10 Reasons Why the Super C Motorhome Is the King of RVs

Super C motorhomes have numerous benefits for travelers with specific needs. Let’s take a closer look at 10 of the reasons for owning one.

What’s so super about a Super C motorhome? Lots of things and I’ll go down the list one by one. Are they sturdy, powerful, and comfortable? Check, check, and check. In fact, they might just be the most versatile style of RVs.

With just a quick look up and down the highway or around the RV parks, you’ll see they’re growing in popularity. I’ll show why they’ve earned the crown as the king (or queen!) of all RVs.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What is a Super C motorhome?

As the name implies, a Super C motorhome is a bigger, more rugged version of a Class C motorhome. They can be quite luxurious, too!

A Super C is a souped-up version of a traditional Class C motorhome.

Like the Class C, a Super C motorhome has a distinctive cab-over area in the front that’s usually a sleeping area. And that’s along with a bedroom in the back plus a kitchen, bathroom, separate shower, dinette, and living area. What’s different is the Super C is built on a heavy-duty truck chassis rather than a van chassis so it’s sturdier and can carry heavier loads. 

This opens up possibilities for better-quality furnishings and accessories—and more of them. The Super C has more storage space and more power under the hood. A Super C motorhome is big—typically ranging from around 33 feet to about 45 feet. It’s safe to say that many RV parks can accommodate them, even with a vehicle in tow.

➡ You might consider a Super C a big rig but some RV parks and campgrounds have a different opinion. Before you book a stay, find out What Does Big Rig Friendly Really Mean?

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

10 reasons why Super C motorhomes are RV royalty

I’ve already checked quite a few boxes in favor of the Super C motorhome. I’ll expound on those a bit and add a few more to explain why they reign supreme.

1. They have a powerful engine and driveline

A Super C has its engine in the front and it’s usually a diesel (but not always). The engines pack a lot of power, too. These are large displacement engines with lots of horsepower and torque to carry heavy loads and tackle challenging terrain.

Many times Super C motorhomes have a more robust drive than even the biggest class A motorhomes. Like a semi, many of them have two sets of dual rear wheels and sometimes both are powered giving them far more carrying capacity and traction.

2. Safer in a crash

A Super C’s heavy-duty truck chassis will hold up better in a collision. With the engine in front (unlike a diesel pusher) you have more of a protective barrier in a head-on crash. And with a wider wheelbase they’re less likely to overturn.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

3. They drive like trucks

Super C motorhomes may have more muscle than what you’re used to but it’s probably within your comfort zone. Getting behind the wheel of a Super C is more or less like driving a big pickup truck with a truck camper on the back.

By comparison, there’s a bigger learning curve with the larger, lumbering Class A motorhomes. Driving a Class A is more like driving a bus because you’re positioned on top of the front wheels rather than behind them.

4. Straightforward maintenance

Those truck engines are easy to work on and most mechanics have experience with them. You won’t have to hunt down a specialist when you need to do some repairs. And it may be a while before you do. Heavy-duty truck engines are designed to go for hundreds of thousands of miles with routine maintenance.

5. Ride in comfort

When in transit, the extra weight and width of the Super C motorhome’s heavy-duty chassis give you tons of stability. Combine that with air suspension and you’ve got an exceptionally smooth ride. This is true on open highways as well as bumpy country roads.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

6. Quality interiors

Because Super Cs can carry heavier loads, manufacturers don’t have to compromise by using lightweight materials. Many of these motorhomes have upgraded components and features like solid wood cabinetry, granite countertops, tile flooring, and electric fireplaces.

7. Spacious floorplans 

Those wider wheelbases are often a bit longer, too. A few extra inches here and there can add up to much more living space, even king-sized beds. In addition, some Super C motorhomes have multiple slide-outs so you can stretch out even more.

8. Significant towing capacity

With a Super C, you’ll be able to bring along a second vehicle to use as a daily driver. Or, you may want to tow your boat or other toys you can’t leave behind. Towing capacities of 10,000 pounds to 20,000 pounds are more typical but some models can tow up to 25,000 pounds.

9. Large holding tanks

Bigger tanks mean you can stay in one place longer even off the grid. It’s not unusual for a Super C to have a fresh water capacity of 100 to 150 gallons. Count on 75 gallons or so for black and grey tanks.

