23 Pros and Cons of the RV Lifestyle in 2024

Welcome to my article about the pros and cons of the RV lifestyle! If you’re considering a life on the road or are just curious about the benefits of RV living, you’re in the right place.

I’ve compiled a list of 23 reasons why the RV lifestyle can be an amazing experience and 23 reasons it can be challenging.

This is the time of year people are making plans and becoming an RV nomad is an option many are exploring whether for full-time RV living, snowbird lifestyle, or as weekend warriors and vacation escapes whenever they can get away.

But, like everything in life, there are pros and cons to consider.

From increased freedom and flexibility to the opportunity to spend more time in nature there are so many advantages to living in an RV.

And there are lots of challenges or cons that are involved, too.

So while for many of us, it can be an exciting and fulfilling experience, it’s important to be aware of the RV living challenges you may face along the way.

In this article, I’ll explore 23 reasons why the RV lifestyle may be for you and 23 reasons why it might not!

Let’s start with the positive reasons to embrace the RV lifestyle.

Lower Colorado Potash Scenic Byway near Moab, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

23 RV lifestyle pros

From increased freedom and flexibility to the opportunity to spend more time in nature, there are so many advantages to living in an RV that it’s hard to list just 23. Dania and I have been living the RV snowbird lifestyle for 25+ years and on every new adventure we find a new benefit.

We can confidently say from experience that whether you’re a digital nomad looking to work remotely, a senior seeking new adventures, or a family looking to bond and create lasting memories, the RV lifestyle has something to offer for everyone.

So read on to learn more about the numerous benefits of this unique and exciting way of life.

Freedom to travel and explore new places at your own pace has to be the very top benefit of the RV lifestyle on almost everyone’s list. Wanderlust lovers find a unique fulfillment in this lifestyle.

Canyon de Chelly National Monument in northeastern Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

1. Ability to live a minimalist lifestyle and declutter (or sell) your home. Life today can be complicated. The RV lifestyle forces you to do with less—and that can be a good thing.

2. An opportunity to meet new people and make lasting friendships. If you are a warm and friendly person you will come into contact with so many new people with different backgrounds that your life will be greatly enriched.

3. Ability to spend more time outdoors and in nature. In an RV, you can live right in the middle of God’s awesome creation.

4. Flexibility to work remotely or take extended vacations. Thanks to technology with many jobs you can now work from anywhere your RV is parked. All you need is good Internet and technology keeps improving those connection speeds.

5. Potential to save money on housing and other expenses (notice I said potential). If you budget wisely and can do some basic maintenance and repairs yourself and like to camp off the grid, you can indeed save money.

6. Increased family bonding and quality time spent together.

7. Ability to travel with pets and have them with you at all times.

8. Potential to save money on transportation costs by driving your home with you. Fuel prices have been on a roller coaster lately but for those who work from home, there’s no commute time because your home is your RV.

8. Ability to enjoy a variety of different destinations and climates in one trip. Don’t like the weather? Hitch up and head to somewhere where it’s nice.

9. Opportunity to try out different locations and see where you might want to settle down. Many use an RV to explore the country to find the perfect spot where they can put down permanent roots someday.

Daytona Beach, Florida © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

10. Increased sense of adventure and spontaneity in your daily life—–trust me on this, it’s NEVER boring!

11. Ability to have all your belongings with you at all times rather than relying on storage or shipping. You learn to minimize. That is very freeing.

12. Greater sense of control over your living environment and surroundings. Home is where you park it. That’s the ultimate in freedom.

13. Ability to customize and personalize your RV to fit your needs and preferences. It’s so much easier to redecorate an RV than a house or apartment.

14. Opportunity to learn new skills such as basic vehicle maintenance and camping techniques. RV owners tend to be much more self-reliant than non-RVers.

15. Potential to reduce your environmental impact by using a smaller, more efficient living space.  We have a small house but a big yard.

16. Increased physical activity and outdoor recreation opportunities. RVers tend to be fitter and healthier than non-RVers because they do much more.

17. Ability to be self-sufficient and live off the grid if desired. Thanks to solar power and things like lithium batteries, it’s possible to actually be energy independent in an RV.

18. Potential to save money on entertainment by dining out by cooking and enjoying meals in your RV. Most serious RVers prefer cooking their own meals because they usually are camped well out of town.

19. Increased appreciation for the simple things in life. There’s truth in the saying, “Less is more.”

20. Ability to disconnect from the distractions and stresses of daily life and focus on what matters most—time with loved ones, being connected to nature, slowing down, and de-stressing.

21. Opportunity to create lifelong memories and experiences with your loved ones.

22. Opportunity to experience regional culture and cuisine. You can do a deep-dive into any given region. Find all the hidden treasures and sites often overlooked by vacationers. The slower pace is one of the most advantageous aspects of RV living.

23. Spend money on experiences, not things. The final advantage of living in an RV is that you can spend your money on experiences rather than on things. You will be making memories every day that will last a lifetime.

Bernheim Forest south of Louisville, Kentucky © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

23 RV lifestyle cons

While the RV lifestyle can certainly be an exciting and fulfilling experience, it’s important to be aware of the RV living challenges that you may face along the way. From limited space and amenities to maintenance and budgeting many aspects of the RV lifestyle can be challenging to navigate.

This was a hard list to compile. Almost all of these RV lifestyle cons can be overcome. However some personality types don’t do well with new challenges and problems. There is a learning curve to the RV lifestyle.

So in this section, I’ll explore 23 common RV living challenges that people may encounter while living in an RV. I’ll also suggest how you can overcome them.

Whether you’re a seasoned RV enthusiast or a newcomer to the lifestyle these challenges are worth considering before hitting the road.

Longfellow-Evangeline State Historic Park, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

1. Limited space. RVs can be cramped and may not have as much storage or living space as a traditional home.

2. Hooking up utilities. Setting up and connecting utilities including water, electricity, and sewer can be challenging and time-consuming. Then there’s the unpleasant task of dumping the black tank.

3. Maintenance. RVs require regular maintenance such as checking and replacing fluids, cleaning and inspecting the exterior and interior, and performing routine upkeep. Things will break. When you are driving down the road, your RV is going through the equivalent of a 4.0 earthquake!

4. Driving and maneuvering. Operating an RV is more challenging than driving a car especially when it comes to parking, backing up, and navigating tight spaces. In heavy traffic or on congested city streets you will need to be extra alert and careful.

5. Weather and road conditions. RVs can be affected by adverse weather conditions and rough roads which can make traveling more difficult.

6. Finding campsites. It can be difficult to find campsites or RV parks that are suitable and available, especially during peak travel seasons.

7. Limited privacy. RVs often have thin walls and limited privacy which can be challenging for people who value their personal space. In campgrounds, your neighbors may be parked just 10 feet away!

8. Limited amenities. Some RV parks and campsites can be somewhat rundown and may not have all the amenities that a person is used to such as laundry facilities, dog runs, level spots, and reliable Wi-Fi.

