10 Amazing Places to RV in November 2022

If you’re dreaming of where to travel to experience it all, here are my picks for the best places to RV in November

Just because things hadn’t gone the way I had planned didn’t necessarily mean they had gone wrong.

—Ann Patchett

Author Ann Patchett’s self-inspired essay “What Now?”—the work in which these reaffirming words appear—offers hope to those who find themselves at a crossroads. Patchett describes being thrust into many unfamiliar situations but finding fulfillment throughout those unexpected journeys much like many of the characters endured in Bel Canto, a gritty yet tender novel for which she received critical acclaim. This quote is a reminder that our path in life is always changing and curveballs can offer some of our greatest lessons and joys. While we may set out to accomplish certain goals there’s no greater tool than having an open mind and a willingness to accept wherever the road may take us.

The freedom of the open road can be intoxicating but when the options are as endless as the horizon we could all use a little direction. Rerouting is about following whims down unbeaten paths whether you’re looking to stop short for roadside attractions, whip around mountain passes, or clink glasses in a dusty saloon. Each line on the map is a promise and some of life’s best memories are made on the move. So turn up the radio, shift into gear, and don’t forget to hydrate—let’s get this show on the road.

Planning an RV trip for a different time of year? Check out my monthly travel recommendations for the best places to travel in September and October. Also, check out my recommendations from November 2021 and December 2021.

Carlsbad Caverns © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Plunge into the Depths of the Earth at Carlsbad Caverns

Descend nearly 800 feet below ground into a series of completely dark, breathtaking caves.

Carlsbad Caverns National Park is hidden within the remote parts of southeastern New Mexico. More than just a cave, Carlsbad Caverns is a completely immersive experience. Beginning with a several-mile descent from the cave opening, travelers will emerge into massive caverns full of magnificent rock formations, stalactites, stalagmites, and more. The paved decline is steep but accessible for most people. There is also an elevator available to transport visitors as needed.

Urbanna Oyster Festival © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Oyster Lovers

Turn off the main road or cruise up the Rappahannock River from the Chesapeake Bay to the charming and friendly historic Colonial port town of Urbanna. Home of Virginia’s Official Oyster Festival (65th annual; November 4-5, 2022) more boats than folks and laid-back innkeepers, shopkeepers, chefs, and townspeople. You will see where tons of tobacco were loaded onto ships to sail back to Europe and the Famous Mitchell map is displayed at the visitor center located in the James Mills Scottish Factor Store.

Charleston © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Wander Cobblestone Streets and Shoreline in Charleston

It’s easy to be transported back in time while exploring Charleston, the oldest city in South Carolina. Bordering the cobblestone streets are enormous trees and centuries-old Colonial and Victorian homes. Horse-drawn carriages clop through the moss-draped historic district. You can wade in Pineapple Fountain at Waterfront Park or through waves on Folly Beach. Over on Wadmalaw Island, Deep Water Vineyards offers six tasting pours and a souvenir glass for just $15. Even better, the top attraction in Charleston is the ambiance, free of charge.  

Jekyll Island Club © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Jekyll Island Shrimp & Grits Festival

Jekyll Island was once a private island owned by ultra-rich families such as the Rockefellers, Morgans, Cranes, and Pulitzers. Today the island is owned by the state of Georgia but remnants of the island’s glamorous past can be seen in its National Historic Landmark District where you’ll find opulent mansions and the Jekyll Island Club Hotel, formerly the Jekyll Island Club House founded in 1886.

A coastal favorite, the Jekyll Island Shrimp and Grits Festival returns November 4-6. The festival combines the classic southern dish with family-friendly entertainment, an artist’s market, live music, a kids’ zone, food, a craft brew fest, and more. The island comes alive during this award-winning three-day event held under the oaks in Jekyll Island’s National Historic Landmark District

Superstitions Mountain Museum © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Search for the Lost Dutchman’s Gold Mine

Nothing more perfectly sums up Arizona’s sense of adventure than the search for the Lost Dutchman’s Gold Mine. The truth behind the legend is harder to pin down than a Gila monster but the gist is that somewhere hidden in the Superstition Mountains just east of Phoenix is a gold mine once tended by German immigrants Jacob Waltz and Jacob Weiser.

Superstitions Mountain Museum © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The two men pulled untold amounts of the precious metal from the mountain before a murderous run-in with—depending on who you ask—Apaches or each other left all who knew the mine’s location dead.

To this day, adventurers set out into the Superstitions in search of the mine. Sadly, more than a few have met the same fate as Waltz and Weiser.

Peralta Trailhead © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

If you’re not particularly interested in hunting for gold, there are still more than a dozen access points into the surrounding wilderness that can take you on a short day walk or a multi-day expedition. Give the Peralta Trail a shot— this nearly five-mile hike is one of the most popular.

Jekyll Island © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Island-hop through the Golden Isles

Georgia’s Golden Isles have a variety of experiences whether you’re on a family vacation or a private getaway. The hardest part is choosing which area to spend your time in!

