Spending Time in Nature Just Might Save the World

Nature is not a refuge—it’s a forge that transforms us

Spending time outdoors can serve as a forge that brings out the best in us.

Nature transforms us

What’s come down are medical studies showing time in nature does a multitude of good things for our health. Add to that the brainwave studies showing the benefits to our mental health. Top it off with the sociological studies showing time in nature leads to increased creativity.

Improved health and creativity are just what the doctor ordered.

In sum, we now have the science to justify it: nature is a forge in which much-needed world-saving values are brought to life.

Ajo Scenic Loop in southern Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Still stuck in the old paradigm

While our appreciation of what nature does for us has evolved, the way our culture looks at time spent in nature, unfortunately, is still much the same. Despite what we know about the benefits of spending time in nature, our culture still views time spent there as passive. It’s often spoken of as a retreat or escape.

Our attitude reflects the society we grew up in. “Nature is so relaxing.” “I go hiking to get away from it all.” “The outdoors is my happy place.” We hear these phrases. The problem is that they’re limiting. They pigeonhole nature and the role nature can play for us.

Even though we now have awe theory and forest therapy, even though we know about the three-day effect and have books like The Awakened Brain and The Comfort Crisis we’re stuck in the old paradigm that defines time in nature is a form of recreation—and holds that the real work takes place when we’re sitting at a board meeting or behind our laptops.

It’s not nature that needs to change, but us.

Wells Gray Provincial Park, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The new paradigm

These are dire times and the old paradigm of nature as recreation no longer makes the cut. If we as a species are to shift onto a less self-destructive path, we need to access the values-shifting awarenesses nature can provide.

If the next generation is to care about protecting the natural world, they need to have had positive experiences in it. If these changes are to come about, we need to value nature more broadly and spend time in nature with broader intentions. We need more access to green spaces for those who live in cities. Nature needs to be more than a place to relax. And, so of course, it’s not nature that needs to change, but us.

We need a new paradigm. We need a new story to tell ourselves about nature and the time we spend in it.

Simply put, we need to embrace the idea that nature isn’t so much a place to retreat and relax but rather a forge that can transform us.

Bernheim Forest, Kentucky © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

For the good of the people

The idea that spending time in nature can lead to personal transformation is not new. Far from it! Seers and prophets have been going out into the wild since the beginning of human civilization. When they went, they weren’t going on vacation. They weren’t sipping mai tais by a pool.

Native Americans—and many other indigenous cultures—had a tradition of the vision quest in which young people on the verge of adulthood would go out into nature alone in order to experience spiritual growth.

Black Elk of the Oglala Sioux tells a story from his childhood in which a tribal leader welcomes a group of young men back from a scouting mission with the words, “Whatever you have seen, maybe it is for the good of the people you have seen” (Niehardt 65).

Those simple words signify recognition of what the young people did and its importance. The young people left the community and went forth into the wild. Their purpose was to see. Their seeing was beneficial not just to themselves but to their community. It was “for the good of the people.”

Roseate spoonbills in Sabine National Wildlife Refuge in Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Nature helps us save ourselves from ourselves

It’s a small shift—thinking of nature as a forge rather than a retreat—but it makes a big difference. I’m reminded of the well-known Thoreau quote, “In wildness is the preservation of the world.”

Wildness and wilderness can strengthen and preserve us. I have no doubts about that. But the bulk of the world seems to have little interest in wildness. How then could the wildness be important to the world or have a chance of saving it?

The solutions to the problems of today are unlikely to spontaneously show up on the screens of our cell phones. The solutions might just manifest themselves when we’re out in nature, however. This is because nature is a rich source of complexity, mystery, and inspiration; nature is a bottomless well, a source that counters and supplements all that is human.

In light of the new paradigm, in light of what we now understand in terms of how crucial nature is to our health, in light of our dependence on nature for everything from new medicines to new technology, and in light of the popularity of rewilding now—more than ever—we can see Thoreau’s words as being amazingly prospicient.

Custer State Park, South Dakota © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

In wildness is the preservation of the world.

Over the course of history, our preoccupation with technology has led humanity to stray from nature but if we’re to survive and if our planet is to thrive (some would say survive) we must ever circle back. And so the time ahead may later in history be seen as the great circling back—a time when people rediscover the power of nature to strengthen our bodies and nurture our spirits. A time when we acknowledge that to be the best versions of ourselves, we need nature—and that nature is an inexhaustible source of new understandings.

Worth Pondering…

I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order.

—John Burroughs

The Beginner’s Guide to Hiking

Hiking for beginners can be intimidating but there’s really not much to it. You don’t need any special skills to hike; you just have to be able to walk and know where you are. It’s a great way to immerse yourself in nature, get a good workout in, and recharge your batteries. This guide will give you some essential hiking for beginners’ tips to make your hike safe and fun.

Hiking is a wonderful way to immerse yourself in the outdoors. Transported by your own two feet and carrying only what you need for the day on your back you can discover the beauty of nature at whatever pace you’re comfortable with. And, with a little planning and preparation, it’s an activity that almost anyone can do.

Hiking, a timeless and invigorating outdoor activity has been a favorite pastime for individuals seeking a harmonious blend of exercise, nature, and adventure. Whether you’re a fitness enthusiast or a novice to the world of outdoor activities, hiking provides an excellent opportunity to reconnect with nature, improve physical well-being, and embark on a journey of self-discovery.

In this article, I’ll delve into the essence of hiking, highlighting its benefits and why it is an ideal activity for beginners. Moreover, I’ll underscore the inclusivity of hiking, catering to individuals of various fitness levels.

Hiking Catalina State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is hiking and its benefits

Hiking is a form of outdoor recreation that involves walking or trekking through natural landscapes, often along trails or footpaths. Unlike more structured exercises, hiking allows participants to immerse themselves in the beauty of nature offering a refreshing break from the hustle and bustle of daily life. The benefits of hiking extend beyond the physical realm encompassing mental and emotional well-being.

Physical fitness

One of the primary advantages of hiking is the positive impact it has on physical health. As a weight-bearing exercise, hiking helps improve cardiovascular health, strengthen muscles, and enhance overall endurance. The varied terrain encountered during hikes engages different muscle groups providing a comprehensive workout for the body.

Mental well-being

The therapeutic effect of nature is well-documented and hiking serves as a conduit to experience it firsthand. The serene landscapes, fresh air, and the rhythmic act of walking contribute to reduced stress levels, improved mood, and enhanced mental clarity. Hiking provides a valuable opportunity to unplug from technology and connect with the present moment.

Hiking Badlands National Park, South Dakota © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Social interaction

While hiking can be a solo endeavor, it also presents an excellent opportunity for social interaction. Group hikes allow individuals to share the experience with friends or meet like-minded individuals fostering a sense of community and camaraderie. Conversations flow more freely in the relaxed setting of nature strengthening social bonds.

Why hiking is ideal for beginners

Hiking’s appeal lies in its simplicity and adaptability making it an excellent choice for individuals new to outdoor activities. Here are several reasons why hiking is an ideal starting point.

Low entry barrier

Unlike some sports or fitness routines that require specialized equipment or skills, hiking has a remarkably low entry barrier. A comfortable pair of walking shoes, appropriate clothing, and a water bottle are sufficient for a beginner’s hike. This simplicity encourages more people to try hiking without the need for significant initial investment.

Hiking Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Flexible intensity

Hiking offers a wide range of intensity levels accommodating individuals with diverse fitness backgrounds. Beginners can choose trails with gentle inclines and shorter distances gradually progressing to more challenging routes as their fitness improves. The ability to tailor the intensity of a hike makes it accessible to individuals of all ages and fitness levels.

Connection with nature

For those unaccustomed to regular physical activity the prospect of heading to a gym can be intimidating. Hiking, on the other hand, provides a natural and scenic environment offering a more appealing setting for exercise. The desire to explore nature often serves as a strong motivator for beginners to lace up their hiking boots and hit the trails.

Varied terrain

Hiking trails come in various forms from easy, well-groomed paths to more rugged and challenging terrains. Beginners can choose trails that match their comfort level and gradually progress to more demanding routes. This adaptability ensures that hikers can tailor their experience to suit their fitness and skill levels.

Hiking Cades Cove, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Accessibility for people of different fitness levels

One of the most remarkable aspects of hiking is its inclusivity. Regardless of age, fitness level, or prior experience, there is a hiking trail suitable for everyone. Here’s why hiking is accessible to people of different fitness levels:

Trail diversity

Hiking trails are available in a range of difficulty levels from beginner-friendly to advanced. Novices can start with flat, well-marked trails, gradually progressing to more challenging routes with steeper inclines and uneven terrain. National and state parks often classify trails by difficulty helping hikers make informed choices.

Customizable distances

Hiking allows individuals to customize the length of their journey based on their fitness level and preferences. Beginners can start with short, leisurely hikes and gradually increase the distance as they build stamina. The ability to set one’s pace makes hiking an accommodating activity for people at different fitness levels.