9. Limited resources. Most RVs do not have the same resources as a traditional home such as a full-size fridge or freezer, an oven, or a dishwasher. Closet and storage space can be limited.

Elephant Butte State Park, New Mexico © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

10. Budgeting. The cost of purchasing, insuring, and maintaining an RV as well as paying for campsites and fuel can be expensive and requires careful budgeting. That old saying Count the cost before embarking on such a change in life is very true regarding finance.

11. Limited access to certain areas. Some roads and areas may be inaccessible to RVs due to their size or weight restrictions. You will want to carefully plan routes to be sure overpass and bridge clearances on secondary roads will safely let your RV pass beneath.

12. Limited socialization. The RV lifestyle can be isolating at times as people may not have the same opportunities to socialize or participate in community activities as they would in a traditional neighborhood. Each time you move camp and set up somewhere else you will have to adjust to a new community. If you are socially awkward, this can be a challenge.

13. Separation from family and friends.The RV lifestyle may involve spending long periods of time away from family and friends which can be challenging for people who value close relationships. You will need to find new ways to stay in touch like FaceTime or Zoom. You will want to plan for regular trips back home for in-person visits.

14. Limited access to healthcare. Some areas may not have adequate healthcare facilities or services which can be challenging for people who require regular medical care. Telemedicine for travelers can help a lot.

15. Limited internet and phone service. Some remote areas may not have reliable internet or phone service which can be a challenge for people who need to stay connected for work or personal reasons.

16. Limited access to groceries and other supplies. It can be difficult to find groceries and other supplies in some areas especially if you are traveling to remote or rural locations.

17. Limited access to entertainment. Depending on where you are traveling you may have limited access to entertainment options such as movie theaters, concerts, or sporting events.

18. Dealing with breakdowns and emergencies, RVs can and will break down and you will experience the same emergencies and other issues that happen in everyday life while you are on the road. Dealing with them in unfamiliar new locations can be stressful and costly.

19. Escalating fuel costs. This has become a major concern and a dealbreaker in recent months for many new fulltime RVers especially those on a fixed income.

20. Limited pet-friendly options. It can sometimes be difficult to find pet-friendly RV parks or campsites which can be a challenge for people who travel with pets.

21. Limited accessibility. Some RVs may not be accessible for people with disabilities or chronic medical conditions as they may not have features such as ramps or handrails.

22. Limited vehicle options. RVs come in various sizes and styles but some people may have difficulty finding an RV that meets their needs or preference.

23. Adjusting to a different way of life. The RV lifestyle is a significant change from living in a traditional home and it may take some time for people to adjust to a different way of living. This can be challenging for some people who are used to a certain routine or way of life.

Enchanted Rock State Natural Area in Central Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

There you have it—23 pros and 23 cons of the RV lifestyle!

Consider using these two lists as a checklist. Which of these is more important to you? Sort through them and find your own way of managing them.

Which of these would you rather spend $200 on?

Going on an all-day whale watching trip which includes sightings of multiple bears and cubs searching for eels along the beach, sightings of numerous humpback whales and porpoises, dozens of different species of sea birds, and the star of the show, the orcas, which are everywhere. All the while the captain is narrating a captivating story of the wildlife and the native cultures that are intrinsically woven around that wildlife. Oh yeah, and the trip includes lunch. 

OR 

Buying a new table lamp or wall hanging depicting sea life!

Where to next?

Explore Arizona with my RV adventure guide:

Worth Pondering…

If you wait for the perfect moment when all is safe and assured, it may never arrive. Mountains will not be climbed, races won, or lasting happiness achieved.

—Maurice Chevalier

RV Road Trip or Hotel Stay: Which is Better?

Here’s why an RV wins (almost) every time

As a longtime RVer and RV blogger, you may think I’m unfairly biased toward staying in an RV vs. a hotel. But, before you decide to devalue my opinion, let me share with you that I have also traveled to to numerous foreign vacation spots including Barbados and St. Lucia, Mexico and Peru, Tokyo and Hong Kong, United Kingdom and Portugal, London and Paris. I’ve also stayed in hotels at Chicago, Atlanta, San Antonio, Seattle, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Washington, DC.

So, believe me, I’m well-acquainted with both travel options. 

In my experienced opinion, staying in an RV wins (almost) every time. I will tell you the top reasons why and the exceptions when hotels win.

Camping at Padre Island National Seashore, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

10 reasons why an RV is better than a hotel stay

RVing is often cheaper, easier, and more comfortable than staying in a hotel. There are always exceptions, of course, which I’ll discuss at the end.

But first, let’s jump into the benefits of RV vs. a hotel stay.

1. Campgrounds and RV parks are cheaper

Campgrounds (especially at state and national parks) tend to be significantly cheaper than hotel rooms. A night at a state or national park usually runs $30-$50 whereas a nearby hotel to such natural attractions usually runs $150-$250 or more. 

Even private RV parks are usually significantly cheaper than hotels. This is especially true near major attractions, like theme parks or other busy destinations. 

Granted, some RV parks and RV resorts with high-end amenities can be about the same price. But campgrounds and RV parks are cheaper than hotels for the most part.

Boondocking along Utah Scenic Byway 24 © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

2. Boondocking is even cheaper (and often free)

Boondocking is a self-contained camping style that doesn’t require hookups. So, you can camp anywhere you’re allowed to park. 

When boondocking, you have numerous cheap or free camping options available to you.

Plus, you get to explore more secluded areas and be away from the sometimes noisy campgrounds and RV parks.

3. No living out of a suitcase

Not having to unpack, repack, and lug suitcases around is a big plus.

When you stay in an RV, you can neatly organize and KEEP your stuff in drawers and closet spaces. You don’t even have to repack for every road trip within the same season.

Camping with your dog © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

4. More pet-friendly

Taking your dog is a huge plus for many RVers. It’s hard to find pet-friendly hotels and vacation rentals which make pet lovers less interested in hotel stays.

You can stock your RV with dog camping accessories and enjoy all the perks of traveling with a dog.

This advantage of RVs over hotels is particularly beneficial to cat owners. While some hotels and vacation rentals do allow dogs, most do not allow cats! In an RV, you can get these purrrfect cat travel accessories and bring your kitty along for the trip.

5. Sleep in your own bed

Every new hotel you stay at has different bedding and pillows. There’s no guarantee of their quality and cleaniness or the quality of sleep you’ll get. When you RV, you take your bed and all your favorite linens wherever you go.

Eating at Boone Tavern Hotel, Berea, Kentucky © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

6. Save money with your own kitchen

One of the biggest expenses of staying in a hotel is not the cost of the hotel itself. Rather, it’s the cost of eating at restaurants.

Traveling with a stocked kitchen in your RV saves a lot of money. Your travel budget will stretch farther and you’ll get to travel longer.

You’re essentially eating the same as you would at home. So, you don’t have to figure food costs into your travel budget other than special restaurant stops and any excess beyond your home food budget.