10. Increased storage (and cargo carrying capacity)

While Class C motorhomes are notorious for their limited storage space, their super-sized cousins have more room to spare. The roomy basement area is more like what you’d expect to find on a Class A motorhome. You’ll still need to pack wisely but you can definitely carry more things with you.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Do you need a special driver’s license to drive a Super C?

In most places, you don’t need any kind of special driver’s license to drive a motorhome if you’re doing it for recreational purposes. However, if it’s for business, you should have a Commercial Driver’s License (CDL).

These laws vary from state to state and province to province but most of them don’t have any particular restrictions on RVs that weigh less than 26,000 pounds. Most Super C motorhomes weigh more than that and you might need a special license so check your state or provincial laws.

How much does a Super C motorhome cost?

You can expect to pay $500,000 or more for a brand-new Super C off the lot. And when we say or more, it could be considerably more. The price could rise as high as $775,000 depending on the manufacturer and what kinds of extras it has. On the other hand, you may be able to buy a used one for $150,000 to $200,000.

While we’re talking numbers, you should also consider fuel costs. Unfortunately, many Super C motorhomes get less than 10 mpg.

Pro tip: Some motorhome buyers forget to factor in the cost of the RV lifestyle.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Are you considering a Super C motorhome?

As you can see, the Super C motorhome has a lot going for it. They’re spacious, easy to drive, and have high-end features. In fact, you might even feel like you’re riding on a cushion of air thanks to the suspension. 

Super C motorhomes are also powerful, safe, and dependable. And if you have a maintenance issue, they’re usually not difficult to repair.

It’s no wonder we see so many running the roads and settling in for long stays. They may not be the ideal rig for everyone but there are many Super C owners who wouldn’t want any other kind of RV.

Worth Pondering…

No matter where we go in our motorhome, that sense of independence is satisfying. We have our own facilities, from comfortable bed to a fridge full of our favorite foods. We set the thermostat the way we like it and go to bed and get up in our usual routine.

Class B or Class C: Which Motorhome is Right for You?

If you’re wondering, “Is a Class B or Class C motorhome right for me?” you aren’t alone

Should I get a Class B or Class C motorhome? Whether you’re looking to buy your first RV or ready to move on to a new one, that’s the big question many RVers face when heading out to make that big purchase.

But how do you know which one is for you? 

Let’s start with Class Bs. 

Class B motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The Class B motorhomes and vanlife

Two factors are driving the growth in Class B motorhomes. The first is downsizing with more people wanting to get into something a little more maneuverable.

The Class B motorhome is also referred to as a campervan. They have become so popular that they have spawned a movement called vanlife. 

The second big factor is technology. Lithium-ion batteries, solar panels, and more now make it possible to connect with the world as you’re driving and, well, work from anywhere.

Class B+ motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Understanding the Class B motorhome

If you’re looking at a Class B, you’re talking about an RV that is built on a commercial van chassis. That includes the Mercedes Sprinter chassis, the Ford Transit chassis, or the Dodge ProMaster chassis.

So, it’s really the smallest of motorhomes. Yet, they still have sinks, stoves, refrigerators, holding tanks, toilets, house batteries, beds, sitting areas, and even entertainment features.

When it comes to engines, Class B motorhomes are either gas or diesel. A Class B generally get about 10-25 miles per gallon.

Class B motorhomes are designed in various lengths generally ranging from 18 to about 23 feet.

They also have different floor plans offering various combinations of sleeping arrangements whether traveling alone or with others. The different floor plans are a big attraction for many Class B owners.

Of course, you’ll wonder about storage and tank capacity in the smaller RVs and you’d be right if you suspect both are limited. However, what they lack in storage they make up for in compact agility because driving a Class B is like driving a minivan.

Class B+ motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

That means fitting into smaller campsites and easier maneuverability when getting into or out of or visiting a town. The versatility, in fact, is one of the primary reasons many prefer Class Bs.

Many of these smaller rigs come with lithium house batteries and solar panels to maximize and extend electrical output.

However, if you’re thinking Class Bs are less expensive because they’re smaller, you will be disappointed.  Delivering the luxury features of larger coaches compressed into smaller spaces creates engineering and construction challenges which translate to higher costs.  In addition to the engineering challenge many Class B motorhomes use more costly higher-end components like lithium batteries in their designs.