Hiking Custer State Park, South Dakota © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Supportive hiking communities

The hiking community is generally welcoming and supportive providing resources and encouragement for individuals at all levels. Local hiking clubs and online forums offer valuable advice, trail recommendations, and shared experiences fostering a sense of inclusivity and making the transition into hiking smoother for beginners.

Adaptability to health conditions

Hiking can be adapted to accommodate various health conditions and mobility levels. Many trails are wheelchair-accessible and nature reserves are increasingly mindful of creating inclusive outdoor spaces. Those with health concerns can consult with healthcare professionals to find suitable trials and modifications that cater to their specific needs.

Hiking Catalina State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Choose your hiking gear

One of the wonderful things about hiking is that you don’t need a bunch of high-tech gear to get out there. With a few essential items for the trail and a sense of adventure, you’re ready to head into the wilderness.

Hiking footwear

Footwear is one of the most important items you need to choose and it’s a very personal choice. Some hikers prefer supportive over-the-ankle boots while others enjoy lightweight trail-running shoes. The terrain you’ll be walking on can also affect your decision. 

Food and water

As a beginner hiker, it can be tough to know how much food and water you need. A good general recommendation for how much to eat is 200–300 calories per hour. About a quart for every two hours of moderate activity in moderate temperatures is a good starting place for water intake. These amounts depend heavily on several factors such as the intensity of your hike, the weather, your age, your sweat rate, and your body type. As you gain more experience, you’ll get a better sense of just how much you need.

Hiking Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Appropriate clothing

Wide-brimmed hat or hat with a neck cape protects the head, face, and neck. Light-colored, light weight, long sleeve shirt protects shoulders, arms, and back. Light color reflects back more heat and light weight allows perspiration to evaporate.

In the realm of outdoor activities, hiking stands out as an accessible, adaptable, and immensely rewarding pursuit. Whether you’re seeking a stroll through scenic landscapes or a more challenging trek to test your limits, hiking offers something for everyone.

The physical, mental, and social benefits make it an ideal activity for beginners. So, lace up your hiking boots, explore the trails, and embark on a journey that not only enhances your well-being but also allows you to discover the wonders of nature.

Hiking Badlands National Park, South Dakota © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Here are some helpful resources for hikers of all levels of experience:

Worth Pondering…

As soon as he saw the Big Boots, Pooh knew that an Adventure was about to happen, and he brushed the honey off his nose with the back of his paw and spruced himself up as well as he could, so as to look Ready for Anything.

—A. A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh

23 Pros and Cons of the RV Lifestyle in 2024

Welcome to my article about the pros and cons of the RV lifestyle! If you’re considering a life on the road or are just curious about the benefits of RV living, you’re in the right place.

I’ve compiled a list of 23 reasons why the RV lifestyle can be an amazing experience and 23 reasons it can be challenging.

This is the time of year people are making plans and becoming an RV nomad is an option many are exploring whether for full-time RV living, snowbird lifestyle, or as weekend warriors and vacation escapes whenever they can get away.

But, like everything in life, there are pros and cons to consider.

From increased freedom and flexibility to the opportunity to spend more time in nature there are so many advantages to living in an RV.

And there are lots of challenges or cons that are involved, too.

So while for many of us, it can be an exciting and fulfilling experience, it’s important to be aware of the RV living challenges you may face along the way.

In this article, I’ll explore 23 reasons why the RV lifestyle may be for you and 23 reasons why it might not!

Let’s start with the positive reasons to embrace the RV lifestyle.

Lower Colorado Potash Scenic Byway near Moab, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

23 RV lifestyle pros

From increased freedom and flexibility to the opportunity to spend more time in nature, there are so many advantages to living in an RV that it’s hard to list just 23. Dania and I have been living the RV snowbird lifestyle for 25+ years and on every new adventure we find a new benefit.

We can confidently say from experience that whether you’re a digital nomad looking to work remotely, a senior seeking new adventures, or a family looking to bond and create lasting memories, the RV lifestyle has something to offer for everyone.

So read on to learn more about the numerous benefits of this unique and exciting way of life.

Freedom to travel and explore new places at your own pace has to be the very top benefit of the RV lifestyle on almost everyone’s list. Wanderlust lovers find a unique fulfillment in this lifestyle.

Canyon de Chelly National Monument in northeastern Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

1. Ability to live a minimalist lifestyle and declutter (or sell) your home. Life today can be complicated. The RV lifestyle forces you to do with less—and that can be a good thing.

2. An opportunity to meet new people and make lasting friendships. If you are a warm and friendly person you will come into contact with so many new people with different backgrounds that your life will be greatly enriched.

3. Ability to spend more time outdoors and in nature. In an RV, you can live right in the middle of God’s awesome creation.

4. Flexibility to work remotely or take extended vacations. Thanks to technology with many jobs you can now work from anywhere your RV is parked. All you need is good Internet and technology keeps improving those connection speeds.

5. Potential to save money on housing and other expenses (notice I said potential). If you budget wisely and can do some basic maintenance and repairs yourself and like to camp off the grid, you can indeed save money.

6. Increased family bonding and quality time spent together.

7. Ability to travel with pets and have them with you at all times.

8. Potential to save money on transportation costs by driving your home with you. Fuel prices have been on a roller coaster lately but for those who work from home, there’s no commute time because your home is your RV.

8. Ability to enjoy a variety of different destinations and climates in one trip. Don’t like the weather? Hitch up and head to somewhere where it’s nice.

9. Opportunity to try out different locations and see where you might want to settle down. Many use an RV to explore the country to find the perfect spot where they can put down permanent roots someday.

Daytona Beach, Florida © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

10. Increased sense of adventure and spontaneity in your daily life—–trust me on this, it’s NEVER boring!

11. Ability to have all your belongings with you at all times rather than relying on storage or shipping. You learn to minimize. That is very freeing.

12. Greater sense of control over your living environment and surroundings. Home is where you park it. That’s the ultimate in freedom.

13. Ability to customize and personalize your RV to fit your needs and preferences. It’s so much easier to redecorate an RV than a house or apartment.

14. Opportunity to learn new skills such as basic vehicle maintenance and camping techniques. RV owners tend to be much more self-reliant than non-RVers.

15. Potential to reduce your environmental impact by using a smaller, more efficient living space.  We have a small house but a big yard.

16. Increased physical activity and outdoor recreation opportunities. RVers tend to be fitter and healthier than non-RVers because they do much more.

17. Ability to be self-sufficient and live off the grid if desired. Thanks to solar power and things like lithium batteries, it’s possible to actually be energy independent in an RV.

18. Potential to save money on entertainment by dining out by cooking and enjoying meals in your RV. Most serious RVers prefer cooking their own meals because they usually are camped well out of town.

19. Increased appreciation for the simple things in life. There’s truth in the saying, “Less is more.”

20. Ability to disconnect from the distractions and stresses of daily life and focus on what matters most—time with loved ones, being connected to nature, slowing down, and de-stressing.

21. Opportunity to create lifelong memories and experiences with your loved ones.

22. Opportunity to experience regional culture and cuisine. You can do a deep-dive into any given region. Find all the hidden treasures and sites often overlooked by vacationers. The slower pace is one of the most advantageous aspects of RV living.

23. Spend money on experiences, not things. The final advantage of living in an RV is that you can spend your money on experiences rather than on things. You will be making memories every day that will last a lifetime.

Bernheim Forest south of Louisville, Kentucky © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

23 RV lifestyle cons

While the RV lifestyle can certainly be an exciting and fulfilling experience, it’s important to be aware of the RV living challenges that you may face along the way. From limited space and amenities to maintenance and budgeting many aspects of the RV lifestyle can be challenging to navigate.

This was a hard list to compile. Almost all of these RV lifestyle cons can be overcome. However some personality types don’t do well with new challenges and problems. There is a learning curve to the RV lifestyle.

So in this section, I’ll explore 23 common RV living challenges that people may encounter while living in an RV. I’ll also suggest how you can overcome them.

Whether you’re a seasoned RV enthusiast or a newcomer to the lifestyle these challenges are worth considering before hitting the road.

Longfellow-Evangeline State Historic Park, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

1. Limited space. RVs can be cramped and may not have as much storage or living space as a traditional home.

2. Hooking up utilities. Setting up and connecting utilities including water, electricity, and sewer can be challenging and time-consuming. Then there’s the unpleasant task of dumping the black tank.

3. Maintenance. RVs require regular maintenance such as checking and replacing fluids, cleaning and inspecting the exterior and interior, and performing routine upkeep. Things will break. When you are driving down the road, your RV is going through the equivalent of a 4.0 earthquake!

4. Driving and maneuvering. Operating an RV is more challenging than driving a car especially when it comes to parking, backing up, and navigating tight spaces. In heavy traffic or on congested city streets you will need to be extra alert and careful.