Driving and hiking the Creole Nature Trail, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

7. More travel flexibility

RVers have the unique opportunity of adopting their own travel pace.

I like to think most travelers fall into one of three categories: the wanderers, the explorers, the bucket-listers.

First, we have wanderers. They’re slow-moving and thorough in the experience of a place, state, or region. When we’re not rushed for time, I find that my travel style naturally falls into this category. Wanderers enjoy spending anywhere from several days to multiple weeks in one spot (and even call the same locale home for a month or more). They’re generally intentional about building flexibility into their travel plans.

Next, we have explorers. Explorers are the travelers who aren’t on hard and fast timelines but also don’t stick around long enough for folks to start asking if they’re locals to the area. Explorers are either on the move (or planning to be) at least once a week. These travelers are driven by adventure and are firm believers in sticking to an itinerary and often have seasonal interests (such as leaf peeping) or hobbies like hiking or birding that help shape their travel schedules. They also tend to leave room in the schedule for the potential of sticking around for an extra day or even another week.

The last category of travelers is what I call bucket-listers. These are the folks who have a mission and a plan and rarely deviate from it. These folks may stay in one spot for a week or so at a time but not often. They’ve got a bunch of places to be and a whole lot of motivation to get there.

Camping at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Arizona/Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

8. No bed bugs

There’s been a lot of chatter about bed bugs in recent years and it’s more than just social media gossip. Bed bugs have been on the rise globally for the past decade. They are now found in every U.S. state with Washington DC, Baltimore, Chicago, and Los Angeles being the most plagued.

With an RV, you don’t have to worry about other people bringing bed bugs into your sleeping space. You can maintain a high standard of cleanliness and more easily avoid a bed bug infestation.

This is something to consider, as well, if deciding whether or not to rent out your RV.

Las Cruces (New Mexico) Farmers Market © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

9. Better entertainment

Staying in an RV is more enjoyable than a hotel. For one, you get to take your favorite entertainment with you without being limited to a suitcase. Instead of flipping through channels on a hotel TV or paying exorbitant fees for pay-per-view movies, you have your own TV, DVDs, etc. You can even have your own outdoor movie theater.

You can also easily bring varied entertainment with you such as board games, hobbies, and arts and crafts. And, you don’t have to fret over which books to lug around. There’s more room for your favorite books to read while camping. And many RV parks offer a book exchange.

And let’s not forget about sitting around the campfire or putting your stargazing kit to use! Both those activities sure beat sitting in a hotel room at night.

10. You meet more people (or avoid them entirely)

I know some people might consider being around more people a con rather than a pro. But meeting other travelers and learning about where they’re from and where they’re headed can add to your travel experience.

You don’t have to meet other people while camping, but if want to, then you easily can. Campers are, by and large, a friendly and helpful lot. You’ll have plenty of opportunities to make friends while camping if you so desire.

Check this out to learn more: 11 Ways RVing Beats Flying

However, the opposite can also be true. If you don’t want to be around other people then RVing is still the better option over a hotel. If you boondock, you can stay in remote locations where there are NO people. Just you and nature! You can’t get that at a hotel.

Corpus Christi, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The exceptions (when hotels are better than RVs)

There are, of course, exceptions to RVing being better than staying in an RV. In some cases, it is better to stay in a hotel than in an RV.

Let’s take a look at a few of those cases…

1. You’ve on a short timeline

It may be better to stay in a hotel if you’re traveling to a destination that’s far away for a short duration. Driving to a distant destination takes longer than flying, of course.

So, if you live in Idaho and want to go to Boston or San Antonio on your one-week vacation from work, you better fly.

Fly or RV to Boston © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

2. Your destination is far

If traveling far, fuel may cost more than airfare. At time of writing the national average price for a gallon of gas was $3.57 and diesel was $3.85 per gallon ($4.81 in California). If you drive a diesel pusher and get 10 mpg (which is generous) and you drive 300 miles in one day, that’s up to $144 a day.

The average domestic flight from a major airport is around $300. Depending on the number of plane tickets you need to buy, flying may be cheaper. Although, don’t forget to account for local transportation costs and additional fees.

Now, keep in mind, that the journey is usually as important to RVers as the destination. But if you drive straight through without enjoying sites along the way then flying is probably better especially if you don’t plan to stay long.

3. You don’t want to clean

Another exception is when you don’t feel up to doing cleaning and maintenance. Having maid service is certainly a big mark in favor of hotels. 

Sometimes, you can get really great deals on all-inclusive hotel resorts. This type of full-service can be comparable cost-wise to RV resorts with similar amenities. 

Fly or RV to Mobile, Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

4. You don’t want to risk breaking down

RVs run the risk of breaking down in the middle of a road trip. Granted, if you do preventative maintenance and check your tire pressure every travel day, you’re far less likely to encounter problems.

But RVs are vehicles and vehicles do break down. It’s a risk you have to be willing to take, a risk you can weigh based on the age of your RV, the age of your RV tires, and how well it’s been maintained.

5. You don’t want to set up camp

RVers have to setup and tear down camp which can be more work than some people are willing to do. Experienced RVers get it down to a science and can quickly do both.

But, if you’re new to RVing, it can take a couple of hours to set up and tear down. It can really eat into your fun time until you get the hang of it. Here are 11 tips for getting started.

It helps to use a departure and setup checklist.

There are other exceptions, of course, but the above tend to be the main reasons people opt for hotels over RVs. And some are hesitant to to make the leap into the unknown, a new and different lifestyle.

Worth Pondering…

No matter where we go in our motorhome, that sense of independence is satisfying. We have our own facilities, from comfortable bed to a fridge full of our favorite foods. We set the thermostat the way we like it and go to bed and get up in our usual routine.

UNWRITTEN Rules for Camping with a Dog

Everyone knows you need to pick up after your dog but do you know these UNWRITTEN rules of camping with a dog?

Are you planning to take your dog on your next camping trip? If so, read this first!

Taking your pets on adventures can be one of the greatest pleasures. But, when camping with your dog there are some UNWRITTEN rules that you will want to follow. 

The following outlines seven essential rules of camping with your dog to help keep them, you, and your camping neighbors happy.

While you love having your dog along for the ride with you, there can be a challenge to make RV life more pet friendly. Here are some tips that may help you along the way. Check out my other guides for traveling with pets:

Keeping your dog on a leash and picking up after them are right at the top of the written rules of campground policies. Of course, those are the two BIG rules everyone should follow.

But they’re not the only ones! The UNWRITTEN rules of camping with a dog are just as important. By abiding by them, you’ll be spared from unwanted complaints or annoyed neighbors. Besides, you don’t want to be a bad camping neighbor, to begin with.

By the way, I have a series of posts on UNWRITTEN rules of camping:

A fake dog doing its business © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

1. Walk them away from campsites to do their business

Even if you pick up after your dog, it’s bad etiquette to let them do their business on other people’s campsites. This is true whether they’re lifting their leg, squatting, or dumping their black tank.

