seriously. Just don’t do it. Pick up the phone. Yes, and talk to a real person.

Back-in site at Jack’s Landing RV Park, Grants Pass, Oregon © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

All campgrounds are not created equal, and you should never blindly book an RV park without doing the research—not knowing if it has the space, amenities, the views, and the location that you prefer.

You might have to work a little harder and actually talk to someone on the phone (GASP!), but when you are sitting with a view of the creek, you’ll know it was worth it.

Pull-through site at Toutle River RV Resort near Mt. St. Helens, Washington © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

Many research junkies just put in their travel dates and leave the actual campsite selection to an impersonal computer algorithm.

But, not us. We have stayed at hundreds of RV parks and campgrounds around the country and can say one thing for certain: even the best 5-star campgrounds and RV parks have some mediocre (or just plain bad) sites. Even more importantly, there is no one-size-fits-all ideal. The best campsite for a family with small children might be senior’s worst nightmare.

Back-in site at Canyon Vista RV Resort, Gold Canyon, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

The key to enjoying campground bliss lies in knowing the exact type of site you want, and then making the effort to reserve that spot. Here are ten questions to ask before booking your next great RV adventure.

Pull-in site at Holiday Hills RV Park, Penticton, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

Can I talk to someone who knows the campground layout?

Talk to a member of the staff who knows the campground well. These days, many want to take the easy way out and book online, but that won’t guarantee you a slice of camping heaven. Open up the campground map on your laptop, and settle in for a chat.

This site offers 50/30/20-amp electric service, water, sewer, and cable TV © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

What hookups do I want?

Campgrounds usually offer a range of hookup options. Some sites will have full hookups, with 30 or 50-amp electric service; other sites will offer just water and electric. If the campground is rustic, there may be no hookups available at all.

Pull-through site at Ambassador RV Resort, Caldwell, Idaho © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

Do I want a pull through or back in?

People with larger rigs or limited experience often prefer pull through campsites since they are easier to navigate. However, these sites can also be less private, less aesthetically pleasing, and more costly. A back in site might be trickier to get into, but it could also offer you the scenery and space you prefer.

Clubhouse at Lakeside RV Resort, Port Lavaca, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

Do I want to be close to the action, or far away?

Many RV parks have hubs of activity where playgrounds, pools, and shuffleboard courts are located. Study the campground map to determine your preferred location

Pull-through full-service sites near the water at Gulf State Park, Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

Do I want to be close to the bathhouses or far away?

If you plan to use the facilities in your RV, then there’s no reason to be located near the bathhouses where you might find increased traffic and noise.

Back-in sites at River Run RV Resort, Bakersfield, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

Can I hear road noise from this site?

RVers who travel in motorhomes and run the air conditioning at night may not care that their campsite is backed up to a highway. But pop up campers and hybrid travel trailers won’t block out that road noise at night. Light sleepers should make this issue a priority when choosing a campsite. Also, be on the lookout for any railroad tracks that run by the campground.

Traffic is not an issue at The Lakes at Chowchilla (California) due to the layout of the park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

Will a lot of campground traffic pass this site?

Traffic flow through a campground will affect your camping experience. If you are near the entrance, consider that every single vehicle entering and exiting will likely pass by your site. Garbage disposal bins are another source of high traffic.

It’s all sun at Vista del Sol RV Resort, Bullhead City, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

Do I want shade or sun?

Are you looking for lots of trees where you can hang a hammock and nap under rustling leaves? Or do you dream of sitting in the sun with a glass of iced tea and a good book?

Waterfront site at Lake Pleasant, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

Do I want a waterfront site?

There is a reason why so many campgrounds are located on lakes, rivers, and streams. Sitting at your campsite and listening to the sound of rushing water may just be the most relaxing experience. But these sites are usually the most popular and fill up quickly. If you want to prime waterfront site, you need to book far in advance.

Waltons Lakefront RV Resort, Osoyoos, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

Do I want a buddy site?