5. Weather and road conditions. RVs can be affected by adverse weather conditions and rough roads which can make traveling more difficult.

6. Finding campsites. It can be difficult to find campsites or RV parks that are suitable and available, especially during peak travel seasons.

7. Limited privacy. RVs often have thin walls and limited privacy which can be challenging for people who value their personal space. In campgrounds, your neighbors may be parked just 10 feet away!

8. Limited amenities. Some RV parks and campsites can be somewhat rundown and may not have all the amenities that a person is used to such as laundry facilities, dog runs, level spots, and reliable Wi-Fi.

9. Limited resources. Most RVs do not have the same resources as a traditional home such as a full-size fridge or freezer, an oven, or a dishwasher. Closet and storage space can be limited.

Elephant Butte State Park, New Mexico © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

10. Budgeting. The cost of purchasing, insuring, and maintaining an RV as well as paying for campsites and fuel can be expensive and requires careful budgeting. That old saying Count the cost before embarking on such a change in life is very true regarding finance.

11. Limited access to certain areas. Some roads and areas may be inaccessible to RVs due to their size or weight restrictions. You will want to carefully plan routes to be sure overpass and bridge clearances on secondary roads will safely let your RV pass beneath.

12. Limited socialization. The RV lifestyle can be isolating at times as people may not have the same opportunities to socialize or participate in community activities as they would in a traditional neighborhood. Each time you move camp and set up somewhere else you will have to adjust to a new community. If you are socially awkward, this can be a challenge.

13. Separation from family and friends.The RV lifestyle may involve spending long periods of time away from family and friends which can be challenging for people who value close relationships. You will need to find new ways to stay in touch like FaceTime or Zoom. You will want to plan for regular trips back home for in-person visits.

14. Limited access to healthcare. Some areas may not have adequate healthcare facilities or services which can be challenging for people who require regular medical care. Telemedicine for travelers can help a lot.

15. Limited internet and phone service. Some remote areas may not have reliable internet or phone service which can be a challenge for people who need to stay connected for work or personal reasons.

16. Limited access to groceries and other supplies. It can be difficult to find groceries and other supplies in some areas especially if you are traveling to remote or rural locations.

17. Limited access to entertainment. Depending on where you are traveling you may have limited access to entertainment options such as movie theaters, concerts, or sporting events.

18. Dealing with breakdowns and emergencies, RVs can and will break down and you will experience the same emergencies and other issues that happen in everyday life while you are on the road. Dealing with them in unfamiliar new locations can be stressful and costly.

19. Escalating fuel costs. This has become a major concern and a dealbreaker in recent months for many new fulltime RVers especially those on a fixed income.

20. Limited pet-friendly options. It can sometimes be difficult to find pet-friendly RV parks or campsites which can be a challenge for people who travel with pets.

21. Limited accessibility. Some RVs may not be accessible for people with disabilities or chronic medical conditions as they may not have features such as ramps or handrails.

22. Limited vehicle options. RVs come in various sizes and styles but some people may have difficulty finding an RV that meets their needs or preference.

23. Adjusting to a different way of life. The RV lifestyle is a significant change from living in a traditional home and it may take some time for people to adjust to a different way of living. This can be challenging for some people who are used to a certain routine or way of life.

Enchanted Rock State Natural Area in Central Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

There you have it—23 pros and 23 cons of the RV lifestyle!

Consider using these two lists as a checklist. Which of these is more important to you? Sort through them and find your own way of managing them.

Which of these would you rather spend $200 on?

Going on an all-day whale watching trip which includes sightings of multiple bears and cubs searching for eels along the beach, sightings of numerous humpback whales and porpoises, dozens of different species of sea birds, and the star of the show, the orcas, which are everywhere. All the while the captain is narrating a captivating story of the wildlife and the native cultures that are intrinsically woven around that wildlife. Oh yeah, and the trip includes lunch. 

OR 

Buying a new table lamp or wall hanging depicting sea life!

Where to next?

Explore Arizona with my RV adventure guide:

Worth Pondering…

If you wait for the perfect moment when all is safe and assured, it may never arrive. Mountains will not be climbed, races won, or lasting happiness achieved.

—Maurice Chevalier

14 Awesome New Skills to Learn in 2024

With a New Year come new possibilities

As we move further into 2024 there are all sorts of opportunities to learn new skills.

Whether you want to become a sommelier or professional photographer there’s a world of new skills out there to master and I’m here to spur your imagination.

This is a list of 14 awesome new skills to learn in 2024.

Here we go!

Photographing birds at Whitewater Draw in southern Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

1. Learn photography

Photography is a lot of fun and it’s also a valuable skill.

Whether you want to start with just learning the basics of snapping better photos on your smartphone or are looking to upgrade to a professional camera, there are many wonderful resources to become a great photographer.

I recommend starting with this list of helpful articles:

2. Start a stamp collection

Nowadays it’s all about text messages and e-mails but back in the day people sent these incredible things called letters. And to send them they used stamps.

Stamps are actually very cool and collecting stamps teaches you so much about history, geography, and the world.

Growing up my uncle got me into stamp collecting and I just loved getting packages of stamps from him and fitting them into the stamp collecting book.

It’s easy to get started in just a few simple steps. You don’t have to buy expensive equipment to enjoy this hobby. Some simple stamp-collecting accessories will serve you well.

You’ll need some stamps to get started but it makes sense to spend more on stamps and a lot less on equipment than vice versa. The basic equipment I recommend includes:

  • A pair of stamp tongs or tweezers
  • Magnifying glass
  • Stamp albums
  • Hinges (small gummed strip that’s used to fix a stamp to the page of an album)
Wine tasting at Black Hills Winery near Oliver, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

3. Become a sommelier

You know what would go down really smooth right now?

A nice, classy, delicious glass of wine! Red, white, rose, you name it!

If you want to take it up a notch, learn the art of being a sommelier, a professional wine taster who is also an expert in pairing wines with food and grading them.

Even if you don’t do it as a job it’s an impressive skill to have.

Are your taste buds tingling? I have some articles on wineries, wine regions, and wine tasting:

Truth BBQ in Brennan, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

4. Start smoking

Another excellent skill to try out is smoking. I don’t mean cigarettes or cigars, of course, I mean food!

Smoking meat is a stupendous skill and the result is mouth-wateringly delicious meats. You will need a smoker but it’s well worth the money and the variety of flavors of smoke you can do is amazing.

You don’t need a decade of practice to get the hang of smoking but it’s more demanding than a round of grilled cheese. First, there’s the heat—you’ll want the temperature low over a long period. And then there’s the smoke—you need to keep it smoking for hours.

In addition to hardwood and charcoal, you’ll also want:

  • A culinary brush used to swab meat with sauce
  • A mop, a tool that looks like a miniature mop that is used to apply sauce
  • A rib rack (if you plan on smoking ribs)

I expect to be invited over later to share in the tasty treats.

Check this out to learn more: Texas BBQ: By Meat Alone

5. Write a blog

Blogs are very rewarding and interesting and almost anyone can write one!

As for the subject matter think about what you love, hate, find funny, or what makes you unique.

Then write, video, and post photos about it on your blog. Readers will start coming and taking a look at what you’re up to.

6. Start journaling

Keeping a journal is something I’ve done for years.

But I will say that the journaling I have done has been rewarding and helped me get my thoughts in order. There’s just something about getting your words on the page that helps clarify various situations, thoughts, and even dreams.

Here are some tips for starting and keeping a journal.

7. Find inner peace

Inner peace is underrated. When you feel good about yourself many things fall into place and even those aspects of life which are kicking your ass stop crushing you so badly.

You get back in the driver’s seat of life refocus on what’s in your control and rediscover that inner peace that’s so vital to survival and thriving.

Inner peace is a skill we could all use more of, 100 percent.

Take up knitting © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

8. Knitting

Knitting is nifty and you can learn it in no time flat.

Whether you embark on an ambitious project like knitting a sweater or something simpler like a small scarf, knitting is an enjoyable and absorbing activity. Try out knitting and see how it goes.

9. Become a biker

One of the best exercises you can do is bicycling. For less than you think you can be outfitted with a mountain or road bike, a helmet, and a nifty backpack to go on short trips.

Then head out into the fresh air and enjoy our beautiful planet.

Get started with cycling today.

10. Practice better planning

Planning is a skill that ties all sorts of other skills together. When you get better at planning you get better at…well…everything.

There are simple things like keeping an agenda, various online scheduling tools, making a vision board, and more but there are also techniques and mindsets which will help you plan more consistently in your life.

Here’s an excellent guide on planning a cross-country road trip.

11. Pick up healthy habits for longevity

Having a few good days is enjoyable but having a life of healthy habits can add years to your longevity and make the time you have on our planet all the more amazing.

