11 Best Things to do this Summer in Georgia

Road trips to water parks, quirky landmarks, drive-in movies and many more of the hottest ways to explore Georgia this summer

Summertime in the Peach State is unlike anywhere else. Sure, it can be hot but there are plenty of ways to cool down. No matter what part of Georgia you’ll be visiting, you’re sure to have a great time. I have a few suggestions to add to your list.

1. Cool off in the water

What better way to beat the summer heat than by wading into the ocean, jumping in a lake, playing at one of Georgia’s water parks, or taking a dip in an RV park’s swimming pool?

Jekyll Island © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The Georgia Coast

Kayak around a historic lighthouse at Tybee Island, photograph Driftwood Beach on Jekyll Island, explore historic Sapelo Island, and much more on the Georgia Coast.

Margaritaville at Lanier Islands

The water park at Margaritaville at Lanier Islands opens every May as another way to enjoy the lake with mat racing slides, a zipline, and water activities for little ones.

Georgia’s Lake Country

Head to Lake Oconee and Lake Sinclair for watersports, fishing, golf, and cool morning breezes. You’ll love all of the water activities as well as great dining, shopping, and nearby sightseeing in Eatonton, Greensboro, Madison, and Milledgeville.

Cumberland Island National Seashore © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Six Flags White Water

Six Flags White Water in Marietta is a longtime favorite with nearly 70 acres of slides, tube rides, and a wave pool.

SoakYa Water Park at Lake Winnepesaukah

At Lake Winnepesaukah Amusement Park and SoakYa Water Park in Rossville, swimmers can relax at the beach lagoon, race on the slides, and splash in the interactive kids’ area.

Spivey Splash at Clayton County International Park

Cruise along the state’s largest lazy river at Spivey Splash waterpark at the Clayton County International Park in Jonesboro. Kids will love cooling off on the splash pad, flow rider, water slides and pool, and testing their skills on the ropes course.

Splash in the Boro

At Splash in the Boro Family Water Park in Statesboro, swimmers can float on the lazy river, brave the water slides, and bob in the wave pool.

Summer Waves Water Park

On Jekyll Island, swimmers can take a break from the beach at Summer Waves Water Park to brave the Pirates Passage flume, drift down Turtle Creek, and wade into the kiddie pool.

Camping at Jekyll Island Campground © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

2. Camping

Georgia is an ideal playground for those who like a variety of camping adventures. Georgia’s state park system allows you to enjoy a variety of camping experiences across the state and many other campgrounds and attractions offer inviting settings for sleeping under the stars.

Park your RV or set up your tent at campsites in the North Georgia mountains to explore miles of hiking and biking trails, waterfalls, scenic overlooks, and undisturbed forests. Or go camping on the Georgia coast near beaches, boating, fishing, and more water activities. Throughout the state, rolling hills, lakes, and rivers offer the perfect conditions for camping trips filled with fun.

Stephen C. Foster State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Stephen C. Foster State Park

The Okefenokee Swamp is the backdrop for a unique camping experience among the swampy lowlands and wildlife of southern Georgia at Stephen C. Foster State Park near Fargo. A certified dark sky park by the International Dark Sky Association, this park has minimal light pollution so guests can experience some of the darkest skies in the Southeast. Stand beneath a sky full of stars and see the Milky Way stretched out above you.

Vogel State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Vogel State Park

Camp along Wolf Creek and enjoy the babble of tumbling waters lulling you to sleep at night after exploring North Georgia’s beloved mountain playground at Vogel State Park near Blairsville. With 34 cottages; 90 tents, trailer, and RV campsites; and primitive backpacking sites, visitors have a range of overnight accommodations. Swim, boat, and fish in Lake Trahlyta and explore hiking trails to waterfalls, playing miniature golf, and stepping back into history at the Civilian Conservation Corps museum.

Soar through the trees © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

3. Soar through the trees

Feeling adventurous? Georgia has a number of thrilling ziplines for all experience levels.

Banning Mills Screaming Eagle canopy tours has the largest, continuous zip line canopy tour in the world.

In Columbus, you can zip from Georgia to Alabama with Blue Heron Zipline Adventure Park.

Zipline Canopy Tours of Blue Ridge soar above North Georgia with two towers and three sky bridges.