Class C motorhomes

One of the most popular segments in the motorhome industry is the Class C. First off, Class C motorhomes have an instantly recognizable silhouette. Here’s what a typical Class C motorhome looks like.

Class C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The classic Class C motorhome cab is covered by an overhang or cab-over that in most models houses a bed. A short passageway leads into the body of the motorhome usually a step or two up from the driver’s compartment. They are built on a cutaway truck chassis.

But first, let’s clear something up.

You may have heard the term Class B+ motorhome. They are small motorhomes that do not have the front overhang. But a so-called B+ motorhome really IS a Class C motorhome. The industry just made up that B+ designation.

Here’s a picture of Class B+ motorhome.

Class B+ motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

But for the purpose of this article, I’m talking about the classic Class C motorhome with that distinctive cab overhang.

CLICK HERE to read an article on the Class B + motorhome

The cutaway truck chassis a Class C motorhome is built on is able to carry more weight and that gives RV manufacturers the freedom to add more bulk.

As expected, everything is a bit bigger with Class Cs: a separate dining area, larger stove and refrigerator, and larger storage tanks for water, waste, and propane. The bathroom is larger and usually with a shower stall separate from the toilet. There are usually one or two slide outs for extra width when parked.

When it comes to storage, Class Cs typically offer plenty of cupboards and hiding spaces inside and several storage compartments outside.

In fact, some of the modern Class C motorhomes are so large that they rival the Class A or bus-style motorhome in space and amenities. They range all the way up to 41 feet in length though most are between 25-30 feet.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Super Class C motorhomes: When you need even more space

Yes, there is Class Cs that go beyond the 26-foot mark—some up to 45 feet. They’re the Super Class C motorhomes. They are built on a heavy-duty truck chassis and are able to tow huge loads.

The name pretty much says it all! Super C motorhomes are larger versions of traditional Class C motorhomes. More specifically, that extra space gives these unique RVs all the luxuries of a Class A Motorhome with additional safety features.

Here are some of the Super Class C motorhome advantages:

  • Wider wheel-base: This creates a safer and more enjoyable driving experience.
  • Tons of exterior storage: Most Super C RVs have exterior storage running the length of the body.
  • Tow and cargo carrying capacity: Super Cs have powerful engines; some can tow up to 25,000 pounds.
  • Easier to repair: Using traditional large-truck engines, there are a lot more service shops that can work on your engine. Unlike Class As, the engine is easily accessible from outside thr RV.
Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

To be clear, Super C is really a made-up RV classification just like the B+ motorhome. Most of the Super Cs would be on the Ford F550 or the Freightmaster chassis. They have much more in common with Class A motorhomes than their smaller cousins including multiple slides.

Bottom line: It’s really big and yet somehow maintains the Class C classification. It’s pretty cool though.

So, Class B (or B+) or Class C (or Super C) motorhome?

Worth Pondering…

We are all faced with a series of great opportunities brilliantly disguised as unsolvable problems.

—John W. Gardner

What is a Super C Motorhome?

There are different types and classes of RVs available to own, each with perks that are enjoyable and well worth having. But every RVer is different and we all have different priorities based on our lifestyles and styles of camping.

When it comes to motorized (vs towable) you can choose from Class A, B, or C, each of which has its pros and cons. But there’s another class of motorized RV on the market that might surprise you and today I explore it in depth. Welcome to the Super C motorhome.

Class A motorhome (diesel pusher) © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

What are the classes of motorhomes?

As I mentioned above, there are several different classes of motorhome. What are they?

Class A motorhomes are the big, box-like vehicles that look the most like a bus and it’s what we drive. The house or living area extends from bumper to bumper giving Class A motorhomes the largest amount of living space for their length which is one reason for their popularity.

Class A motorhomes are available in two basic categories: Gas and diesel, obviously based on the fuel they use. Due to their rugged durability and higher torque, diesel engines are used to power the largest Class A motorhomes. Those powerful engines and the additional carrying capacity they bring allow for larger rigs with lots more heavy gear stuffed into them. Hence the higher price for a diesel-powered RV.