Picking up healthy habits for longevity isn’t just about exercise, a healthy diet, and breathing well, either. It’s also about healing and owning those difficult emotions and experiences that challenge us in life and optimizing our mental and emotional health.

Let’s call this self-actualization.

12. Learn to canoe or kayak

If you want to learn to canoe or kayak your best bet is to go to an outdoors or boating store and see if they offer lessons and rentals.

By the way, I have a post on Exploring National Water Trails.

Horseback riding in Lost Dutchman State Park in Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

13. Learn to ride a horse

Equestrian sports are an excellent hobby although they can add up in price.

Having said that, going for a trail ride and learning basic horse riding is not necessarily that expensive. If you have a love of the outdoors and have always hankered to try out horse riding there are all sorts of opportunities to try it out and see what you think.

Look for a paddock near you that offers trail rides.

Spend time in nature © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

14. Spend time in nature

There’s nothing quite as healing and spiritually revivifying as spending time in the great outdoors. Listening to the loons out on the lake and contemplating the horizon or walking a quiet forest trail as shafts of sunlight danced between the trees has a kind of magic that nothing else can match.

Nature has been linked with the divine and with spiritual regeneration since the earliest days of humankind and it’s still a place of refuge and peace every day for people all across the world.

As Taoism founder Lao Tzu put it: Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished.

An amazing insight for all of us to ponder!

Worth Pondering…

You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.

—Les Brown

Camping Activities Guide

Fun things to do while camping

It doesn’t matter how you camp—in a tent or an RV. Camping is an opportunity for serious fun and activities. Moreover, it’s an experience that you can customize for your family’s interests based on the season and where you’re camping.

You don’t have to pack to the hilt to stay entertained. In fact, there are plenty of simple activities for your next family vacation by the lake or in the mountains. 

Here’s my super RVing with Rex Checklist of Camping Activities.

Fishing is a favorite camping activity © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Camping activities: Water-based activities

There are tons of exciting things you can do in the water if your campsite is near a lake, seashore, river, pool, or other body of water. Some are very active; others are for lazy relaxing days. Slip on your bathing suit and have some fun in the water—here’s how:

  • Fishing
  • Swimming
  • Floating or lounging
  • Canoeing or kayaking
  • Boating
  • Water skiing
  • Tubing
  • Water volleyball or basketball
  • Diving
  • Snorkeling
  • Water balloon fight
Hiking is a favorite camping activity © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Camping activities: Sports-related activities

Not all camping and RV resorts have a full list of amenities. If you’re rustic camping in the wild or you’re somewhere with limited amenities—or maybe just want some more variety—here are some great ideas to stay active with your family:

  • Disc golf (Frisbee golf)
  • Horseshoes
  • Ringtoss
  • Corn Hole
  • Lawn bowling
  • Soccer
  • Football
  • Kickball
  • Baseball
  • Biking
  • Hiking
  • Nature walks
  • Spelunking/caving (make sure you have an experienced guide with you)
  • Capture the Flag
  • Hide and Seek
  • Tag (there are dozens of variations)
  • Red Rover
Combining photography with birdwatching © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Camping activities: Nature-related activities

Part of the joy of camping is being closer to nature. Explore the great outdoors more with these activities. Be sure to respect the area where you are. Don’t disturb or damage the wildlife.

  • Birding (bird watching)
  • Animal watching
  • Photography
  • Sketching
  • Catching fireflies
  • Collecting leaves
  • Cataloging rocks
  • Fossil hunting
  • Exploring
  • Search for wild berries, nuts, and other edible plants
  • Watch the sunrise/sunset
  • Camping scavenger hunt
  • Geocaching
Canoeing is a favorite camping activity © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Camping activities: Winding down activities

Staying active and enjoying the day is an important part of every camping trip. But you also need to embrace the down time and give your mind and body a rest. Camping to relax and get away from daily stress? Here are some great ways to relax and enjoy the family camping trip:

  • Swing in a hammock
  • Watch the trees blowing in the breeze
  • Listen to nature
  • Take lots of naps
  • Daydream and let your mind wander
  • Float on the water
  • Stargaze
Fishing is a favorite camping activity © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Camping activities: Downtime activities

Maybe the kids need some downtime in the tent. Or perhaps someone isn’t feeling well. There could be some unexpected weather that is keeping you indoors.  Of course, you could just be relaxing under the protection of your tent to escape the bugs. There are plenty of things you can do inside the tent or RV either alone or with friends and family:

  • Read books and magazines
  • Read aloud to each other
  • Card games
  • Board games
  • Crafting (knitting, sewing, drawing)
  • Watch movies on portable devices
  • Play on other electronic devices (iPods, iPads, Gameboys, etc.)
  • Make up stories to tell each other
  • Snuggle
Enjoying nature is a favorite camping activity © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Camping activities: Evening activities

The camping trip doesn’t end when the sun sets. A whole slew of activities become available when evening comes and dark settles on the campground. The darkness is a thrilling time while family camping because you’re not dealing with the lights and commotion of the city. Check out these awesome evening activities:

  • Sit around the campfire
  • Sing campfire songs
  • Play a guitar or other instrument
  • Dance around the fire
  • Try out new varieties of s’mores
  • Make colored fire (packages of colored fire crystals or pine cones are sold at many camping supply stores)
  • Make shadow puppets
  • Go for a nighttime walk (with a flashlight, of course)
  • Stargaze
  • Play flashlight tag
  • Play hide and seek in the dark
  • Go for a midnight swim
  • Play glow in the dark bowling. Put glow sticks in 2-liter bottles filled with water. Use a ball to knock them down.
  • Tell ghost stories
  • Play Truth or Dare

Now that you have great ideas for things to do while camping, it’s time to get out there and try them.

Enjoying nature while camping © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Related Posts:

Worth Pondering…

I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order.

—John Burroughs

5 Best Things to do this Spring in America

A whole new world of color opens up during springtime which makes it the perfect time to pack up the RV and explore somewhere new on a road trip or weekend getaway

Springtime can be a magical and refreshing time to travel. Maybe you’re coming out from winter hibernation for a quick road trip or you’re finally able to break in those new hiking boots you were gifted for Christmas. Personally, I look forward to blooms and greenery after nature wakes up from her winter slumber. Everything feels fresh, new, and exciting.

1. Attend a spring festival

When spring has sprung, the festivals are in full bloom! Festivals in spring are wonderful, inspiring experiences that help us celebrate the start of a new season. Which one of these takes your fancy?

International Cherry Blossom Festival, Macon, Georgia

Macon, Georgia, is the cherry blossom capital of the world? No, it’s not Japan or Washington, D.C. With 350,000 cherry trees blossoming each year at the end of March, Macon truly is the perfect place to see these beauties in bloom.

The second or third week of March is peak time to visit as the International Cherry Blossom Festival (March 17-26, 2023) happens. It’s known as the pinkest party of the year! Macon is full of history and is also surrounded by beautiful state parks for visitors who are looking to get outdoors.

Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival, Woodburn, Oregon

Tulips are the main attraction in Woodburn, Oregon. The town is home to the Wooden Shoe Tulip Far which hosts a tulip festival from March to May. With 40 acres of tulips, over 200 acres of outdoor space, and activities, the Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival is identified as one of the top spring attractions in the state of Oregon. The 38th Annual Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival runs March 17–April 30, 2023.

Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Springtime is also the best time to catch a ride on a hot air balloon to see the colorful blooms from above. Or stay on the ground and enjoy a sip of wine at any of the areas wineries while your pals fly high in the sky.

Rayne loves frogs © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Rayne Frog Festival, Rayne, Louisiaa

Rayne is best known as the Frog Capital of the World. The Rayne Frog Festival was founded in 1973 and has grown by, um, leaps and bounds. At this annual fest, you can see the coronation of the Frog Festival Queens and the Mr. and Miss Tadpole contests.

The 51st Annual Rayne Frog Festival will be held on May 10-14, 2023 at the Frog Festival Pavilion. It’s slated with a full schedule including music, delicious food, a signature festival drink, and souvenir cup commemorating 51 years of tradition, arts and crafts show, carnival rides, frog cook-off, frog-eating contest, folklore tent, frog racing and jumping, and a few surprises along the way.

Charleston home tours © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Festival of Houses and Gardens, Charleston, South Carolina

It’s no secret that Charleston is a hub for southern charm especially in the spring as dogwood trees and azaleas bloom all over the city. The weather is great during this time of year–hanging out around 60-70 degrees with low humidity―ideal weather for both carriage tours and walking tours of the main attractions of the city.

The premier event of its kind in the country, the 75th Annual Spring Festival of Houses and Gardens, March 15-April 16, 2023 offers guests rare access into some of Charleston’s finest private houses and gardens in the city’s renowned historic district during peak blooming season. The cornerstone of the spring Festival are the daily house and garden tours. The tours provide an opportunity for guests to go inside the private houses and gardens of some of America’s most beautiful residences, some dating to the 18th century.