Proper etiquette is to walk your dog away from others’ campsites and let them relieve themselves away from people’s belongings (including their RVs). Most campgrounds have trails, open grass areas, or even designated pet areas to use in such cases.

Dog on leash © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

2. Use biodegradable or composting dog poop bags

Campers love nature which means we also love protecting it. It’s best to use certified compostable dog poop bags or biodegradable bags. Be careful what you buy, though! Many brands claim to be biodegradable but don’t meet ASTM D6954-04 standards.

A campground pet parade © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

3. Don’t let them bark incessantly

Dogs bark—I get that. And most camping neighbors won’t even flinch if your dog barks every now and then. The problem is when your dog barks incessantly.

In many cases, the dog owners are blissfully unaffected since dogs usually bark more when their owners leave them unattended. It’s the neighbors that are subjected to the noise while the owners are away.

If your dog is a barker, then proper camping etiquette requires you to invest a bit of time and money in training and training products. You can almost immediately fix the problem by getting an affordable and humane bark collar for dogs. These training collars use vibrations and/or beeps to train your dog not to bark. In many cases, the beep alone works and eventually putting the collar alone on is reminder enough for the dog to stay quiet.

If you’re opposed to collars, you can learn how to teach your dog not to bark through one-on-one training. There are YouTube videos for that.

A campground pet parade © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

4. Keep your dog cool

Leaving your dog in a hot RV is no different than leaving them in a hot car. The inside temperature of a vehicle (including RVs) can get up to 45-50 degrees F hotter than the temperature outdoors.

If you leave your dog inside your vehicle or rig, ensure it is not hotter than 70 degrees F outside. Or ensure your rig’s interior temp doesn’t exceed 80 degrees. A favorite way to do that is to use Waggle Pet Safety Monitor.

I have heard of instances where camp hosts have had to break into RVs to get the dogs inside to safety.

Tip: If you are worried about a dog left in an RV, you should notify the campground host or the police. You should not break into the RV yourself as that exposes you to serious legal risk.

This rule also covers your dog being outside in extreme heat. Make sure your pup has access to plenty of water and shade. 

Traveling with a dog © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

5. Keep them tick-free

One of the biggest threats to your animals is some of the smallest and easily overlooked. They can also be a threat to you! I’m talking about ticks.

Lyme disease is no joke and is spread by ticks. Some milder symptoms of Lime Disease are fever, fatigue, headache, and a rash. 

But if left untreated, it can spread to your joints, heart, and nervous system. One of the worst effects causes people to be unable to think clearly for months after treatment. 

I have a few helpful articles on keeping your pet, your RV, and YOU tick-free:

6. Keep an eye on your dog (or hire someone to)

When traveling with your dog, you are bound to need to leave your rig at some point. But what do you do about your pup? 

You can buy excellent cameras that help you keep an eye on your dog when you are not around. One great option is the Furbo dog camera. Not only does it easily allow you to see what your dog is doing from your phone. It also helps keep your dog entertained by tossing treats when you tell it to!

Plus, it can alert you if your dog is barking. (Remember UNWRITTEN Rule #3)

When a camera doesn’t cut it, you can hire a pet sitter pretty much wherever you travel.

Dog on leash © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

7. Keep your dog under your control

Ensuring your dog stays under your control is for both your own safety and other’s enjoyment of the park. Having your dog under your control means your dog is unable to approach others, wander from your campsite or general area, bother wildlife, or be in a scenario where the dog may cause harm to property, people, or animals. 

Bring and use a compliant tie line, anchor, and leash for your dog.

Many parks and campgrounds ensure your dog remains under your control by listing a maximum leash or tie line length. Examples follow:

  • National parks maximum leash length: 6 feet
  • Wisconsin State Parks maximum leash length: 8 feet
  • Michigan State Parks maximum leash length: 6 feet
  • KOA (Kampgrounds of America) maximum leash length: 6 feet
A campground pet parade © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

8. Keep your dog secure on your campsite

Whenever you leave your dog alone at the campsite, they need to be secured in your RV. But when you’re present, it’s nice to give them a secure area to roam or play.

One fantastic device is an invisible fence. This is a way to allow your dog to roam freely and explore in a specific, designated area that you choose. This is an excellent option for boondockers or people who camp in more wide-open areas. 

There are also portable fence options like the FXW Aster Dog Playpen and IRIS USA Dog Playpen. These fences are great for standard campsites (at campgrounds where dog fences are allowed).

Looking for a way to keep your dog on your property without using a physical fence? Check out SpotOn GPS Dog Fence. Spoton works almost anywhere but you need a lot that’s at least ½ acre. Why? Because you’ll need to allow for the fence alert/warning zone. The effective boundary for your dog is 10 feet inside the fence boundary that you walk. Walk your planned boundary with SpotOn’s dog collar and your phone or draw your fence in the app. True Location™ technology builds on conventional GPS and makes it better, giving you the most reliable fence boundary that never requires calibration. So your dog can have a great adventure without risking a great escape. Get professionally-developed training programs that’ll have your dog using SpotOn in a few simple steps!

Some RVers travel with a cat © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What about traveling with cats?

Dogs are not always your best friend. Sometimes it’s your cat!

And no matter what species your furry best friend is, you should be able to take him or her along with you on your next road trip.

Traveling with a cat comes with some added challenges but it’s nothing you can’t handle especially if you’re prepared with the right cat travel accessories.

Worth Pondering…

A dog reflects the family life. Whoever saw a frisky dog in a gloomy family, or a sad dog in a happy one? Snarling people have snarling dogs, dangerous people have dangerous ones.

―Arthur Conan Doyle, The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes

Camping Travel Tips for Pet Owners

Whether you’ll be camping with your pet for the first time or just need a reminder, this article may provide some helpful hints for you

Planning to take your pet camping with you this summer?

Then you are in good company.

Traveling with your pet © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

More and more campers and RVers are traveling with their pets and finding it makes camping even more enjoyable. Camping and pets are, in most cases, a good mix.

According to the Recreation Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA), more than 50 percent of RV travelers bring pets on their travels. Among these pet owners, 78 percent bring dogs, 15 percent travel with cats, and the remaining pet owners travel with birds or other small pets.

Pet parade in an RV park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

And in the travel industry at large, more and more families are traveling with their pets and experts say pet travel is fast becoming a multi-billion dollar industry due to the popular trend.

Traveling with your pet can be rewarding for you and your family’s pet but the key to a successful camping trip or any mode of vacation travel is advanced planning and preparation, common sense, and sometimes a dose of creativity. Only friendly, non-aggressive dogs should be brought to campgrounds.

A cat on a mission in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The most important thing to remember before making plans is to make sure your pet is healthy enough to travel. A pre-vacation check-up with your veterinarian is just what the doctor ordered to make sure Fido or Fluffy is up to snuff and ready to hit the road. Make sure your pet is up to date on all shots and bring copies of vaccination records with you, as you never know when you might need them.