If you are traveling with family or friends, then look for a buddy site. These campsites are set up so that your RVs can be parked awning to awning, with camper doors facing each other. This creates a wonderful shared space in the middle where you can comfortably gather with friends.

Long pull-through site at On-Ur-Way RV Park, Onoway, Iowa © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

There is no such thing as the perfect campsite. Some RVers want rustic and private spots, while others seek out immaculate landscaping and access to amenities. The trick to finding your perfect site is knowing exactly what you want and doing some research to make it happen.

Lakeside sites at Poche’s RV Park, Breaux Bridge, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

Worth Pondering…

Quality is never an accident; it is always the result of intelligent effort.

—John Ruskin

You Might Be an RVer If…

You might be a RVer If…a toad is not an amphibian

You might be a RVer if going out for drinks means sitting under the awning with a beer or glass of wine.

You might be a RVer if roughing it is only water and electric.

2019 Newmar Dutch Star at 12 Tribes Casino RV Park, Omak, Washington © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

For any of the more than 10 million Americans and Canadians who will go RVing this year, one question they will ask is what exactly makes them an RVer?

Loredo fifth wheel trailer by Keystone at Ambassador RV Resort, Caldwell, Idaho © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

The RV and Motorhome Hall of Fame and Museum is now selling the answer in the form of the ultimate RV Joke Book—You Might Be A RVer If… RV Joke Book by Mark and Katarina Koep.

The title is a humorous look at the RV lifestyle and covers topics like shopping, packing, and driving a RV.

Fifth wheel trailers at Gila Bend KOA, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

“The RV industry is absolutely booming but there are no books outside of travel guides directed at this audience,” stated Mark Koep, co-author with his GPS and wife Katarina Koep.

“We know they, RVers, read and we know they laugh so why not give them something that accomplishes both tasks?”

Fifth wheel trailer at Rio Bend Golf and RV Resort, El Centro, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

Just like the back half of the Walmart parking lot, this book is made just for RVers. A collection of some of the funniest RV jokes ever put into print, readers will now have an even better excuse to spend more time on the commode.

Fifth wheel trailer at Jekyll Island Campground, Georgia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

For example, you might be a RVer If:

Your RV cost more than your first house…and by the time the Fed is done your current house, too

You stay away from RV shows after the last incident of “only looking”

RVs at Whispering Pines RV Park near Georgetown, Kentucky © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

You think the capitol of the United States is Elkhart, Indiana (home of the RV industry)

You have disowned any friends or family that doesn’t have full hookup access for your visits

Camping at Lakeside RV Park near Baton Rouge, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

You have paid to have hookups installed because you really don’t want to disown them

They refused to allow you to pour a concrete parking lane across the grass so you changed your mind and disowned them anyways

Class A motorhome at Columbia River RV Resort, Woodland, Washington © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

The 148-page paperback book is available for sale in the RV and Motorhome Hall of Fame and Museum store with a retail price of $12.99.

“We are always on the lookout for unique items that speak to our visitors and share the joy and fun of RVing,” said Connie Hart, museum coordinator.

“This book is a perfect fit and we invite anyone passing through Elkhart to stop and learn more about the Museum and RV industry, and pick up their copy of the book.”

2012 Newmar Dutch Star Class A motorhome at Capital City RV Park, Montgomery, Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

You Might Be a RVer If… RV Joke Book: Written by RVers for RVers is also available in paperback or digital download from BookPatch.com and Amazon.com.

You might be a RVer if…you can drive better in reverse than most people drive forward.

2019 Newmar Dutch Star interior © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

You might be a RVer if…after buying a new bigger truck you decide that now you can buy a new bigger trailer…and the cycle keeps repeating.

You might be a RVer if…you buy things you will never need simply because they are collapsible.

All hooked up at full-service RV park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

You might be a RVer If…a toad is not an amphibian.

You might be a RVer if…you know what a “dump” really is.

2019 Newmar Dutch Star at La Quintas RV Park, Yuma, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserve

You might be a RVer if…your spouse is now referred to as the GPS.

You might be a RVer if…your idea of a “well manicured lawn” is a clean patio mat.

