Go on a Donut Day Adventure on National Donut Day

The first Friday in June—June 7 this year—is National Donut Day

What is round, fried, makes your mouth water and has its own national holiday?

Donuts! The glazed, cream-filled, varied beauties are celebrated each year. While the taste alone is enough to celebrate, National Donut Day actually has a meaningful history rooted in the American spirit.

Today, most people celebrate without understanding the history. The holiday has been commercialized by donut shops nationwide with some serving up everything from free donuts to donut contests.

Keep reading to learn more about National Donut Day and when and how to partake in the festivities.

National Donut Day © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is National Donut Day?

You might be surprised but National Donut Day is a holiday. Its history which we trace below is much more than about the tasty treat.

But today the holiday is celebrated in many creative ways paying homage to the donut. Some donut shops have a special flavor, others, like Krispy Kreme and Dunkin’ gives everyone a free donut just for showing up.

When is National Donut Day?

National Donut Day falls on the first Friday of June every year. This year, Friday, June 7 is National Donut Day.

There is also a second, but less popularly celebrated National Donut Day. November 10 is the birthday of the United States Marine Corps. Americans convinced the Vietnamese to help them celebrate by giving out donuts in honor of the occasion.

Since then National Donut Day is also celebrated by some on November 5. The celebration is speculated to have originated from that event in Vietnam.

There was no shortage of donuts during November in Vietnam. The 200 female American Red Cross volunteers or Donut Dollies turned out about 20,000 donuts daily for GIs.

National Donut Day © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The history of National Donut Day

With so many food holidays out there, it’s pretty easy to trivialize their significance. But National Donut Day has a filling as rich as the custard of a Boston cream donut.

National Donut Day dates back to World War I. The female volunteers of the Salvation Army cooked donuts for American GIs overseas. The tradition carried on through the Great Depression.

During the Great Depression, the Chicago Salvation Army claimed National Donut Day as an official holiday in order to celebrate the female volunteers who championed the GIs during the war. It became official in 1938.

These female volunteers became known as Donut Dollies. They would each make upwards of 300 donuts a day—by hand.

The female volunteers who made donuts were called dough girls or dough lassies. They continued to serve donuts to GIs during World War II. Throughout various wars like the Vietnam War soldiers continued the tradition of eating donut-like food wherever they were serving.

Prisoner of war Orson Swindle had his soldiers observe the holiday during the Vietnam War by serving them sweet sticky buns. Eventually, bakeries and civilians alike started celebrating every year by eating a rich sweet donut.

National Donut Day © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The importance of National Donut Day

Beyond its historic importance, National Donut Day celebrates one of America’s most beloved treats. Although donuts are actually believed to be from the Netherlands and immigrated to New York with the Dutch. Nevertheless, 56 percent of Americans said they’ve taken donuts to their office.

Because it only comes once (and sometimes twice) a year, it is important for donut shops to seize the opportunity. Many shops celebrate and monetize National Donut Day by preparing marketing campaigns well in advance.

National Donut Day timeline

  • 1809: One of the earliest accounts of donuts are attributed to Dutch settlers that brought them over to New York
  • 1918: The Salvation Army sets up canteens in the frontlines of World War I to provide care and donuts for soldiers
  • 1920: Adolph Levitt, a refugee from Russia designs a gadget to help him keep up with the demand for donuts at his shop
  • 1989: The Simpsons is aired for the first time and the world is introduced to Homer, a true donut lover
National Donut Day © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Donuts by the numbers

  • 10 billion: Number of donuts made in the U.S. each year
  • 10: Number of people living in America with Donut as their surname
  • 13: Number of people who have Donut as their first name
  • 2,480: Boston has one donut shop for every 2,480 people
  • 20: Number of donuts Renée Zellweger ate every day to gain weight for the sequel of Bridget Jones’s Diary
  • 9: Guinness World Record for the most powdered donuts eaten in three minutes
  • 201.02 million: Number of donuts consumed by Americans in 2020
  • 100,000: Number of donuts churned out by Entenmann’s every hour
  • 3,660: Number of donuts it would take to reach the top of the Statue of Liberty
  • 55 million: Number of donuts it would take to get from Long Beach, California to Long Island, New York

Top 10 donut flavors

  • Glazed: 28 percent
  • Boston Cream: 17 percent
  • Chocolate Frosted: 16 percent
  • Jelly Filled: 11 percent
  • Chocolate Cake: 7 percent
  • Maple: 6 percent
  • Blueberry: 5 percent
  • Bear Claw: 4 percent
  • Powdered Sugar: 3 percent
  • Pink Frosted: 3 percent
National Donut Day © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Top 10 favorite donut chains

  • #1: Krispy Kreme: 41 percent
  • #2: Dunkin’ Donuts: 40 percent
  • #3: Shipley Donuts: 4 percent
  • #4: Tim Hortons 3 percent
  • #5: Voodoo Donuts: 3 percent
  • #6: Daylight Donuts: 3 percent
  • #7: Entenmann’s Donuts in my own kitchen: 3 percent
  • #8: Winchell’s Donuts: 2 percent
  • #9: Lamar’s Donuts: 1 percent
  • #10: Honey Dew Donuts: 1 percent

National Donut Day activities

  • Go on a donut adventure: Visit a local donut shop but don’t go for your usual, instead allow yourself to experiment with different flavors
  • Share the love: Pick out a variety of donuts to share with family and friends
  • Fry ‘em up: Making your own donuts can be an exciting experience to share with friends and family

Worth Pondering…

With a doughnut in each hand, anything is possible.