Some RV parks offer dog-washing stations © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

When packing for pets, it’s important to remember food and water dishes, an extra collar and leash, licenses, medicines or supplements, brushes, tie-outs, shampoo, and something familiar from home like a toy or blanket. If a dog is comfortable sleeping in a crate at home, that should be brought along too. Consider giving your pet bottled water for continued consistency.

Ensure your pet is properly identified. Also, obtain identification with the address of your destination. Carry a photo of your pet. You’ll be glad you did if you find yourself in the unfortunate position of making, photocopying, and posting “lost pet” notices.

Pet parade in an RV park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Bring along your pet’s bed and favorite toys so it will feel comfortable and at home on the road. If traveling with a feline friend, think through the cat-box arrangement. Having extra litter, a covered litter box, plastic bags for disposal, a scoop, and baking soda to cover the bottom of the box will keep mess and odor to a minimum.

Your dog feels as cramped as you do after hours of traveling. You must walk your canine pet when you take rest stops. If your pet is a cat, walks aren’t an issue, but plenty of stretching room is.

Pet-washing station at Tucson/Lazydays KOA © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

To make camping with your pet an exciting experience for the both of you, be sure to research the campsite ahead of time, take note of any restrictions or regulations, and bring the essentials along with you.

When registering at a campground or RV park check the location of the nearest veterinary doctor or clinic and how to get there. After settling into a camp or RV site with pets, it is important to be a responsible camper and pet owner. This includes cleaning up after pets, keeping them leashed, and making sure they stay out of prohibited areas.

Looking for your pet cat? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The most important thing to remember is they are your pets and you must make some changes to your RVing lifestyle to ensure their comfort. They may have an accident in the RV and you need to accept that. They may require medical attention that could extend a stay when you are traveling. You need to be flexible in your plans to accommodate pets when you decide to bring them along on your travels and camping trips.

If you plan and are prepared, camping can be a rewarding, memorable experience for both owners and pets.

Worth Pondering…

A dog reflects the family life. Whoever saw a frisky dog in a gloomy family, or a sad dog in a happy one? Snarling people have snarling dogs, dangerous people have dangerous ones.

―Arthur Conan Doyle, The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes

12 Unspoken Etiquette Rules of RV Camping

Are you practicing good RV campground etiquette?

RV camping in the great outdoors is a great way to spend time with your family. Whether you are in a fifth-wheel, travel trailer, or motorhome, knowing these unspoken etiquette rules of RV camping will make your next adventure go smoothly for your family and your campground neighbors.

RV camping at Buckhorn Lake RV Resort, Kerrville, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Be a good neighbor

Whether camping in an RV or tent, being a good neighbor will set the tone for your stay. Following the rules of campground, etiquette is an easy way to ensure that everyone can camp together in harmony.

RV camping at Whispering Hills RV Park, Georgetown, Kentucky © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Know the rules

RV parks and campgrounds have rules for everyone’s comfort. Some RV resorts have more rules than others. Upon check-in, your host will go over those rules or hand them to you to read.

RV camping at Windcreek Casino RV Park, Atmore, Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Don’t cut through other campsites

Everyone pays for a designated site to park their RV. Respect your neighbor’s space by not walking through their campsite.

Keep it quiet

Most campgrounds have designated quiet hours. These hours take effect typically around 10 p.m. to 8 a.m. Be respectful and turn down your music and keep noise at a minimum. If you are getting to your campsite after hours, do the minimum to set up. You can always finish setting up in the morning.

RV camping at Lakeside RV Park, Livingston, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Don’t overflow

Be respectful of each other’s space by not overflowing your own RV camping site and into your neighbors. If you bring a bunch of gear, like bikes, chairs, and outdoor games, make sure it fits inside your site.

Keep it clean

No one likes a dirty site. The campground caretakers do their best to clean up before you check-in, but sometimes there’s trash left on the ground or in the fire pit. Follow the old camping adage of “leave no trace” and double-check that all your trash is picked up before you pull out.

RV camping at Cochise Terrace RV Park, Benson, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Hook it up correctly

Full hook-up sites have sewer, water, and electric connections. If you are using the sewer and water hookups, make sure that you are using the ports designated for your site and that your hoses are in good repair. A leaking sewer hose is unpleasant and unsanitary.

RV camping at Tom Sawyer RV Park, West Memphis, Arkansas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Keep track of your kids

Most RV campgrounds are family-friendly and, yes, kids deserve to have fun too. However, the fun shouldn’t be at the expense of the neighbors in your campground. Make sure they’re supervised when roaming about and know the campground rules.

RV camping at Hilltop RV Park, Fort Stockton, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Leash your pets

Many RV campgrounds are pet-friendly, but you’ll want to double-check the pet policy before you arrive. Most campgrounds require that your pets be leashed and under your control, both for the safety of your pet and other campers. Many RV campgrounds require that the leash is no more than six feet long and that your pet is secured when not leashed (like in a crate or pen).

RV camping at Smokian RV Park, Soap Lake, Washington © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Don’t leave a barking dog

Dogs bark—that’s just a fact. However, not everyone is a dog lover. Being in a new area can be an adjustment for your pets due to new people and changing surroundings. Try to teach your pet how to behave around the campsite. If you have a dog that barks non-stop when left alone, consider taking him or her with you on hikes, or don’t bring them on your RV trip.

Worth Pondering…

Cherish yesterday, dream tomorrow, live today.

Tips for Walking Your Dog When Camping

Seven tips for walking your dog when traveling in your RV

Like their human counterparts, dogs are eager to explore their new surroundings at pit stops along your travel route and once the RV has reached its destination.

But before putting the leash on your four-legged friend to explore the area or hit the trail, consider the following seven tips:

RV park pet parade © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Plan Pit Stops along Your Travel Route: You will need to stop for bathroom breaks as often as you would let them out at home, so don’t expect to cruise down the highway for hours and hours; make sure to plan adequate pit stops along the way.

RV park pet parade © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Adequate exercise is essential when traveling with dogs. Not only does exercise keep them healthy, it prevents bad behavior stemming from boredom or anxiety. Plan for at least an hour pit stop for each day of driving so that your dog can let off some energy.

RV park pet parade © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The Right Leash For Dog Walking: Prior to taking the first steps on the walk, make sure you’re using the proper leash. Retractable leashes are great for expansive areas with lots of room to explore. However, if you’re setting out on a narrow trail with deep underbrush and heavy foot and bicycle traffic, you’ll need to be able to keep your dog from wandering into danger. In that case, keep your dog on the proverbial “short leash.”

RV park pet parade © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Dog Walking Location, Location, Location: Be aware of the hazards and distractions that might stimulate your dog during the walk. Does your pooch dart after other dogs or people? If the answer is “yes,” try to avoid walking during high-traffic periods.

You might also scout out a less-busy walking area. If your dog’s unruly walking behavior is a problem, consider training options.