St. Simons Island is beloved for its family-friendly vibes. Take a post-dinner stroll to the Pier Village for shopping, ice cream, and views of the Atlantic Ocean.

Jekyll Island Campground © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Start the day with sunrise at the photographer’s favorite Driftwood Beach. The Wanderer Memory Trail tells the important story of the Wanderer, a slave ship that illegally landed 160 years ago. The Georgia Sea Turtle Center is home to rescued and rehabilitated sea turtles. Jekyll Island has a variety of accommodation options including the Jekyll Island Club Resort, once a members-only club for Gilded Age millionaires, and Jekyll Island Campground.

Or disconnect at Little St. Simons Island, one of the least developed of Georgia’s barrier islands covering 10,000 acres with 7 miles of shoreline. The Lodge on Little St. Simons has homey cottages where guests enjoy daily meals, naturalist hikes, and kayaking.

Charming Brunswick is the can’t-miss gateway to the islands. Wander the city streets and squares with historic homes and buildings from the 1800s, shops, restaurants, and a distillery. Learn about the coastal ecosystem on a shrimping tour with Lady Jane Shrimpin’ Excursion.

Zion National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Zion National Park

Summer is not the best time to visit Utah national parks (but then, of course, summer is the season of road trips) but the truth is—if you have the flexibility—shoulder seasons are a much better time to visit the state. The temperatures are cooler and if you haven’t seen a fall desert sunset you are missing a truly life-changing experience.

Zion National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Zion is the park I would visit in November for a few reasons—the aforementioned temperature and light(er) crowds, of course—but also still being able to comfortably hike through the water of The Narrows. Hiking The Narrows is for many a bucket list experience. And for a hike that is nearly 16 miles through water. Still warm, with fewer fellow hikers, and still enough daylight to get in some serious miles.

Also hike Angel’s Landing… if you dare. Angel’s Landing is 4.4 mile heavy-trafficked out-and-back trail that features a river and is rated as difficult.

Gettysburg National Military Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

High Water Mark of the Rebellion

The Battle of Gettysburg was a turning point in the Civil War, the Union victory that ended General Robert E. Lee’s second and most ambitious invasion of the North. Often referred to as the “High Water Mark of the Rebellion”, Gettysburg was the Civil War’s bloodiest battle and was also the inspiration for President Abraham Lincoln’s immortal “Gettysburg Address”.

Gettysburg National Military Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Gettysburg is the kind of place you could make a quick stop or spend a full day exploring. The battlefield has roads so it’s easy to drive from one monument or site to the next. There’s an audio tour and there is even an app you can download to help add dimension to what you’re seeing and to find the highlights at the park.

It’s especially haunting thinking about the brave and dedicated men who walked into certain death across open fields during battle. It helps to have an appreciation for military history but even families will enjoy a visit. Some recommended reading beforehand: The Red Badge of Courage for background and The Killer Angels.

USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Famous Battleship and Museum from Under Siege

At Mobile’s Battleship Memorial Park, you don’t have to look far to find heroes. From the Battleship, USS Alabama to the Submarine USS Drum and over 25 aircraft the spirit of military pride is here. History meets heroism from World War II to Iraqi Freedom at one of America’s finest military parks.

At Battleship Memorial Park you’ll walk the decks of a mighty battleship, go below in a World War II submarine, and view cockpits of combat aircraft. You’ll also see tanks, a Vietnam River Patrol Boat, and a plane like the one flown by the Tuskegee Airmen. It’s all here, all waiting to be discovered by you! This ship was also featured in Under Siege, the cheesy 90s Steven Segal action movie.

Colonial Williamsburg © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

World’s Largest Living History Museum

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation operates the world’s largest living history museum in Williamsburg, Virginia—the restored 18th-century capital of Britain’s largest, wealthiest, and most populous outpost of empire in the New World.

Meet a Nation Builder like George Washington or Edith Cumbo and admire the craftsmanship of some of the best artisans in the world. Connect with your family over a horse-drawn carriage ride, world-class dining, and a Haunted Williamsburg ghost tour. At the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg explore everything from colorful and whimsical folk art made by amateur artisans to decorative art objects that are useful as well as beautiful.

New River Gorge Bridge © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

A Work of Structural Art

When the New River Gorge Bridge was completed on October 22, 1977, a travel challenge was solved. The bridge reduced a 40-minute drive down narrow mountain roads and across one of North America’s oldest rivers to less than a minute. When it comes to road construction, mountains do pose a challenge. In the case of the New River Gorge Bridge challenge was transformed into a work of structural art—the longest steel span in the western hemisphere and the third highest in the United States.

New River Gorge Bridge © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The New River Gorge Bridge is one of the most photographed places in West Virginia. The bridge was chosen to represent the state on the commemorative quarter released by the U.S. Mint in 2006. In 2013, the National Park Service listed the New River Gorge Bridge in the National Register of Historic Places as a significant historic resource.