Ostrich Festival © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Ostrich Festival, Chandler, Arizona

Grab your friends and family and get ready to shake your tail feather with our favorite feathered friends, the ostriches! The Ostrich Festival features live ostriches, national and local entertainment, stage shows, over 50 midway rides and games, classic festival food, interactive activities for all ages, meet and greets with your favorite mascots, ostrich-themed educational activities, exciting attractions, upscale arts and crafts and much more. The 33rd Annual Ostrich Festival will be held March 16-19, 2023 at Tumbleweed Park in Chandler, Arizona.

A spring road trip in Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

2. Plan a spring road trip

The weather is warming up and late winter rains have turned trees and grass green and encouraged wildflowers to bloom. It’s the right time to take a drive either to a favorite place or a new destination with unfamiliar landscapes and roads. Whether your preferred scenery is mountains, deserts, forests, plains, or coastal views, there’s a road trip for you. You can plan a journey around your interests if you enjoy historic sites, regional food, wineries, or nature, you can plan a journey around your interests.

Clingmans Dome, Great Smoky Mountains National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Great Smoky Mountains, Tennessee and North Carolina

You’ll love springtime in the Great Smoky Mountains as the gorgeous wildflowers are in bloom with over 1,500 types dazzling in mid to late March to June. You’ll find perfect picnic weather at this time of year and it’s an ideal time to explore the most visited national parks in the U.S. Enjoy the 800 square miles of untouched wilderness while you enjoy a scenic hike to a waterfall or beautiful overlook. Horseback riding, fishing, ranger-led programs, wildlife viewing, and biking are other popular activities in the park.

Joshua Tree National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Joshua Tree National Park, California

One of my favorite things about visiting national parks is the transformation that occurs in the landscape around me as I enter a park. The distinctive flora and unique geological features create an atmosphere that makes me feel as if I’m entering another world. Joshua Tree National Park is one of those magical places. The sharp angles of the Joshua tree forests are the foreground of a wonderland of gigantic granite boulders and rock outcroppings. It’s an otherworldly landscape that takes you back thousands of years. You feel as if you might see a dinosaur step out from behind one of the jumbo rock piles at any moment.

Mesa Verde National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Trail of the Ancients, Utah, Colorado, and Arizona

Experience the beautiful and diverse landscapes of the Colorado Plateau on the Trail of the Ancients, a scenic route that travels through Southeastern Utah, Southwestern Colorado, and Northeastern Arizona. It connects some of the nation’s richest archaeological, cultural, and historic sites in a remote region teeming with towering sandstone formations, deep canyons, and iconic red buttes.

Hovenweep National Monument © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The adventure can begin at any point on the trail but many choose to start at the famed Four Corners Monument and then travel in a counter-clockwise circle. Along the way, you’ll see the cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde National Park and the archaeological sites of the Hovenweep National Monument. You’ll white-knuckle it down the hairpin turns of the Moki Dugway and marvel at the sandstone monoliths and pinnacles of the Valley of the Gods.

Shenandoah National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Shenandoah National Park

Skyline Drive takes you 105 miles through the park along the crest of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains. This route stretches through Shenandoah National Park where warm spring weather brings purple and yellow violets, masses of pink azaleas, and white dogwood flowers.

Skyline Drive features 75 overlooks including Spitler Knoll, Range View, and Hogback, all of which offer unobstructed views across the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Picacho Peak State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Picacho Peak State Park, Arizona

Winter showers make February and March wildflowers in the desert parks and create yet another reason to explore this beautiful region. During years of average and above average precipitation, it seems every direction you look there is beautiful yellow, red, white, orange, blue, or purple flowers blanketing the landscape. Arizona had a good, rainy winter so far, so our hopes are up for a bright blanket of flowers soon!

The contrast of vibrant flowers against the backdrop of green is a sight to behold so get your camera, comfortable outdoor shoes, and plenty of water and enjoy the rich colors across the state.

Picacho Peak State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Picacho Peak is arguably one of the best spots to see blooming wildflowers and cactus in Arizona with bushels of incredible golden blooms throughout the park. The desert wildflowers here offer a unique and beautiful contrast to the green and brown hues of this Sonoran Desert park.

3. Back to Nature

Time spent outdoors in nature can have many health benefits including reducing stress and increasing cardiovascular health.

Grasslands Nature Trail, Padre Island National Seashore © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Padre Island National Seashore, Texas

The most significant undeveloped barrier island in the world, Padre Island National Seashore offers more than 130,000 acres of dunes, grasslands, and beaches―a national park and a haven for all sorts of family-friendly activities. Immerse yourself in the fauna and flora that populate this marshland environment with a short stroll along the Grasslands Nature Trail. Away from the beach, this trail offers a glimpse of animals that live inland including coyotes, deer, kangaroo rats, ghost crabs, and many others.

Malaquite Beach, Padre Island National Seashore © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Apart from the actual sands of Malaquite Beach, Padre Island’s Visitors Center holds a breathtaking observation deck for wildlife viewing. Along Malaquite Beach, visitors scavenge for small shells deposited by north currents at Little Shell Beach and comb through the sands of Big Shell Beach for larger shell discoveries. Whichever activity you partake in, it’s safe to say that Padre Island National Seashore is a beachside paradise for a gorgeous getaway.

Bernheim Forest © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Bernheim Arboretum and Forest, Kentucky

Are you looking to connect with nature? Bernheim is the place to do it. With 16,140 acres of land in Bullitt and Nelson Counties in Kentucky, there is an adventure waiting for everyone. Purchased by German immigrant Isaac W. Bernheim in 1929, the land was dedicated as a gift to the people of his new homeland.

Whether it’s hiking one of the many trails, fishing in Lake Nevin, enjoying public art, reading under a tree, or taking part in a scheduled program, Bernheim offers visitors unique opportunities to connect with nature. Over 40 miles of trails with varying degrees of ease and difficulty weave their way through the forest at Bernheim meaning no matter what level you are looking for, there’s a trail for you.

Breaux Bridge Crawfish Festival © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

4. Take a culinary tour of America

Go in search of fresh flavors this spring on a culinary trip across America.

Food Festivals

For foodies, warmer weather means one thing: a host of new food festivals to attend where you can eat and drink across the country. Here are seven food festivals to put on your travel list this spring.

  • SoCal Taco Fest, San Diego, California, April 29, 2023
  • Vidalia Onion Festival, Vidalia, Georgia, April 20-23, 2023
  • Breaux Bridge Crawfish Festival, Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, May 5-7, 2023
  • Blue Ribbon Bacon Festival, Des Moines, Iowa, February May 12-13, 2023
  • Nantucket Wine & Food Festival, Nantucket, Massachusetts, May 17-21, 2023
  • Cheese Curd Festival, Ellsworth, Wisconsin, June 23-24, 2023
Hiking Great Smoky Mountains National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

5. Go hiking

In my mind, there are few things more rejuvenating than hiking or walking in nature. One of the biggest reasons I fell in love with the RV lifestyle is that beautiful nature is so accessible wherever you are. It seems like I am always just minutes away from a spectacular trailhead. Whether I am hiking in the mountains or traversing trails in the desert, nature is a refuge—it’s a change of pace from city life, from being stuck inside, from being sedentary.

Blue Mesa Loop, Petrified Forest National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Blue Mesa Loop, Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona

This mile-long trail takes you into a landscape brushed in blue where you will find cone-shaped hills banded in a variety of colors and intricately eroded into unique patterns. Descending from the mesa this alternately paved and gravel trail loop offers the unique experience of hiking among petrified wood as well as these badland hills.

Gulf State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Hugh S. Branyon Backcountry Trail, Gulf State Park, Alabama

Gulf State Park features 28 miles of paved trails or boardwalks including seven trails of the Hugh S. Branyon Backcountry Trail complex that inspire visitors to explore the nine distinct ecosystems within park boundaries.

Giant Forest, Sequoia National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Big Trees Trail, Sequoia National Park, California

Located next to the Giant Forest Museum, the Big Trees Trail is one of the best short and easy hikes you can do in Sequoia. This loop trail takes you completely around the meadow and provides impressive views of numerous massive sequoias as well as the beautiful meadow itself.

Courthouse Towers © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Park Avenue Trail, Arches National Park, Utah

The 4-mile out and back hike is easy and has minimal elevation gain. Walk down into the vast canyon, passing endless rows of mesmerizing conglomerates on your way to the memorable Courthouse Towers. Along the way, enjoy long-range views of the La Sal Mountains as you walk by iconic formations such as the Organ, Sheep Rock, and Three Gossips.

Getting out and traveling can sometimes be the best way to kick the winter blues especially if you live somewhere that gets very little sunshine. Enjoying the beauty of spring in any one of these destinations is sure to help you recharge and reset. Whether you want to get out and hit the trails or simply sit back and enjoy an afternoon of peace somewhere with warmer temperatures, you’re sure to find a great trip on this list.