Farmers market © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

4. Hit up the farmers markets

Take advantage of the state’s agricultural bounty by visiting one of the many Georgia Grown farmers markets, like Dublin’s Market on Madison, the Atlanta State Farmers Market, Oconee Farmers Market, and the Cordele State Farmers Market, the major watermelon distribution hub for the Southeast. They’re easy to find in nearly every region. You’ll find fresh produce, meats, seafood, prepared foods, and crafts. It’s a great way to pick up ingredients to cook for friends and family. The Georgia Department of Agriculture is a good place to start looking.

5. Plan a road trip to see quirky landmarks

Georgia has some truly unique attractions that are worth a road trip in their own right. There are quirky artist havens like Pasaquan in Buena Vista and Summerville’s Paradise Garden created by Howard Finster, one of America’s most widely known and prolific self-taught artists.

The Ashburn Peanut is a beloved landmark for those driving south along I-75 while the Plains Peanut has the same smile as President Jimmy Carter. While in Plains, be sure to tour the Jimmy Carter National Historical Park to learn more about America’s 39th president.

The Doll’s Head Trail is a funky Atlanta hike and the faces carved into trees on St. Simons Island make for a mystical treasure hunt.

Macon © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

6. Catch a drive-in movie

Although there aren’t many drive-in theaters left, summertime is great for catching an outdoor film in Georgia. Gather your friends, chairs, and snacks for a new or second-run movie. Swan Drive In in Blue Ridge, Starlight in Atlanta, Jesup Drive In in Jesup, Tiger Drive In in Tiger, and Wilderness Outdoor Movie Theater in Trenton are ones you can check out around the state. Wilderness has the world’s largest screen!

7. Eat a peach

Nothing says Georgia more than peaches. Summer is the best time to get them from roadside stands and in restaurants. There are plenty of ways to enjoy the state fruit whether in fried pies, milkshakes, peach wine, jams, or straight from the tree.

Laura S, Walker State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

8. Make a run for it

An Atlanta (and Georgia) tradition is the world’s largest 10K race: the AJC Peachtree Road Race. It winds from Buckhead to Midtown every July 4. Runners also can participate virtually by running 6.2 miles wherever they choose. Even if you’re not up for the race itself, make a sign to cheer on the competitors.

9. Go on a farm stay

Get up close with the animals at one of Georgia’s farm stays and guest ranches. In Bluffton, White Oak Pastures is a working cattle farm with guest cabins.

In Madison, Crafdal Farm Alpacas lets you stay in rustic cabins on the same property as alpacas, and Southern Cross Guest Ranch is a dude ranch with horseback riding.

Bavarian village of Helen © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

10. Tour a historic home

Choose a part of the state and there’s a historic home you can learn about.

In Atlanta, it might be the Swan House at the Atlanta History Center which film fans will recognize as President Snow’s mansion in The Hunger Games: Catching Fire. In Macon, tour the 18,000-square-foot Hay House known as the Palace of the South.

Hills and Dales Estate in LaGrange, the Callaway family home, and the Little White House in Warm Springs where President Franklin Delano Roosevelt retreated also can’t be missed.

11. Chow down on ice cream

Cool off with a cool treat! Georgia has some fantastic ice cream establishments.

You’ve likely heard of Leopold’s in Savannah which usually has a line down the street. The parlor has been scooping ice cream since 1919 including its famous Tutti Frutti flavor (rum ice cream with candied fruit and freshly roasted Georgia pecans).

Lane Southern Orchards makes peach ice cream as does Jaemor Farms where you’ll want to add a fresh fried pie to your order.

In Atlanta, Jake’s Ice Cream is a must-stop if you’re walking the Atlanta Beltline and in the Grant Park neighborhood be sure to stop into one of Historic Oakland Cemetery’s newest neighbors, oh-so-sweet Cereal and Cream.

Georgia Music Hall of Fame in Macon © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

If a Georgia getaway is on your mind this summer you’ll want to check out these posts:

Worth Pondering…

Georgia On My Mind

Georgia, Georgia, the whole day through

Just an old sweet song keeps Georgia on my mind.