Guard dog at Hilltop RV park, Fort Stockton, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Walk Your Dog This Way: Always avoid allowing your dog to poke its snout into underbrush or exposed crevices under rocks; these habitats are homes to skunks, rattlesnakes, and other dangerous critters.

At the same time, avoid letting your dog get deep into the shrubbery or tall grass. During tick season, these little parasites like to perch at the ends of branches, just waiting for a free ride on your pet. Also, make sure your dog doesn’t venture into another RVer’s campsite. Not everybody loves dogs as much as you do!

RV park pet parade © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Man-made Dog Walking Hazards: Be careful when walking your dog on lawns. Pesticides and fertilizers can be toxic to dogs. Also, exercise caution around flowers. Some dogs have an appetite for tulips and other pretty blossoms that might be planted throughout the RV park—these can cause stomach problems for canines.

Guard dog at Hilltop RV park, Fort Stockton, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What to Bring When Dog Walking: Regardless of the length of your walk, you should always pack plastic bags for waste—you never know when nature will call.

Water is another essential—even on relatively short hikes, dogs can become dehydrated. Portable water bowls will make drinking convenient for your pooch.

Last but not least, don’t forget dog treats—these will come in handy when you want to reinforce good behavior.

RV park pet parade © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Train to Win At Dog Walking: Consider enrolling your dog in a training class before hitting the trail. Training will address problems your dog might have when it comes to dealing with other dogs, strangers, and wildlife. A well-trained dog means a happy human, and that will go a long way toward making your walk much more pleasurable.

Dog washing station at River Plantation RV Park, Seviereville, Tennessee © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

More RV parks than ever are laying out the welcome mat for pets. Creating a safe, nurturing environment inside your home-on-wheels ensures that everyone stays happy no matter where the road takes leads.

If you plan ahead and are prepared, camping can be a rewarding, memorable experience for both owners and pets.

Worth Pondering…

If animals could speak, the dog would be a blundering outspoken fellow; but the cat would have the rare grace of never saying a word too much.

―Mark Twain

How to Choose the Perfect RV Park and Campsite?

A guide to finding the perfect RV campsite

Are you a boater enthusiast and swimmer looking for a lakeside or oceanfront RV park? Prefer wide open spaces in the great outdoors with plenty of hiking trails? When deciding where to stay, whether for the night, the weekend, or the season, there are several things to consider.

Bella Terra of Gulf Shores, Foley. Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Find the Right Site

Many RVers spend a lot of time searching for the perfect RV park while overlooking the fact that finding the perfect campsite can be just as important. Terrain, location, amenities, water sources, and traffic patterns—just to name a few—play a big part in selecting the perfect spot. Here are a few strategies to help you find the right site.

Vista del Sol RV Resort, Bullhead City, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Questions to ask:

  • What’s your budget? Having a clear budget will help you make your decision when looking at various campgrounds and resorts.
  • Are you staying in an RV? Is everyone in your group staying in an RV, or will some prefer tent or cabin?
  • What is your length of stay? Is this an overnight stop, several days, or a longer stay?
  • What is your camping style? Do you prefer numerous amenities or low-impact camping?
Palm Canyon Campground, Anza Borrego Desert State Park, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Campgrounds are generally your most basic setup and are usually publicly owned and found in national, state, and county/regional parks. They tend to be more rustic, have ample room for tent camping, and cater to more outdoorsy types. They usually have greater emphasis on nature and scenic views than amenities and typical stays are shorter. It’s hit or miss as to the number of campgrounds that can accommodate big rigs so check the website or call the campground directly.

Cajun Palms RV Resort, Henderson, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

RV parks and resorts offer amenities and creature comforts, typically with full service sites. They are usually privately owned and offer both short and longer term stays. Most RV parks offer Wi-Fi, laundry facilities, showers, and dog parks.

Sea Breeze RV Park, Portland, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

RV resorts will be well manicured and in good condition. The roads in the park should be wide enough to allow RVs of all sizes to enter and leave sites easily. Some RV resorts are gated with manned gate houses and you might find that your RV must be of a certain caliber in order to gain entry.  There is no industry standard; you may notice more luxurious amenities and surroundings according to price. These amenities may include exercise rooms, Jacuzzis, lap pools, in-house restaurants and/or bars, or golf courses.

Columbia Riverfront RV Park, Woodland, Washington © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Is your campsite spacious enough for a comfortably stay? Is there room to extend slide-outs?

Is there enough space to back in your rig? Do you require a pull-through site?

Are you bringing your pet? Does the campground provide pet-friendly amenities?

Do you want to a park with a bustling social scene or are you seeking solitude?

Meaher State Park, Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Planning

Take the time to research not only the campground or RV resort but your route, when you’ll be arriving, and any current restrictions related to COVID-19 or weather. And with today’s travel challenges, it’s even more important than ever to stay safe and be prepared. The RV park website is a great place to start. Supplement this with online reviews and personal recommendations.

Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

And when you do call for reservations, be sure to give them a detailed description of your RV (length, height, toad) and what your requirements are in the way of hook-ups and additional services.

Pala Casino RV Park, Pala, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Make a reservation

Demand for RVs in the era of COVID-19 has surged across the country. Many Americans are skipping hotels and air travel for RV parks in this era of social distancing with the industry scrambling to keep up with the demand. With an increasing scarcity of available sites it is advisable to book a site well in advance. This maximizes the likelihood of securing your top choice site. Phone the park to make a reservation. Reserving online isn’t always a possibility. You’re also more likely to snag a great spot if you’re more flexible with your dates. Popular destinations occasionally have campsites available mid-week.

Golden Palms Village RV Park, Hemet, California © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Pro tip

Discounts are typically given for longer stays. Are you able to escape for a week or even a month? Ask about specials and you’ll likely receive a lower price per night.

Creek Fire RV Resort, Savannah, Georgia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Many RV parks post their campground maps online. You can even check out the satellite view on Google Earth for a bird’s-eye view of the campground.

If you’re traveling with children, you might prefer a spot near the pool or playground.

River Plantation RV Park, Seviereille, Tennessee © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

When selecting the right campsite, you may face a trade-off and need to prioritize which factors are most important to you.

Worth Pondering…

It is what we think we know already that often prevents us from learning.

—Claude Bernard

Vacationing by RV this Summer? Here’s what you need to Know

Parks, scenic drives, and hiking trails all wait—all on your own terms

The wide open spaces never seemed more inviting than now. Fresh air, gorgeous scenery, and a healthy dose of freedom—it’s all waiting for you along the highways and byways of America. If you’re ready for a getaway with both wide-open spaces and a lot of autonomy, consider an RV road trip around America.

Motor coaches along Utah Scenic Byway 12 © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

When you’re in your RV, or camping, you’re in control of your environment. You can spend as much or as little time as you want in any one place. You can go off on a hike all day and come back and never see a soul. Such trips literally and figuratively “put you in the driver’s seat”.

Camping at Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

As communities re-open after their COVID-19-related closures, keep in mind that some parks, businesses, and attractions may still be closed or have new protocols in place. Before traveling, familiarize yourself with local guidelines and regulations for the destinations you plan to visit.