The engine in a Class A motorhome can be located at the front or the rear of the RV but gas rigs typically have front-mounted engines and diesel engines are usually in the rear. This is where the term diesel pusher comes from as the engine pushes the RV from the back.

Class A motorhomes come in a variety of lengths but because larger diesel models are built on rugged heavy-duty chassis they can extend up to 45 feet in length. Most diesel rigs also benefit from the luxurious ride that air suspension brings.

These large Class A motorhomes are great for people like us who live half-time plus in our RV. They can offer lots of space for both living and storage as well as large fresh, grey, and black tanks to accommodate more people and/or and more time in the boondocks. Depending on the size and floorplan, Class A motorhomes can sleep anywhere from 2 to 8 people and larger models provide ample storage space in full pass-through basement compartments.

New Class A motorhomes can range in price from over $100,000 to $2,000,000 (that’s mostly for the highest-end bus conversions) depending on their size, quality, and amenities. So the cost can be a big deterrent to owning one. And because they can get quite large, another drawback is that they can be more difficult to maneuver and harder to park. Some state and national parks won’t have sites large enough to accommodate them.

As they get larger, it becomes even more important to tow a small vehicle for exploring. Driving a Class A motorhome into town or to a remote trailhead falls somewhere between cumbersome and impossible depending on where you’re traveling.

Class B motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Contrary to what may seem logical, motorhome types (A, B, and C) aren’t in size order with A being the largest and B being the smallest. If they’d consulted with me when they were crafting the naming scheme, I would have told them to put them in order!

Class B motorhomes are at the opposite end of the spectrum from Class A motorhomes being the smallest and most fuel-efficient motorhomes available. They drive and park like a van because they’re primarily built using van-based chassis: traditionally from Ford or Chevy but these days the more common choice is either the Mercedes Sprinter or Ram ProMaster. Their small size makes them easy to maneuver on city streets as well as in the boondocks making them versatile as both a home base at camp AND a vehicle to go out and explore in.

The drawback of a Class B motorhome is that they’re highly limited in terms of space and don’t usually accommodate more than one or two (very close, very tolerant) people and maybe a small child (or a small pet or two). There are people who full-time in them for which I give major props!

Class C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Class C motorhomes are the middle child of the motorized RVing world and can vary significantly in size and length. They’ll accommodate more people and have more amenities and larger tanks than Class B motorhomes and are less expensive and easier to drive and park than most Class A motorhomes. They’re recognizable because of the large over-cab extension that often houses an additional bed for kids or guests.

One surprising note about Class C motorhomes—if you need additional sleeping accommodations, many of them provide more than even the largest Class A rigs! That’s probably because they’re often designed with the ability to be the perfect family hauler.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

So what is a Super C motorhome?

With all of the options listed above there are still travelers whose needs and desires are different. They want a motorhome that’s larger than a typical Class C with more luxury and more space but they don’t want the style of a Class A motorhome. They’re looking for a heavier vehicle, a larger chassis, and maybe a more significant towing capacity. What’s a traveler to do with this conundrum?

That’s where a Super C motorhome is perfect! It takes the best attributes of a Class C—and super-sizes it all

The benefits of choosing a Super C motorhome

Super C motorhomes have numerous benefits for travelers with specific needs. Let’s take a closer look at some of the greatest perks of owning one.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

More robust chassis in a Super C motorhome

The foundation of a Super C motorhome is a larger, heavier-duty chassis than a standard Class C—much more akin to the chassis used for a Class A. They can range from the more consumer-grade heavy-duty truck chassis from Ford (like the F550) up to full-on truck chassis from Freightliner and even Volvo. Everything about the chassis is more robust: chassis rails are larger and stiffer; axles are larger with greater carrying capacity; wheels and brakes (often air brakes) are bigger to support and stop the extra weight; and, of course, engines are bigger and more powerful!

More living space

The larger, heavier-duty chassis of a Super C enables the manufacturers to increase the size of the motorhome overall which means that it offers more living space, the ability to accommodate more travelers (for sleeping, dining, and riding), and loads of storage space for everything you want to bring along.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Larger tank capacities on a Super C motorhome

More space in holding tanks is another advantage of the Super C motorhome. Larger models can have freshwater tanks that hold 100-150 gallons of fresh water and grey and black tanks that hold up to 75 gallons each. That makes the behemoth Super Cs ripe for some serious boondocking.