Georgia, Georgia, a song of you

Comes as sweet and clear as moonlight through the pines

—words by Stuart Gorrell and music by Hoagy Carmichael

What to Know Before Planning Your National Park Summer Vacation

From when to book a reservation to how to avoid traffic

This year, visiting the national parks—one of America’s favorite summer pastimes—will take a bit of extra strategizing. Following the trend of recent years, summer 2023 is shaping up to once again shatter visitor records across the national parks system. 

The National Park Service (NPS) recorded nearly 312 million recreational visits in 2022, a five percent increase over the number of visits in 2021. As you can imagine, this increased wear and tear on hiking trails, park roads, visitor centers, and park amenities like restrooms, restaurants, and gift shops. Road construction, trail repairs and closures, and traffic delays will be widespread this summer. 

Zion National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Worse still, record snowfall in the West is still melting, causing troubles of its own like flooding and landslides. So, as you gear up to have a memorable national parks vacation, keep organized and stay on top of park websites and social media for the latest updates—and most of all, be patient and flexible. Here’s what you should expect.

There will be a lot of traffic

Prepare for road closures and delays. From Grand Teton and Glacier to Rocky Mountain and Zion—even the Blue Ridge Parkway—units across the National Park Service are diligently making much-needed repairs and upgrades to roads, hiking trails, parking lots, and visitor facilities.

At Yellowstone, construction projects are taking place across the park to address last year’s devastating flood damage, stabilize road bridges, and rehabilitate the most heavily trafficked routes including a 20+ mile section of Grand Loop Road which allows access to Old Faithful.

Pro tip: Stay on top of park websites for closures, delays, and traffic. Yellowstone, for one, has a page dedicated to updates on road status including wait times and webcams showing current traffic conditions at park entrances.

Blue Ridge Parkway © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

You’ll want to bring plastic

Not plastic bottles but plastic credit and debit cards. Many parks are going cashless. The idea is that by freeing national park staff from handling and processing cash they can spend more time improving visitor experiences and making park upgrades.

So far this year, more than a dozen national park units have opted to go cash-free including Mount Rainier, Badlands, and Crater Lake. That’s on top of various other NPS units including certain monuments, historic sites, lakeshores, and recreation areas which no longer accept cash.

Pro tip: If you must use cash purchase a prepaid gift card at a grocery or convenience store ahead of your visit to pay for park entrance. Some general stores, resorts, and historical associations within gateway towns may also accept cash for park passes.

Lassen Volcanic National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

You may need a reservation

Long gone are the days when you could just show up at a national park for a scenic drive or an invigorating hike. Some of the most popular parks including Arches and Glacier now require reservations generally in the form of a timed entry ticket that enables access to either the entire park or to a popular corridor like Bear Lake Road at Rocky Mountain.

Several parks also require advance planning to check off the most popular hiking trails. You’ve got to win a permit lottery to hike Half Dome at Yosemite or Angels Landing at Zion. At Shenandoah, a day-use ticket is required to hike Old Rag from March through November.

Pro tip: Set a calendar alert. Every park manages their reservation system differently in terms of when they release timed entry permits. Know when a park will release permits or open a lottery and set your calendar accordingly. And don’t dally. Some permits can be gone within 15 minutes.

Shenandoah National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Some sections of parks will open late this season—if at all

The West got a whole lot of snow this winter. It’s going to take time to melt but as it does, runoff is going to cause rivers and creeks to swell, making for potentially dangerous conditions including slippery rocks and unsafe pedestrian bridges which can cause closures.

The opening of Yosemite’s Glacier Point Road is at least one month behind schedule due to record snowfall and road construction. It’s not expected to open until at least July. Floodwaters in Yosemite Valley are also causing intermittent closure of campgrounds.

Arches National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The 30-mile highway through Lassen Volcanic National Park recently opened for the 2023 summer season though sections might seem like winter. A higher-than-average snowpack has been fully cleared. Visitors to the park should prepare for winter conditions at higher elevations and possible delays due to ongoing road work.

Pro tip: Seek out updates on park websites but also be flexible and open to alternatives. Chat up rangers to identify open park sections and trails that may not have been on your original plan.

Worth Pondering…

I encourage everybody to hop on Google and type in national park in whatever state they live in and see the beauty that lies in their own backyard. It’s that simple.

—Jordan Fisher, American actor and musician