Camping in a Class B motorhome at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Pick Your Wheels

There are vehicles for every style of trip from the converted minivan–style Jucy vans that sleep four and have a kitchen to full-size RVs with a bathroom. If you’re new to RVing, start by getting acquainted with the various types of RVs available. Options range from pop-up, teardrop, travel, and fifth-wheel trailers to motorized RVs that range in size from vans (Class B motorhomes) and cab-over morothomes (Class C) to long, bus-style motor coaches.

Camping in a travel trailer at Whispering Hills RV Park near Georgetown, Kentucky © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Rent or buy something that works best work for you and your family. Think about the activities you plan to do. If your plans involve regularly traversing hairpin mountain passes or embarking on day-long hikes, a campervan or truck camper would best fit the bill. Conversely, 45-foot motor homes equipped with cooking appliances and large wastewater holding tanks work well for large family get-togethers or cross-country trips.

Camping at Bellingham RV Park, Washington © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Choose a vehicle that’s compatible with the area you plan to explore and within your budget. You’ll love having the extra space of a motorized RV if you’re exploring the desert or mostly traveling along major highways. That said, a smaller camper van might be better suited for the scenic drive along California Highway 1, Beartooth Highway to Yellowstone, and other winding roadways.  

Camping at Colorado River Thousand Trails Preserve near Columbus, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Most rentals do not require a special driver’s license. Ahead of booking make sure to ask about rental insurance and roadside assistance plans. Take advantage of a quick RV training session before revving up. If you plan on bringing along a furry friend, check the pet policies specific to your rental. Perhaps most important is to book early.

On the road to Natural Bridges National Monument, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Choose Your Scenery

There are hundreds—if not thousands—of amazing places to visit across the country. Do you want to do a coastal or mountain drive or go off the grid for a bit? State highways and county roads tend to feature scenic drives filled with more beauty than interstates, so stop and take some photos, smell the flowers, or just marvel at nature when venturing off the beaten path. Taking the scenic route can reveal some unexpected locally owned gems that get overlooked. Pecan pralines in Louisiana, BBQ in Texas, green chile cheeseburger in New Mexico.

Blue Ridge Parkway © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Want the journey to be just as meaningful as the destination? Check out these scenic byways. Looking to do an epic cross-country road trip along a beloved American roadway? Check out our guides to Route 66, Gold Rush Trail, or the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Fort Davis National Historic Site, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Maybe you’re a history buff or a foodie? You could plan your camping trip around either of those themes—and many more, to boot. Here are some of our best road trip ideas for patriots, wildlife lovers, and haunted house enthusiasts.

Jekyll Island, Georgia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

California dreaming? Got Georgia on your mind? No matter what part of the country, there’s a road that can take you there—so go for it. And be sure to stop at neat little towns and roadside attractions along the way.

Camping at Meaher State Park, Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Start Browsing Campgrounds to Create Your Itinerary

Almost any destination can be made better—or significantly worse—by choice of campground. It’s hard to relax if you don’t have access to clean showers or if your neighbors keep you up all night with noise.

Camping at Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Finally, don’t forget that we’re a great resource! Whether you’re camping out at a national park or just looking for the best RV park near your chosen national park, always turn to RVing with Rex for quality content to help you make your vacation great.

Worth Pondering…

Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out going to the mountains is going home; that wilderness is a necessity…

— John Muir

10 Luxurious RV Resorts for Summer Travel

While the coronavirus has prompted many to cancel their travel plans, some families are turning to RVs to travel safely this summer

Many RV resorts around the country are destinations unto themselves offering numerous amenities and activities that appeal to adults, children, and four-legged friends alike. Whether they have amazing sports facilities, on-site spas, casinos, or even a swim-up bar, these RV parks offer fantastic amenities.

While traveling by RV is low risk because it’s self-contained and you’re exposing yourself to fewer people, the risk does increase when you go to a resort. It is important to adhere to local guidelines when traveling and to check with the resort to see what will be closed for safety. 

Here are the top 10 luxury RV parks you should visit to this summer

Jackson Rancheria RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Jackson Rancheria RV Resort, Jackson, California

New in 2008, Jackson Rancheria RV Resort is part of a casino complex. Big rig friendly 50/30-amp electric service, water, sewer, and cable TV are centrally located. Wide, paved interior roads with wide concrete sites. Back-in sites over 55 feet with pull-through sites in the 70-75 foot range. We would return in a heartbeat. Reservations over a weekend are required well in advance. Jackson Rancheria is conveniently located in the heart of Gold Country.

Bella Terra RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Bella Terra RV Resort, Foley, Alabama

Expect to find an upscale Class A motorhome ownership resort. Daily, weekly, and monthly stays welcome. Lot sizes range from 3,500 to 4,500 square feet with paved pads approximately 16 feet x 75 feet and a paved patio. Select from pull-in, pull-through, or back-in sites. Paved streets. Cable TV, Wi-Fi, telephone, and 200 amp service capability.

Bella Terra RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Once settled in, consider the “Grand” clubhouse and zero entry infinity pool with Jacuzzi and dry sauna and various patios overlooking the lake. Inside you will discover the great room with large screen TV, movie theater room, fitness center, dry sauna, pedicure/massage room, and lounge/bar area. Other amenities include a fenced-in dog park.

Two Rivers Landing RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Two Rivers Landing RV Resort, Sevierville, Tennessee

Two Rivers Landing is a luxury RV Resort nestled along the banks of the beautiful French Broad River. A 5-star resort with 25 river front (drive-in sites) and 30 river view (back-in sites), Two Rivers Landing offers 30/50-amp electric service, water, sewer, and cable TV (65 channels) conveniently located centrally. Interior roads are paved; individual sites are concrete, 70 feet in length and 22 feet wide. All sites surrounded by beautiful landscaping. Our drive-in site faced the river. Wi-Fi worked well. A beautiful sunset looking out our front window. This is resort living at its best.

Durango RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Durango RV Resort, Red Bluff, California

Big-rig friendly, Durango is located on the Sacramento River. Most sites are pull-through, 70-90 feet in length, and 30-35 feet wide. In addition there are 11 riverfront sites and 21 water-feature spaces (fountains); these sites have utilities on both sides of the concrete pads enabling fifth wheels and travel trailer to back onto the sites and motorhomes to drive forward maximizing the view and water features. In addition, there are a number of buddy sites.

Buckhorn Lake RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Buckhorn Lake RV Resort, Kerrville, Texas

This upscale resort makes for a perfect home base to explore the Texas Hill Country. All sites are paved, have a paved patio and offer satellite TV, Wi-Fi, and instant-on phone. Relax around the two heated swimming pools/spas. Tennis courts. Adult fitness center overlooking the creek. While staying in the park, make it a point to see the “Club” section, a unique approach to the RV lifestyle. You’ll definitely want to make this resort a repeat stop on your RVing agenda.