Worth Pondering…

Come with me into the woods. Where spring is advancing as it does no matter what, not being singular or particular, but one of the forever gifts, and certainly visible.

—Mary Oliver, Bazougey

On the Pursuit of Happiness

Finding the calm in the storm of life

Very little is needed to make a happy life; it is all within yourself, in your way of thinking.
—Marcus Aurelius

Happiness is the only worthy pursuit.

There is a saying there are only two things guaranteed in life: death and taxes. It’s not wrong is it?

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

There is one idea that remains, only one idea that makes sense: to be as happy as you possibly can. In 2019, Ipsos carried out a study and found that only 14 percent of people were very happy. Among 28 countries surveyed, happiness is most prevalent in Canada and Australia (both with 86 percent of adults describe themselves as “very” or “rather” happy) followed by China and Britain (83 percent), France (80 percent), and the United States (79 percent).

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

With so many options to spend our time and money, it’s easy to get stuck in a state of consumption. We consume food, television, and social media. In recent years, we also started consuming “experiences.”

We feel the pressure to keep spending. We fear that without consumption life is boring. We have this unhealthy drive to buy happiness.

It makes me think of Viktor Frankl, the famous author who survived the Holocaust. In his book, Yes to Life, he debunks the idea of pursuing happiness.

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

“Happiness should not, must not, and can never be a goal, but only an outcome… all human striving for happiness, in this sense, is doomed to failure as luck can only fall into one’s lap but can never be hunted down.”

Martin Seligman (1942-), a strong promoter of positive psychology, theorizes that 60 percent of happiness is determined by our genetics and environment and the remaining 40 percent is how we choose to respond. He summarized fulfillment and happiness as “consisting of knowing what your highest strengths are and using them to belong to, and in the service of, something larger than you are.”

Related article: Experience the Journey Within

There are dozens of researchers like Seligman who have studied the art and science of happiness. I’ve dived into the habits of the happiest people and decided to share them with you here. Here are the ingredients to a happy life.

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

1. Less is more

An ancient Greek philosopher named Diogenes of Sinope (c. 412-323 B.C.) built the idea that he has the most who is most content with the least.

Today we see this play out in many ways, most notably with the minimalism movement. Essentially it plays into this idea that a life lived with less ‘stuff’ leads to a happier one because in the absence of these desires you can enjoy the real stuff in life. The happiest people desire much less than the average Joe.

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

2. The seduction of speed

There is more to life than increasing its speed.
—Mahatma Gandhi

Modern life and modern business tend to center around speed. Convenience stores, fast food, next-day delivery, all of that stuff is about not waiting. Rushing through and not spending time absorbing everything life has to offer. Not enjoying the smallest aspects of life for what they are leads to a lesser life. Slowing down can lead to enjoying the world around you. The happiest people abandon rushing about for the sake of slowing down.

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

3. Relax

Calm mind brings inner strength and self-confidence, so that’s very important for good health.
—Dalai Lama

The dictionary definition of “relax” is aspirational and healing: “to make or become less tense or anxious.” For some folks, relaxation takes the form of zoning out in front of a TV. For others, gardening or tending to the house offers calming effects. Whatever your chosen method of relaxation—whether it be time spent horizontally in a hammock or RVing to your favorite camping site—rest should be a built-in part of everyone’s daily routine.

Related article: The Power of Mindfulness

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

4. Deep reading

Books are not the quickest way to consume information. The new era of information gathering means books are perhaps one of the slowest. However, time, depth, and attention all matter when comprehending new information. The time it takes to read a book, to read a book is the very thing that makes it magical. It demands your undivided attention for a considerable time. The happiest people give that willingly.

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

5. Live life today

We’re so busy watching out for what’s just ahead of us that we don’t take time to enjoy where we are.
—Bill Watterson, creator of Calvin & Hobbes

Life can be sabotaged by thinking of the past and worrying about the future. You forget what is right in front of you. That can lead to a life less lived. Instead, spend time at this moment. You are right there, absorbing the words here and asking questions of yourself at the moment.

That’s what the happiest people I know do.

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

6. Little is large

Everyone is trying to accomplish something big, not realizing that life is made up of little things.

—Frank A. Clark

It’s the smallest things in life that we often overlook as a total inconvenience. Mowing the lawn, washing the dishes, cleaning the house, weeding the garden, washing the RV! They all feel like necessary evils. You speed through them to make it to the other side and then you can enjoy your day. Not so fast; the small things make up most of your day. The happiest people enjoy the small things—they know they are the big things.

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

7. Enjoy the moment

It turns out that taking the time to “smell the roses” truly does enhance happiness in life. When you enjoy the small moments—good or bad—you’re more aware of what’s happening around you. The happiest people focus on what they can control and it’s possible to choose happiness at the moment, no matter the struggles you may be going through.

Related article: Bird Therapy: On the Healing Effects of Watching Birds

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

8. Growth mindset

In the book Mindset, Carol Dweck explains that the most successful and happy people have what she calls a “growth mindset” compared to a “fixed mindset.” A fixed mindset seeks success as an affirmation of intelligence or worth; a growth mindset thrives on challenge and sees failure not as evidence of unintelligence or unworthiness but as a catalyst for growth and stretching beyond existing abilities. After twenty years of research, Dweck concluded that those with a growth mindset had happier relationships, achieved more success, and were much more persistent through challenges.

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

9. Have a dream

Without a future to look toward, the past is the only thing we can look back on. Whether your dream is to travel America in an RV, start your own business, or learn a new language, having a dream is one of the most important things in remaining optimistic when things get tough. This concept of having a purpose is especially prevalent in Eastern Asia. In Japan, there’s an actual term called ikigai which is translated as “the reason you wake up in the morning.” When some of the happiest and longest-living people were studied, they all had such a reason.

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

10. Luck and life

Luck (or random chance) question talent. Work hard and be successful. Save money and have enough for a rainy day. Build good habits and live a long life. The reality though is that people who do these things can still get unlucky. They become ill or make a bad decisions. While I can do everything in my power to take advantage of the opportunities afforded to me, I can also recognize the rightful place of bad luck and not beat myself up at every setback. What about you? Does recognizing the role of random chance make you feel better or worse? Do you agree that much of life is due to luck? The happiest people understand that random choice is a large part of life and they accept it for what it is.

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

11. Lifetime Learning

Despite his early onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease, Stephen Hawking has made prominent scientific discoveries. What is more, he has found the words to tell the world about his findings. Like Hawking, the happiest people all have one thing in common. They are lifelong learners, constantly reading new books, exploring other cultures, learning new languages, etc. It is an ongoing process because without growth there’s no life.

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The happiest 14%

It’s easy to rush through life, forgetting all the little things, focusing on tomorrow, and wanting all the things that big advertisers show you.

It’s easy to compare and question ‘why not me?’ when it comes to success and money. Those things are built in us by the markets that consume us. If we want for more and strive for better, we buy more and more.

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Instead, though, the happiest people enjoy life for what it is, a game of luck. And find joy in the tiny things, like mowing the lawn or reading a good book.

I always remind myself of this. Happiness is a byproduct of usefulness. Of dedicating your life to something bigger than you!

Related article: On Camping and Spending Time in Nature

When you find something and dedicate your life to it, joy will arise automatically.

What makes you happy? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Worth Pondering…

Happiness resides not in possessions and not in gold, happiness dwells in the soul.
—Democritus (c. 460-c. 370 BC)

Just living is not enough… one must have sunshine, freedom, and a little flower.

—Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875)

It isn’t what you have, or who you are, or where you are, or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. It is what you think about.

—Dale Carnegie (1888-1955)

Discover the National Forests during Great Outdoors Month

America’s National Forest system stretches over 193 million acres of vast, scenic beauty waiting to be discovered

During this Great Outdoors Month, try to imagine you inherited millions of acres of forest and grasslands teeming with wild animals, brilliant wildflowers, deep blue lakes, rushing rivers, unspoiled beaches, and majestic mountains and all within a few hours’ drive. You would suddenly feel like the luckiest person on Earth.

Lassen National Forest, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

You are. With nearly 200 million acres of forest and grasslands, the USDA Forest Service lands are available for all to use. And these forest lands are open for all to recreate 365 days of the year—unless a natural disaster or maintenance issues force a closure. So, get outdoors and enjoy those natural landscapes this summer—or anytime, for that matter.

Sequoia National Forest, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The national forests and grasslands are 193 million acres of vast, scenic beauty waiting for you to discover. Visitors who choose to recreate on these public lands find more than 150,000 miles of trails, 10,000 developed recreation sites, 57,000 miles of streams, 122 alpine ski areas, 338,000 heritage sites, and specially designated sites that include 9,100 miles of byways, 22 recreation areas, 11 scenic areas, 439 wilderness areas, 122 wild and scenic rivers, nine monuments, and one preserve. And remember, it’s all yours to discover.