New River Gorge Bridge © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Home to the New River which drops 750 feet over 66 miles, adventuresome rafters and kayakers have long been drawn to this whitewater area for its class five rapids. The New River which flows northward through low-cut canyons in the Appalachian Mountains is one of the oldest rivers on the planet. New River Gorge National Park encompasses more than 70,000 acres of land along the New River. Mark America’s newest national park on your map, pack up the RV, and hit the road for Almost Heaven awaits you.

Worth Pondering…

When the Frost is on the Punkin

When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock,

And you hear the kyouck and gobble of the struttin’ turkey-cock,

And the clackin’ of the guineys, and the cluckin’ of the hens,

And the rooster’s hallylooyer as he tiptoes on the fence;

O, it’s then’s the times a feller is a-feelin’ at his best,

With the risin’ sun to greet him from a night of peaceful rest,

As he leaves the house, bareheaded, and goes out to feed the stock,

When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock.

—James Whitcomb Riley

Lucky A: USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park

Dive into history as you explore the “Mighty A”: 79 years strong and open to the public for tours

Visitors walk the decks and cabins in respectful silence. They read the historic papers and scan the old photographs and try to imagine what it was like. But it’s impossible to envision the roaring thunder and smoke, the ear-shattering shouting and scrambling, the unspeakable horror and death that happened on the USS Alabama, not once but through 37 months of active duty. She earned not only nine battle stars but also the nickname “Lucky A” from her crew of 2,500 because she emerged unscathed from the heat of each battle. The Alabama saw action in the Atlantic for a year before joining the Pacific Fleet in mid-1943.

USS Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

There she fought at such key locations as Leyte, the Gilbert Islands, and Okinawa. The Alabama served in every major engagement in the Pacific during World War II. After the signing of the war-ending surrender documents in September 1945, the Alabama led the American fleet into Tokyo Bay. The sixth vessel to bear the name, Alabama, the battleship was launched February 16, 1942.

USS Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The first Alabama, a 56-ton Revenue Cutter built at New York and acquired in 1819 at a cost of $4,500, was active in the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico in the 1820s. The second and third Alabama (1849 and 1861), both U.S. Steamers, also pre-dated the American Civil War. The Legendary Confederate Commerce Raider, CSS Alabama, captured or sank 69 Union ships during the War Between the States. The fifth Alabama, BB-8, was a battleship commissioned in 1900, and was a member of the Great White Fleet. She was the flagship for Division 1, Battleship Force, Atlantic Fleet, during World War I.

USS Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Displacing more than 44,500 tons, the USS Alabama Battleship measures 680 feet from stem to stern, half as long as the Empire State Building is tall. Armed with nine, 16-inch guns in three turrets and 20, 5-inch, .38-caliber guns in 10 twin mounts, her main batteries could fire shells, as heavy as a small car, accurately for a distance of more than 20 miles.

USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Her steel side armor was a foot thick above the waterline, tapering to one half inch at the bottom. Her four propellers, each weighing more than 18 tons, could drive her through the seas up to 28 knots (32 mph). Loaded with 7,000 tons of fuel oil, her range was about 15,000 nautical miles. The USS Alabama was built to fight.

USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

In 1964, a campaign was launched to bring the “Mighty A” home to Alabama, as a memorial to the state’s sons and daughters who had served in the armed forces. Alabama school children raised almost $100,000 in mostly nickels, dimes, and quarters to help bring her home to her final resting place.

On January 9, 1965, the “Mighty A” was opened to the public as an independent agency of the state of Alabama. Since then, more than 14 million visitors have walked her decks and stood in awe of her majestic presence.

USS Drum © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

While onboard, see the museum displays and hear first-hand the remembrances of crew members who served aboard the Alabama. A continuous-running film showcases the recollections—some humorous, many poignant and painful—of the crew. The interviews are interspersed with startling footage of aircraft attacks.

USS Drum © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The submarine USS Drum (SS-228), a World War II veteran with 12 Battle Stars, joined the USS Alabama on July 4, 1969. The USS Drum is credited with sinking 15 ships, a total of 80,580 tons of enemy shipping, the eighth highest of all U.S. submarines in total Japanese tonnage sunk.

USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

In 2001, Drum was moved onto land for permanent display, the project winning several engineering awards. USS Drum is the oldest American submarine on display in the world.

At the USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park, the World War II battleship and submarine are the highlights of the bayside park. Many historic warplanes are also on display. A Vietnam Memorial and a Korean War Memorial honor veterans of those wars on the park grounds.

USS Drum © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

On self-guided tours of the 175-acre military attraction you can view the cockpits of some two dozen aircraft, check out tanks from years gone by, inspect a Vietnam patrol boat, and take the controls of a lifelike flight simulator.

Worth Pondering…

You can talk about teamwork on a baseball team, but I’ll tell you, it takes teamwork when you have 2,900 men stationed on the USS Alabama in the South Pacific.

—Bob Feller (1918-2010), all-star pitcher, Cleveland Indians