Worth Pondering…

You Might Be a RVer If you plan all of your business trips based upon availability of campsites.

Discover Usery Mountain Regional Park

The spectacular desert mountain scenery here is breathtaking

Usery Mountain Regional Park, one of 13 Maricopa County Regional Parks, is a 3,648 acre preserve at the western end of the Goldfield Mountains, adjacent to the Tonto National Forest. Located on the Valley’s east side, Usery Mountain contains a large variety of plants and animals that call the lower Sonoran Desert home.

Usery Mountain is where my love of and discovery of The West began. That would be early April 1987 when we spent a week in site 48.

At that time, I wrote in my journal: “The spectacular desert mountain scenery here is breathtaking. When we first arrived in Arizona our reaction was why would anyone winter in this dreary, harsh, unforgiving desert environment, let alone live here. The Sonoran Desert grows on you with a beauty all its own. And the beauty of Usery Mountain is absolutely stunning.”

And we have enjoyed camping here numerous times since.

Along the most popular feature of the park, the Wind Cave Trail, water seeps from the roof of the alcove to support hanging gardens of Rock Daisy. The Wind Cave is formed at the boundary between the volcanic tuff and granite on Pass Mountain. Breathtaking views from this 2,840-foot elevation are offered to all visitors.

Usery Pass is known for being a major sheep trail leading from the high country north of Mt. Baldy south to the Salt River Valley. Flocks of sheep, led by Mexican and Basque shepherds with their dogs, present a picturesque sight in the spring and fall as they move into or out of the Coconino plateau region.

The traditional account of settlement of the Salt River Valley credits a former Confederate Officer and gold seeker, Jack Swilling, with the beginning of modern irrigation in central Arizona. Swilling came into the Valley in 1867 and noted the presence of ancient canal systems of the early Native Americans who had irrigated these lands.

Swilling presumably traveled between John Y.T. Smith’s hay camp a few miles east of downtown Phoenix and Fort McDowell in the summer of 1867 and came within sight of Usery Mountain Park, and even closer to the ruins of an old canal system and an ancient Native American village situated between the park and the Salt River.

Usery Mountain Regional Park became a park in 1967. Pass Mountain, also known as “Scarface” to the local folks, is the geological focal point of the park. The mountain itself was named for King Usery (sometimes spelled Ussery). “King” was his first name, rather than a title. He was a cattleman who was running stock in the area in the late 1870s and early 1880s. He had a tough struggle to survive and, apparently losing ground, moved up into the Tonto Basin country where his activities provided him a kind of unwanted security…behind bars.

Usery Mountain offers over 29 miles of trails for hiking, mountain biking, and horseback riding. Park trails range in length from 0.2 miles to over 7 miles, and range from easy to difficult.

These trails are very popular because they have enough elevation to offer spectacular vistas of surrounding plains. Whether you are looking across the plain, flat land, south of the recreation area, or to the west or north, great distances and surrounding mountains can be seen and enjoyed.

Arguably the most popular hike at Usery Mountain is the 3.2-miles Wind Cave Trail up Pass Mountain. Although the elevation gain is 820 feet, it’s considered a moderate hike. Views from this 2,840-foot elevation are breathtaking.

If you are looking for an easy, relatively short hike, the Merkle Trail is barrier-free. For a long more difficult hike, try the 7.1-mile Pass Mountain Trail. All trails are multi-use unless otherwise designated. Always remember to carry plenty of water and let someone know where you are going.

The park’s modern campground offers 73 individual sites. All sites are paved and have water and 50/30-amp electric service, a picnic table, barbecue grill, fire ring, and can accommodate up to a 45-foot RVs. Other facilities include modern washrooms with flush toilets and hot showers, and a dump station. All sites can be reserved online.

Nightly camping fee is currently $32. Non-refundable reservation fee is $8. For non-campers, the day use fee is $7.

Usery Mountain is best explored from late autumn to early spring as summer temperatures routinely exceed 100 degrees.

Worth Pondering…
We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know that place for the first time.
— T. S. Eliot, Little Gidding