Related: Elevate Your Hiking with Mindfulness

Coronado National Forest © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The available activities are as big as your imagination and the national forests. Camping, hiking, biking, birding, boating, fishing, rock climbing, and swimming are good starting points. For instance, in California, just outside of the massive metropolis of Los Angeles County, lies the 700,000-acre Angeles National Forest. For the 10 million-plus people who live in the LA area, this forest is a treasure trove of fun, challenging, and exciting outdoor activities, and, yes, it’s big enough for all to share.

Sabino Canyon © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

And if you think the national forests are only for trees, think again. Just north of Tucson in the southern portion of Arizona’s ponderosa pine-dotted Coronado National Forest, you’ll find an easy-to-access recreation area called Sabino Canyon. In this vibrant desert landscape, you’ll see towering saguaro cacti—some as impressive as the great conifers of the forests. Visitors walk, jog, hike, do wildlife viewing, photography, and so much more.

The Coronado National Forest spans sixteen scattered mountain ranges or “sky islands” rising dramatically from the desert floor supporting plant communities as biologically diverse as those encountered on a trip from Mexico to Canada.

Madera Canyon © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Madera Canyon is a popular destination for wildlife watchers and nature lovers who come to see the more than 240 species of birds (including more than a dozen species of hummingbirds) that live in its nurturing environment.

Related: The 10 Most Breathtaking National Forests in America

Fishlake National Forest, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Traveling northeast are the great Colorado Rocky Mountains where 14,000-foot high peaks are not uncommon. Seriously, there are 53 of them! Just outside the city of Colorado Springs is Pikes Peaks. It is one of the most well-known of the great 14,000-footers. Keep in mind that the most experienced hikers consider climbing Pikes Peak a challenge so just walking around the foothills isn’t a bad idea for the less seasoned hikers among us.

Buffalo Gap National Grasslands © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

After you cross the Continental Divide, the mountains begin to melt away—a process that has taken millions of years—as you enter the Great Plains. Here sweeping grasslands like those on Colorado’s nearby Comanche National Grasslands and South Dakota’s Buffalo Gap National Grasslands near Badlands National Park invite visitors to hike pleasant trails and see the wildflowers and tall grasses that once stretched from Colorado to the Mississippi River.

Black Hills © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The Black Hills in western South Dakota and northeastern Wyoming consist of 1.2 million acres of forested hills and mountains approximately 110 miles long and 70 miles wide. The name “Black Hills” comes from the Lakota words Paha Sapa, which means “hills that are black.” Seen from a distance, these pine-covered hills rising several thousand feet above the surrounding prairie appear black.

Black Hills © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Amid the splendid scenery of the Black Hills, National Forest is 11 reservoirs, 30 campgrounds, 32 picnic areas, two scenic byways, 1,300 miles of streams, over 13,426 acres of wilderness, and 353 miles of trails, and much more. Every location in the Black Hills is a special place but there are hidden gems around every corner.  

Related: On Camping and Spending Time in Nature

Once you cross the Mississippi River, the mountains begin to rise again but these mountains, far older than the Rockies, are literally part of the oldest lands on earth. In fact, the Appalachian Mountains were once right up there in height with Mount Everest.

White Mountains National Forest © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Now the tallest mountains in the eastern United States rarely break 6,000 feet but the views they offer are spectacular. Check out the George Washington and Jefferson Forest straddling Virginia and West Virginia overlooking the serene Shenandoah Valley, the bare granite summits of New Hampshire’s White Mountain National Forest, or the breathtaking mountain views of North Carolina’s Nantahala National Forest.

Nantahala National Forest © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

One of just two national forests in New England, the White Mountain National Forest is a year-round adventure destination. Crowned by the highest peaks in the region—the Presidential Range—the national forest includes the largest alpine zone in the Eastern U.S. For hikers, more than 1,200 miles of hiking trails wind through hardwood and conifer forests offering access to secluded waterfalls, glassy ponds, and granite peaks.

Nantahala National Forest © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The Nantahala National Forest lies in the mountains and valleys of southwestern North Carolina. The largest of North Carolina’s four national forests, the Nantahala encompasses 531,148 acres with elevations ranging from 5,800 feet at Lone Bald to 1,200 feet along the Hiwassee River. The Forest is divided into three Districts, Cheoah in Robbinsville, Tusquitee in Murphy, and the Nantahala in Franklin. All district names come from the Cherokee language. “Nantahala” is a Cherokee word meaning “land of the noonday sun,” a fitting name for the Nantahala Gorge where the sun only reaches the valley floor at midday.

Read Next: The Reason for Which You Wake up in the Morning

With so much public land available from coast to coast, no matter where you are you can find opportunities to recreate in the Great Outdoors!  

Worth Pondering…

I like trees because they seem more resigned to the way they have to live than other things do.

—Willa Cather

On Camping and Spending Time in Nature

Spending time in nature is the best way to refuel your body and your mind

The Great Outdoors became a top travel destination in 2020 for obvious reasons: endless social distance, campgrounds within driving distance, and dramatic settings for an existential crisis. Zoom ahead to summer 2022 and the world has reopened—so has camping fallen out of favor?

Turns out, instead of returning their REI equipment, many rookies are still adding camping reservations to their travel plans.

According to Campspot, a platform for reserving campsites, there are 49 percent more bookings for this summer compared to last year and a six times jump in new campers.

33 percent more people are shopping on Amazon for camping tents this year compared to 2019 and demand for other outdoor gear (lanterns, backpacks, camp stoves) has also risen by double digits, per data analytics company Pattern.

Reunion Lake RV Resort, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Glamping’s also holding onto its pandemic popularity: Getaway, which rents tiny, posh cabins you may have seen on Instagram had its most guests ever in Q1 2022.

Between inflation, the stock market, supply-chain issues, and recession fears, people have a strong desire to find ways to disconnect from the stress and spend time in nature to help them reconnect with themselves and their family and friends.

Relaxing nature activities will rejuvenate your mind, from the simple to the life-changing.

The back roads of Kentucky’s Blue Grass Country © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Savor the scenery

Movies beaming with CGI (computer-generated imagery) dazzle our imaginations but the most mind-blowing spectacles are not found on a screen. When was the last time you watched the sunrise or ventured to the nearest hilltop to watch it set? Or plied the back roads?

A back road in South Carolina © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The back, back roads of South Carolina, for example, will present you with a gift basket of surprises. Looming magnolia trees and Spanish moss! Tiny, rural communities populated with folks who more than likely will be happy to spend the afternoon beguiling you with the stories of their lives. Makeshift farm stands and BBQ pits that you can sniff out a mile away. Ramshackle houses and dilapidated plantations evoking chapters from another world!

Skyline Drive © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Skyline Drive is a beautiful Virginia byway that goes straight through Shenandoah National Park and the picturesque Blue Ridge Mountains. It’s not exactly a well-kept secret, but if you hit the road early enough to catch a misty sunrise, you might be able to beat some of the crowds. At just over 100 miles long, it makes for a great half-day drive.

Walking a trail in Great Smoky Mountains National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Wander the wilderness

Walking is good for you, but not all walks are created equal. Cruising urban streets doesn’t provide the same mental boost as hiking a local trail or feeling the sandy beach between your toes. You don’t have to have a specific destination in mind, either—your goal isn’t to hike a particular number of miles but to aimlessly immerse yourself in the natural world around you. The Japanese call this “forest bathing” and it can rejuvenate a weary mind.

Enchanted Rock © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Short, sweet, and steep are the best descriptors of the flagship trail at Enchanted Rock State Natural Area. Characterized (and named for) a massive pink granite dome—the same unique Texas pink granite that was used to build the State Capitol building—this park is a popular outing for those visiting Central Texas. From the top of the steep Summit Trail, you’ll see unparalleled 360-degree views of untouched terrain. For more entertainment, Fredericksburg, a charming German-Texan small town, is only a 20-minutes drive away.

Bird watching in Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Meditate on the music

Not the music playing in your headphones. Leave your electronics behind and listen to the melodies nature has to offer: babbling brooks, bird songs, wind whistling through the trees, and the scurrying of animals through the canopy. It’s a lot more relaxing than the honking horns and text message alerts you’re all too used to and it offers the opportunity to practice some meditative mindfulness in your tranquil surroundings.

Pack a picnic

Load a basket with your favorite healthy goodies and have lunch among the flora and fauna. A picnic is a perfect way to spend quality time with friends and family without the distractions of the modern-day world. And nature makes socializing with others easier so it’s the perfect place to build stronger relationships with those you love.

Fishing at Lynx Lake in Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Go fish

Fishing puts you outside, near a body of water, and it rewards patience. All of those are good things. Even if you don’t catch (and release) anything, you’ll both forge a treasured, lifelong memory. With a little luck, you reel in a perch that will grow into a marlin after multiple retellings of the story at family events.