—Jameela Jamil 

November 5 is National Donut Day Celebrating the Actual Donut

The icing and the dough cause celebration on the palate!

Who doesn’t love a good donut? The kind that melts in your mouth as soon as your palate reaches the icing! The icing and the dough cause celebration to savor.

National Donut Day (also known as National Doughnut Day) on November 5 is one of two observed by donut lovers across the nation. The first Friday in June is the other day donuts steal the bakery case spotlight ready to tease their way into the white bakery box and go home!

History disputes the origin of the donut. One theory suggests Dutch settlers brought donuts to North America much like they brought other traditional American desserts. They receive credit for such desserts as apple pie, cream pie, and cobbler. 

Donut shapes are as varied as their history. Was the original donut round? If so, American Hanson Gregory laid claim to inventing the ring-shaped donut in 1847 while working onboard a lime-trading ship. Only 16 at the time, Gregory claims he punched a hole in the center of the dough with the ship’s tin pepper box. Later, he taught the technique to his mother.

Traveling further back in time, we look at an English cookbook. According to anthropologist Paul R. Mullins, an 1803 volume included donuts in the appendix of American recipes. However, the earliest recorded usage of the term donut is found in a short story in a Boston Times article about fire-cakes and dough-nuts published in 1808. 

A more commonly cited first written recording of the word is Washington Irving’s reference to donuts in 1809 in his History of New York. He described balls of sweetened dough, fried in hog fat. The author called them donuts. Today, these nuts of fried dough are called donut holes.

Another author, William Cullen Bryant describes donuts fried in lard in his book Picturesque America or the Land We Live In which was published in 1872.

Donuts © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

So, how many National Donut Days are there?

I know of the one that falls on the first Friday in June and the one on November 5. But here’s where there is some confusion. National Donut Day in June pays tribute to the donut lassies that helped soldiers during World War I.

In 1938, Chicago’s Salvation Army started a fundraiser to help people affected by the Great Depression and to pay tribute to the Salvation Army’s Lassies who served donuts to the soldiers.

During World War I, the Salvation Army sent over 200 volunteers to France. Canteens or social centers called huts were set up in abandoned buildings to provide supplies or services like mending clothes and baked goods. Each hut included Salvation Army volunteers. It proved to be challenging to have baked goods freshly baked from these huts.

Then two of the women hit on a novel idea: what if they made donuts to remind the men of home? And so Margaret Sheldon and Helen Purviance collected excess rations for the dough and shell casings and wine bottles for makeshift rolling pins.

The soldiers loved the doughnuts and the female volunteers were nicknamed the Doughnut Girls.

During World War II, doughnuts were handed out by Red Cross Volunteers and they soon became nicknamed the Doughnut Dollies.

Other doughnut-recognized days include the following although there’s no real history behind each that I could locate. Let’s face it, we just love donuts.

  • June 8: National Jelly-Filled Doughnut Day
  • September 14: National Cream-Filled Doughnut Day
  • October 30: Buy a Doughnut Day
Donut holes © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Is it doughnut or donut?

Donut, an American variant, first appeared in the late 1800s as a contraction of the original spelling. The shortened spelling didn’t immediately catch on, however, and remained mostly dormant until midway through the 20th century.

Print ads for cake and glazed donuts and doughnuts existed since at least 1896 in the United States. George W. Peck published Peck’s Bad Boy and his Pa in 1900. It contained the first known printed use of donut. In it, a character is quoted as saying, “Pa said he guessed he hadn’t got much appetite and he would just drink a cup of coffee and eat a donut.”

In 1919, the Square Donut Company of America was founded. Square donuts offers an easier-to-package product.

The more traditional spelling is doughnut. However, both doughnuts and donuts are pervasive in American English.

Donuts come in a large variety of recipes, flavors, and toppings. However, just like many pastries, we are only limited by imagination and the ingredients at hand. From syrups and jellies to sprinkles and custards, top them, fill them, bake them, or fry them. Donuts have a mouth-watering way of glazing and dusting their way into our shopping carts. They also slip into the break room at work to share.  

Donuts © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

National Donut Day activities

  • Go on a donut adventure: Visit your favorite donut shop but don’t go for your usual, instead allow yourself to experiment with different flavors
  • Share the love: Pick out a variety of donuts to share with family and friends
  • Fry ‘em up: Making your own donuts can be an exciting experience to share with friends and family

Worth Pondering…

With a doughnut in each hand, anything is possible.

—Jameela Jamil