Lots of exterior storage

The number of storage compartments as well as the large size of those compartments allows you to bring a multitude of recreational items for the enjoyment of the entire family. These might include bikes, kayaks, paddleboards, surfboards, parasails, skis, and golf clubs.

Most RVers carry some basic tools for minor repairs and modifications on the road but the Super C motorhomes allow for the carrying of just about any set of tools a DIYer might want to have on hand.

The large, heavy chassis allows you to carry heavy loads and makes it a breeze to bring lots of toys along.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Higher towing capacity

The bigger chassis and larger (usually diesel) engines of Super C motorhomes allow for larger hitch receivers and larger towing capacities.

A Super C motorhome might have a towing capacity between 10,000 and 20,000 pounds. For this reason, the Super C is a common choice for travelers who haul large trailers for car racing, for example.

Great stability on the road

The larger, heavier chassis and longer wheelbase mean that the Super C motorhome is more firmly planted while driving making it more secure on the road and less susceptible to buffeting by larger vehicles. This is an attractive feature for most drivers as tall, flat-sided vehicles tend to feel the wind from both nature and large passing vehicles in a dramatic way.

More comfortable ride

Just like Class A motorhomes, Super Cs often come with air-ride suspension. The large airbags that support the weight of the coach on the chassis help to soften the ride and make them comfortable options for long-range driving. Several Super C motorhome models go so far as to incorporate air-ride driver’s seats just like a long-haul commercial truck would. That extreme isolation from the bumps and vibration of everyday driving DEFINITELY makes for a super-comfortable ride.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Super C motorhomes provide easier access for maintenance

Another benefit of the Super C motorhome is that the engine is located under the hood in the front of the vehicle which makes access for maintenance easier than that of a Class A gas or diesel pusher. Whether you’re doing your maintenance or taking it into a shop that access can come in handy.

Safety

Another benefit of the heavy engine under the hood is that it serves as protection and may provide a larger crumple zone in the event of a collision. Additionally, heavy vehicles like the Super C motorhomes tend to fare well in all but the most serious crashes due to their sheer size and weight.

The extra stability provided by the design of the Super C motorhome is another safety feature that is surely felt as one drives down the road in such a heavy, stable rig.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The disadvantages of choosing a Super C motorhome

While the Super C motorhome provides many excellent benefits, I’d be remiss if I didn’t include in this overview some of the disadvantages as well.

Higher price point

One big disadvantage especially with larger or more luxurious models can be the cost. Super C motorhomes typically range in price from $150,000–$800,000 with most new models costing more than $400,000. As with any other class of motorhome, the make, model, and age of the RV (i.e. whether it’s new or used) are cost factors. But in general, Super C RVs come at a high price point.

Fuel economy

The advantages of the heavier, larger Super C come at another cost as well. The bigger, thirstier engines consume a fair amount of fuel. Most Super C owners report fewer than ten miles per gallon. Towing a heavy towed car or large trailer behind the RV only decreases the fuel efficiency further.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Super C motorhomesc can be harder to drive/park

Bigger is not always better. Larger RVs (regardless of Class/Type) can be harder to drive and certainly make parking more challenging. Not only can it be difficult to navigate city or small-town streets but not all parking lots accommodate such large vehicles. And even when they have sufficient space, those lots can be difficult to get into with a very large rig.

The other prominent issue is campsite accommodation. Many campsites are not equipped to handle a Super C motorhome especially one hauling a long trailer. Most national park campgrounds are unable to accommodate such a large rig, for example, or the few large sites they do offer are often full.

So, while a Super C motorhome may cruise down the highway with little effort, turning, navigating small streets, parking, and backing can present unique challenges for the Super C motorhome owner.

Less living space than a comparable Class A

While having the engine up front under the hood offers advantages for ease of maintenance and safety, it does have a negative: that space is lost. So a 40-foot Super C will have less living space than a 40-foot Class A. While many Super C motorhomes will have driver and passenger seats that swivel around to offer seating in the front living area, the space consumed by the hood is still lost.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Do you need a CDL to drive a Super C motorhome?