Bird watching © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Look, up in the sky

Thousands of people who watch birds as a hobby are on to something: There’s a special thrill when you can recognize a bird by sight or by its sound. Odds are, a nearby Audubon location offers free birding walks that are open to the public. Or, turn to the internet for free resources to help you identify the birds in your area. Either way, bird watching gives you the perfect excuse to relax in nature with your head in the clouds. That’s a great way to fend off stress.

Camping in Arches National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Sleep beneath the stars

Now you’re getting serious. Why not disconnect entirely for several days or more and make nature your home? Camping lets you get further away than a simple day trip allows. Or, if roughing it isn’t your style, consider glamping where you can maintain some of the creature comforts you love, but still be away from it all.

Camping in Custer State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Located in the rugged Black Hills of South Dakota, Custer State Park protects 71,000 acres of terrain and a herd of some 1,300 bison who are known to stop traffic along the park’s Wildlife Loop Road from time to time. The park has nine campgrounds to choose from including the popular Sylvan Lake Campground. Many sites include electric hookups and dump stations.

If you take your phone, use it for that cool star-gazing app (or emergencies, of course) but not for scrolling social media 24/7. Forget the Fear of Missing Out and try the Joy of Missing Out instead. #JOMO!

World’s Largest Roadrunner at La Cruces, New Mexico © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What’s that giant roadrunner doing there? Read about the weird world of giant roadside attractions

Listen up: This is the only summer playlist you’ll need

Looking for a memorable road trip: Choose a location and route that aligns with your passions

Applegate River Valley, Oregon © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

More trip ideas: These are the best things to do this summer

And finally: Here’s what to expect at national parks this summer

Worth Pondering…

Take time to listen to the voices of the earth and what they mean…the majestic voice of thunder, the winds, and the sound of flowing streams. And the voices of living things: the dawn chorus of the birds, the insects that play little fiddles in the grass.

—Rachel Carson

Doctors Can Prescribe Year-Long Pass to Canada’s National Parks

Doctors can now prescribe access to nature with the Parks Canada Discovery Pass to patients through the national nature prescription program

Imagine going to your doctor and, instead of a prescription for some named or generic pharmaceutical, you instead receive a prescription for a 30-minute walk in nature. This is not actually that far-fetched. Put down the Prozac and pick up your walking shoes.

Enjoying nature at Devonian Gardens Botanical Park near Edmonton, Alberta © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Paracelsus, the 16th-century German-Swiss physician, wrote: “The art of healing comes from nature, not from the physician.” He could not have imagined the advent of the Smartphone, nor a 24/7, digitally enhanced, Instagram-able world.

Enjoying nature in Jasper National Park, Alberta © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Much has been written about the evils (and glories) of technology but the resulting dissociation from our natural surroundings leaves us emotionally and physically worse off. We are bereft of nature. Our bodies—and our minds—need nature. And there is hard science to prove it.

In fact, there is enough science about the health benefits of nature to get the attention of the medical profession. Nature as medicine. Just don’t tell Big Pharma.

Enjoying nature in Elk Island National Park, Alberta © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Canada is famous for its pristine waterways, soaring snowcaps, and beautiful forests from coast to coast to coast. Thanks to a new partnering agreement, health care professionals in four Canadian provinces can now prescribe time in the national park system to boost people’s mental and physical health.

Related Article: National Parks Inspire Love of Nature

Parks Canada is collaborating with a program called Park Prescriptions (PaRx). Doctors, nurses, and other licensed health care professionals who register with the program can prescribe nature—and even a Parks Canada Discovery Pass—to their patients.

Enjoying nature at Lesser Slave Lake Provincial Park, Alberta © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

“We are very lucky in Canada to have a world of beautiful natural spaces at our doorstep to enjoy healthy outdoor activities. Medical research now clearly shows the positive health benefits of connecting with nature,” Steven Guilbeault, Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, said in a written statement.

“This exciting collaboration with PaRx is a breakthrough for how we treat mental and physical health challenges and couldn’t come at a better time as we continue to grapple with the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on our daily lives.”

Enjoying nature at Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park, Alberta © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

PaRx is an initiative of the BC Parks Foundation, driven by health-care professionals who want to improve their patients’ health by connecting them to nature. Featuring practical resources like quick tips and patient handouts, its goal is to make prescribing time in nature simple, fun, and effective.

Each prescriber who registers with PaRx will receive a nature prescription file customized with a unique provider code and instructions for how to prescribe and log nature prescriptions.

Enjoying nature at Banff National Park, Alberta © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Parks Prescriptions began as a grassroots movement in the United States over a decade ago. We are proud to be Canada’s first national, evidence-based nature prescription program.

Related Article: How Much Time Should You Spend in Nature?

Parks Canada has provided 100 adult Discovery passes this year and will reassess this number in future years. An annual Parks Canada Discovery Pass covers admission to more than 80 destinations for 12 months. The pass sells for $72.25 and provides unlimited access to national parks, national marine conservation areas, and national historic sites for 12 months. The park system is already free for anyone 17 and under.

Enjoying nature at Wells Gray Provincial Park, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The BC Parks Foundation is the official charitable partner of BC Parks and the provincial park system. It launched PaRx—Canada’s first national nature prescription program—in November 2020 in British Columbia. In 2021, it expanded the program to Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba.

Enjoying nature at Brae Island Regional Park near Langley, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Winning a prestigious Joule Innovation prize from the Canadian Medical Association, it has garnered widespread enthusiasm across the country with over 1,000 prescribers registered. Doctors, nurses, and other licensed health care professionals are able to add Parks Canada Discovery Passes to the doses of nature they prescribe.

Enjoy nature at Sunshine Valley, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Until now, the nature prescriptions revolved around working out what kind of nature time people should consider, and not something tangible like a park pass. For now, only people in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Ontario are eligible for the Parks Canada passes but the PaRx hopes to expand to Quebec, Alberta, and New Brunswick soon and eventually roll out in every province and territory.

Enjoying nature in Jasper National Park, Alberta © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

“I can’t think of a better way to kick off 2022 than being able to give the gift of nature to my patients,” said PaRx director Dr. Melissa Lem, a family physician. “There’s a strong body of evidence on the health benefits of nature time, from better immune function and life expectancy to reduced risk of heart disease, depression, and anxiety, and I’m excited to see those benefits increase through this new collaboration.”

Enjoying nature in the Okanagan Valley, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Participating prescribers who can prescribe a Parks Canada pass are asked to prioritize patients who live close to national parks, historic sites, or marine conservation areas, and who could benefit from it the most.

For years doctors have discussed the healing qualities of nature and in 2006 a group of doctors in Albuquerque, New Mexico launched Prescription Trails, the first nature-prescribing program. Other programs launched soon afterward, and in 2019, Betty Sun of the Institute at the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy said there were 71 programs of this nature operating in 32 different U.S. states.

Enjoying nature at Wells Gray Provincial Park, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Nature prescriptions were one of the top eight global wellness trends in 2019 and are cropping up around the world. Countries such as the United Kingdom are now investing in park prescription pilots to help tackle mental and physical health problems and the resulting strain on their health care systems and economies.

Related Article: Get Outside and Enjoy Nature

Enjoying nature at Banff National Park, Alberta © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

PaRx was recently recognized by the World Health Organization in its COP26 Special Report on Climate Change and Health where it was featured as a way to inspire protection and restoration of nature as the foundation of our health—one of only two case studies cited from North America.

Enjoying nature at Mount Robson Provincial Park, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

“Research shows that children and adults who are more connected to nature are not only more likely to work to conserve it but also engage in other pro-environmental behaviors,” said Lem. “I like to think that every time one of my colleagues writes a nature prescription, we’re making the planet healthier, too.”

Enjoying nature along the Fraser River in Hope, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

PaRx has been endorsed by the BC Family Doctors, Saskatchewan Medical Association, Nurse Practitioners Association of Manitoba and Ontario College of Family Physicians. It offers practical, evidence-based online resources like quick prescribing tips and printable fact sheets, plus a green-time target of “two hours per week, 20+ minutes each time.”

Related Article: Best Parks and Gardens to Connect with Nature

As Canada grapples with the ongoing pandemic, it’s a critical time for health care professionals to promote the mental and physical health benefits of heading outdoors.

Enjoying nature near Valemont, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

“Our goal is to make sure that people who need it can get out easily and affordably to benefit from the healing power of nature,” said BC Parks Foundation CEO Andy Day. “So far, through the generosity of our donors and partners, we have provided free trips and nature therapy sessions during the pandemic to health care workers, seniors, refugees, and vulnerable youth. It’s been incredibly inspiring to see the impact nature has on people.”

Worth Pondering…

Nature holds the key to our aesthetic, intellectual, cognitive, and even spiritual satisfaction.

—E. O. Wilson