Cajun Palms RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Cajun Palms RV Resort, Henderson, Louisiana

New in 2009 with paved streets, Cajun Palms offers long pull-through sites that range in length from 55 to 75 feet. Not to be ignored are the back-ins to the lake in the 55-60 foot range. Pull through and back-in sites have 20 feet of space between each concrete pad.

Cajun Palms RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

A full service resort, Cajun Palms features numerous traditional as well as high tech amenities. Accommodations consist of over 300 deluxe RV sites and 25 cabins. RV sites have full hookups, 30- and 50-amp, 70+ channels of digital cable, and on-site water and sewer. Easy-on, easy off Interstate 10 (Exit 115) at Henderson (near Breaux Bridge).

Columbia Sun RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Columbia Sun RV Resort, Kennewick, Washington

Big-rig friendly, Columbia Sun RV Resort is a new 5-star resort that opened in 2013. Spacious sites, manicured grass on both sides, wide paved streets, and a perfect 10/10*/10 Good Sam rating. Washington’s’s Tri-Cities area—Kennewick, Pasco, and Richland—is a great area to visit to explore the outdoors while still being close to shopping, dining, and wineries. The Columbia Sun Resort has a heated swimming pool, hot tub, fitness room, game room, dog runs, sports court, and a playground.

Ambassador RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Ambassador RV Resort, Caldwell, Idaho

Ambassador RV Resort is a 5-star resort that is easy-on, easy off (I-84 at Exit 29) with 188 full-service sites, pool, spa, sauna, and 5,000 square foot recreation hall. Features 30-foot x 85-foot short term pull-through sites, 35-foot x 75-foot long term pull through sites, 45-foot x 60-foot back-in sites, and wide-paved streets. Pets are welcome if friendly and owner is well trained.

Reunion Lake RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Reunion Lake RV Resort, Ponchatoula, Louisiana

Reunion Lake RV Resort is a gated resort with top-rated facilities and service and all-concrete roadways. Built around a scenic lake the park offers an adult pool with swim-up bar, poolside cabanas, a lazy river with tiki bar, giant hot tub, fitness center, family pool, basketball and pickleball courts, fenced-in dog park. Our Premium pull-through site will accommodate any size rig.

Vista del Sol RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Vista Del Sol RV Resort, Bullhead City, Arizona

This area has needed a new 5-star RV resort and in November 2015 a new Roberts resort opened with paved streets. The 88 wide concrete sites are terraced both back-ins and pull-in in the 65 foot range with paved sites and patios. One of 14 pull-in sites, our site (#6) faced to the west northwest with views of the hills and mountains as well as Bullhead City, Laughlin, and the Colorado River.

Vista del Sol RV Resort © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

50/30/20-amp electric service, water, sewer, and cable TV are conveniently located. Resort services include Wi-Fi, two pools, one spa, fitness room, billiards/game room, daily activities, Doggie Park, gated entry, and clubhouse with commercial kitchen and serving area for groups. Within this gated 55+ community one can also purchase a 400 sq. ft. model home or a manufactured home in varied sizes.

RVing with Rex selected this list of 5 star RV resorts from parks personally visited.

Worth Pondering…

Quality is never an accident; it is always the result of intelligent effort.

—John Ruskin

3 Tips for Pet-Friendly RV Travel

One of the primary benefits of RV travel is that your pets can enjoy the great outdoors all day and always sleep in the same space at night

More and more RVers are traveling with their beloved pets and finding it makes the experience even more enjoyable. RV travel and pets are, in most cases, a good mix.

More RVers are traveling with their pets © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

RV travel with your pets can be rewarding for you and your family’s pet but the key to a successful camping trip or any mode of vacation travel is advanced planning and preparation, common sense, and sometimes a dose of creativity.

Most dogs and cats can adapt to the RVing lifestyle by following these three tips for a pet-friendly RV travel.

More RVers are traveling with their pets © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Make the RV Their Home Too

When you travel without your favorite pillow, don’t you feel just a little lost at night? Cats and dogs also feel the same way when they go places without their familiar stuff. Animals rely so much more on their sense of smell than we do so when they go to places that lack odors from their most familiar objects, their world becomes confusing.

More RVers are traveling with their pets © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

You can help your pet adapt to your home on wheels in several ways:

Spend quality time together inside the RV during the days leading up to your departure

More RVers are traveling with their pets © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Take along their favorite bedding, toys, and even a rug

Create a pleasant environment with their favorite treats

Practice leaving your pet alone inside the RV well in advance of your departure gradually increasing length of time

Some RV parks host pet parades © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

If your dog is crate trained, use it―if not, consider using a baby gate to keep your dog confined to a small interior area

Keep the Routine

As humans, we love the refreshing routine change that RV vacations bring into our life, but it can cause confusion for pets. Minimize their mental chaos by sticking to daily routines during RV travel.

Some RV parks host pet parades © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Sleeping in is nice, but your pets will thank you when you awake as close to your usual hour as possible.

Keep morning rituals the same: walk, potty, eat breakfast.

Stick to their usual eating pattern.

Some RV parks host pet parades © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Take your dog on that last potty walk of the day at the usual bedtime.

When traveling cross-country and switching time zones, sticking to pet care routines is even more important. In his blog post about helping pets adjust to time changes, Dr. Ernie Ward says “For most pets, these changes are abrupt, unexpected, and challenging. They may ponder, ‘Why am I eating now? Why do I have to get up so early?’”

Some RV parks host pet parades © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Wherever you go, RV parks will expect your dog to be on a leash at all times. If your dog isn’t used to eliminating on-leash, you’ll need to train him how to do so long before your departure date.

Some RV parks host pet parades © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Be Prepared

Nobody expects to get sick or injured while traveling, but things do happen. Be prepared for pet-related emergencies.

Some RV parks host pet parades © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Always travel with a digital or paper copy of your pet’s most important medical records, including vaccination history and contact information for your veterinary clinic. A good working relationship between a pet owner and their veterinarian is the best bet to ensure the overall health of any animal.

Carry a Pet First Aid Kit; don’t rely on ones made for humans. There are numerous pre-packaged first aid kits that you can buy online or at sporting stores.

Some RV parks host pet parades © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Alternatively, ask your veterinarian to help you build a good kit. Your vet knows the specific needs of your pet and can help you find items to include in your kit specifically for your dog or cat, and the RV activities you are planning.

Some RV parks host pet parades © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

If your pet is on a prescription be sure to pack an adequate supply for the entire journey. Backup medicines for fleas, worms, and other common illnesses are also recommended.

Some RV parks offer dog wash stations © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

More RV parks than ever are laying out the welcome mat for pets. Creating a safe, nurturing environment inside your home-on-wheels ensures that everyone stays happy no matter where the road takes leads.

Even toy dogs do their thing © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Worth Pondering…

If animals could speak, the dog would be a blundering outspoken fellow; but the cat would have the rare grace of never saying a word too much.
―Mark Twain