Based specifically on the class of RV, a CDL is not required to drive a Super C RV. However, the size and weight of the rig can be a factor depending on the state or province in which you’re licensed.

For those who are unfamiliar, a CDL or Commercial Driver’s License must be obtained by truckers and commercial bus drivers. The driver of a Super C motorhome does not need to obtain a license like this based on the fact that he or she is driving a Super C but there are states and Canadian provinces that do require a driver to obtain a non-commercial version of this type of license if your rig weighs over 26,000 pounds, if it can carry more than 16 passengers, or if it’s equipped with air brakes.

Many Super C motorhomes weigh at or near 26,000 pounds but if you’re opting for a mode of Super C that exceeds 26,000 pounds you’ll likely need an enhanced license to do so. Check with your state or provincial motor vehicle agency to be sure. In general, it’s the state where you’re licensed that matters most. If you’re legal to drive a certain vehicle in your home state, other states offer reciprocity by allowing you to drive there as well even if they have more stringent requirements for their residents to be licensed.

Is a Super C motorhome right for you?

Choosing the class of RV that’s right for you involves evaluating your needs and desires as a traveler as well as where you intend to travel and where you intend to camp. Other important considerations include cost, fuel efficiency, and whether you need to accommodate a certain number of passengers and/or to be able to haul a small or large load.

A Super C motorhome is a wonderful, high-end rig that is just right for a unique population of travelers but it’s not a rig for everyone. While these fantastic RVs hold a multitude of advantages for some travelers they may be cost-prohibitive and/or excessively large for RVers who are traveling to explore smaller campsites in state and national parks, cities, or small lakeside campgrounds.

Many manufacturers offer Super C models including (but not limited to): Dynamax (Isata, Europa, DX3 and others), Renegade RV (Renegade XL, Ikon, Valencia, and Verona), Jayco (Seneca), Nexus RV (Triumph SC, Wraith, and Ghost), and Thor (Omni and Magnitude).

Super C motorhomes have become popular enough that even Newmar has gotten in on the game offering two models—the Super Star and the Supreme Aire. So there are plenty of options available for you to choose from.

Super C motorhome © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Conclusion

While the focus of this post has been the Super C motorhome, there are so many choices out there. From the multitude of driveable Class A, B, and C rigs to the wide variety of towables, there’s a rig out there for almost everyone who wants to travel and camp.

And if a Super C doesn’t sound like it would be the right choice for you, how about a look at some small Class A motorhomes, instead?

Worth Pondering…

Life, with its rules, its obligations, and its freedoms, is like a sonnet: You’re given the form, but you have to write the sonnet yourself.

—Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle in Time (1962)

What’s Next Is Almost Here

Newmar to Introduce Super C at RVX

RVX: The RV Experience, launching March 12-14, 2019 in Salt Lake City, will be the industry’s biggest event, designed to spark consumer interest in the RV lifestyle shared by millions of Americans by unveiling the latest products, celebrating innovation, and providing inspiration and education to dealers to drive RV businesses forward.

RVX will be the official “Kick-off to Camping Season” that will showcase the industry’s newest and best-selling products to dealers and consumers back home. This is NOT a consumer show, but a show that will highlight the products coming to market in the spring.

Newmar recently announced that it will unveil its first Super C model at RVX at 2 p.m. ET on March 13 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The manufacturer reported that the unit has been in research and development for the past two years.

The new 2020 Super Star will be live-streamed from the Newmar display.

The Super C RV will feature both a full air-ride cab and a full-wall slide-out.

Debuting at RVX 2019 is one of two models that not only represent the first we’ve ever built, but the first and only RVs in their class to feature both a full air-cab and a full-wall slideout. Don’t miss your chance to see it live on March 13 at 12 pm MST / 2 pm EST!

The RV Industry Association is the national trade association representing RV manufacturers and their component parts suppliers who together build more than 98 percent of all RVs produced in the U.S., and approximately 60 percent of RVs produced worldwide.

A manufacturer of Class A motorhomes, Newmar has chosen to lead rather than follow and deliver a high level of craftsmanship, innovation, and customer support. Newmar was founded in 1968 for one simple reason: to build a better RV.

NEWMAR: When You Know The Difference

Worth Pondering…

We chose an RV and RV lifestyle that’s right for us.